Version classiqueVersion mobile
OpenEdition Books

Language Testing Reconsidered

 | 
Janna Fox
, 
Mari Wesche
, 
Doreen Bayliss
, 
et al.

Notes on Contributors

Texte intégral

1J. Charles Alderson is Professor of Linguistics and English Language Education at the University of Lancaster. He was Scientific Coordinator of DIALANG 1999–2002 (www.dialang.org). He is internationally well known for his research and publications in language testing, including 17 books, 79 articles in refereed journals and chapters in books, 19 other publications, including research reports, 165 papers presented at professional conferences and seminars, and 197 seminars, workshops, and consultancies.

2Lyle F. Bachman is Professor and Chair, Department of Applied Linguistics and TESL, University of California, Los Angeles. His current research interests include validation theory, assessing the academic achievement and English proficiency of English language learners in schools, assessing foreign language proficiency, interfaces between second language acquisition and language testing research, and epistemological issues in applied linguistics research. His most recent publication is Statistical Analyses for Language Assessment (Cambridge, 2004).

3Andrew D. Cohen is Professor of Applied Linguistics, MA in ESL Program, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. His research interests are in language learner strategies, pragmatics, language assessment, and research methods. Recent scholarly efforts include an ELT Advantage online course on assessing language ability in adults (Thomson Heinle) and Language Learner Strategies: 30 Years of Research and Practice (co-edited with Ernesto Macaro, OUP, September 2007).

4Alan Davies is Emeritus Professor of Applied Linguistics in the University of Edinburgh. One-time editor of the journals Applied Linguistics and Language Testing, he was founding Director of the Language Testing Research Centre in the University of Melbourne. His research interests are in language assessment in relation to World Englishes and in the concept of the native speaker. Recent publications include The Native Speaker: Myth and Reality (Multilingual Matters, 2003) and A Glossary of Applied Linguistics (Lawrence Erlbaum, 2005).

5Anne Lazaraton is an Associate Professor of English as a Second Language at the University of Minnesota where she teaches courses in ESL methodology, language analysis, practicum, discourse analysis, and language assessment. Her book, A Qualitative Approach to the Validation of Oral Language Tests, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2002. Her current research interests include teacher talk and presidential bullying of the press.

6Tim McNamara is Professor of Applied Linguistics at The University of Melbourne in Australia. His research interests include language testing and language and identity. He is the author of Language Testing (OUP, 2000) and (with Carsten Roever) Language Testing: The Social Dimension (Blackwell, 2006).

7Elana Shohamy is Professor of Language Education, School of Education, Tel-Aviv University. Her research focus on political and educational dimensions of language tests and topics related to language policy in multilingual societies. Her recent books are: The Power of Tests: Critical Perspective of the Use of Language Tests (Longman, 2001), and Language Policy: Hidden Agendas and New Approaches (Taylor & Francis Group, 2006). She is the current editor of the journal Language Policy.

8Bernard Spolsky was born in New Zealand. He studied there and in Canada, and has taught in New Zealand, Australia, England, the United States and Israel. He retired as professor emeritus in 2000, and since then has continued writing and lecturing, mainly on language policy. His book Language Policy was published in 2004, and he is currently writing a book on language management and editing the Blackwell Handbook of Educational Linguistics. He received the ILTA-UCLES Award for Lifetime Achievement in Language Testing and has been elected an honorary member of the Japan Language Testing Association.

9Lynda Taylor is Assistant Director of the Research and Validation Group within Cambridge ESOL, where she assists in coordinating the ESOL research program and disseminating research outcomes. She has extensive experience of theoretical and practical issues in language assessment. Current interests include the testing of speaking/writing, as well as the impact of linguistic variety on language assessment. Recent publications include an article in ELT Journal and a co-edited volume, IELTS Collected Papers.

© Les Presses de l’Université d’Ottawa | University of Ottawa Press, 2007

Conditions d’utilisation : http://www.openedition.org/6540

Acheter

Volume papier

amazon.fr