Version classiqueVersion mobile
OpenEdition Books

Proceedings of the fourth Resilience Engineering Symposium

 | 
Erik Hollnagel
, 
Éric Rigaud
, 
Denis Besnard

Exploring Safe Work Method Statements In The Australian Construction Industry: A Prospective Study In Resilience Engineering

Manikam Pillay, David Borys et Dennis Else

Note de l’auteur

Note portant sur l’auteur1

Note portant sur l’auteur2

Note portant sur l’auteur3

Texte intégral

1Construction worksites are not only one of the most hazardous for workers but are also complex, posing significant challenges for safety managers intending to achieve higher levels of safety in the industry. In Australia legislation requires that health and safety risks associated with high risk construction activities be controlled through safe work method statements. These are essentially safety rules, and one of the commonly held beliefs surrounding their use as a risk control strategy is that workers would be safe if they followed rules as prescribed by their managers and/or supervisors. However, this may not necessarily be true; and it is more likely that workers will adapt the rules to the context in which they need to be applied. Because this adaptation involves interpreting rules prescribed by management and translating it into work practices, there are expected to be gaps between the two. This gap, which can represents the gap between work as imagined and work as performed, is an important indicator of an organisation’s resilience. As a set of rules, safe work method statements provide an ideal opportunity to explore resilience engineering in construction organisations.

Notes

1 Victorian Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, School of Science and Engineering, University of Ballarat, Mount Helen Campus, Ballarat, Australia manikampillay@students.ballarat.edu.au

2 Victorian Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, School of Science and Engineering, University of Ballarat, Mount Helen Campus, Ballarat, Australia d.borys@ballarat.edu.au

3 Victorian Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, School of Science and Engineering, University of Ballarat, Mount Helen Campus, Ballarat, Australia d.else@ballarat.edu.au

© Presses des Mines, 2011

Conditions d’utilisation : http://www.openedition.org/6540