Version classiqueVersion mobile
OpenEdition Books

Proceedings of the fourth Resilience Engineering Symposium

 | 
Erik Hollnagel
, 
Éric Rigaud
, 
Denis Besnard

Engineering Naval Resilience: Expeditionary Command and Control

Christopher Nemeth, Sterling Wiggins, Robert Strouse, Beth Crandall et C. Matthew O’Connor

Résumé

Command and control (C2) systems are essential to US Navy expeditionary forces’ ability to adapt to uncertain, complex, and rapidly evolving missions and work settings. Various portions of the expeditionary command structure include circumstances that a common operating picture can benefit. A C2 system can serve as a source of resilience for these forces by providing a common operating picture that is available to each level in the command hierarchy. Such a display makes it possible for each level in the command hierarchy to perform needed cognitive work from planning and replanning to problem detection, sensemaking, situation assessment, naturalistic decision making, and coordination. Our project for the U.S. Navy used cognitive systems engineering to develop requirements, a C2 display prototype, and a guide to integrate human-centered design into the small scale systems acquisition process. We describe our research and its implications for contributing to the resilience of expeditionary forces and Navy systems acquisition.

Les formats HTML, PDF et ePub de cet ouvrage sont accessibles aux usagers des bibliothèques et institutions qui l'ont acquis dans le cadre de l'offre OpenEdition Freemium for Books. L'ouvrage pourra également être acheté sur les sites de nos libraires partenaires, aux formats PDF et ePub. Si l’édition papier est disponible, des liens vers les librairies sont également proposés sur cette page.

Extrait du texte

1 Introduction

A command and control (C2) system is an essential cognitive aid that military operating forces can use to manage their resources. U.S. Navy expeditionary forces are the smaller operational units that are deployed in combination with ships, aircraft and submarines and must be highly adaptive to meet mission requirements that vary widely in type, scale, and location. C2 systems are essential to expeditionary forces’ ability to adapt to uncertain, complex, and rapidly evolving missions and work settings. A C2 system can serve as a source of resilience (Hollnagel, Woods and Leveson, 2006) for these forces by providing a common operating picture that is available to each level in the command hierarchy.

Our project is the first to use cognitive systems engineering (CSE) (Woods and Roth, 1988) to develop a human-centered C2 information system for the Navy. We have done this by developing system requirements and the C2 information display based on data collected in observations...

Auteurs

Cognitive Solutions Division, Applied Research Associates, Fairborn, OH, USA
cnemeth@ara.com

Cognitive Solutions Division, Applied Research Associates, Fairborn, OH, USA
cnemeth@ara.com

Cognitive Solutions Division, Applied Research Associates, Fairborn, OH, USA
cnemeth@ara.com

Cognitive Solutions Division, Applied Research Associates, Fairborn, OH, USA
cnemeth@ara.com

OPNAV N857/NECC C2 Capability Area Manager Naval Surface Warfare Center Dam Neck, VA, USA
matthew.oconnor@navy.mil

© Presses des Mines, 2011

Conditions d’utilisation : http://www.openedition.org/6540