Version classiqueVersion mobile

Women and Migration

 | 
Deborah Willis
, 
Ellyn Toscano
, 
Kalia Brooks Nelson

Part six. Transit, transiting, and transition

26. Urban Candy: Screens, Selfies and Imaginings

Roshini Kempadoo

Texte intégral

As I stepped off the 436 bus that was heading to New Cross, a young Black man was being refused entry.

Even though it was stationary and at the bus stop.

Very few of us knew why.
In protest, he stood in front of the bus, challenging the bus driver to pull out and drive. The bus driver revved the engine and inched forward. The man, the driver, bus passengers and I were watching the impasse wondering what would happen next.

Smartphones were out videoing the scene, recording the shouts, arms outstretched across the bus windscreen, recording the engine revs — ready to post and share with others elsewhere what was to happen next.

Author’s note, 24 November 2011, Lewisham, London

  • 1 Michel Foucault, ‘Des Espaces Autres’ [Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias], Jay Miskowiec (t (...)
  • 2 Nicholas Mirzoeff, How to See the World (London: Pelican Books, 2015).

1I have a keen sense of being, listening and observing, watching out for other folk, and generally ‘minding myself’, and this tunes me — or should I say fine-tunes me — into the city as I journey through it in a state of transit, transiting, transition. A heightened sense of being in the physical space, whilst on my smartphone networked to others and with a screen sense of elsewhere, feeds the soul and the imagination, which is readily alert, mindful, enriched. Two conditions of the self co-exist and contest each other — being on the phone and being on the move. As I travel in the urban space, smartphone ready, mobile-screen-obsessed, I physically move through a network of urban sites from one place to another and back again — coffee bar, train, bus, work, pub, home — within temporal, perpetual, transitory and relational spaces of the ‘now.’ Meanwhile the attraction and use of the smartphone proposes a utopic mirror-like site deemed to be a ‘placeless place’1 that is virtual, connected and extended. Our bodies, Nicholas Mirzoeff notes, ‘[…] are now in the network and in the world at the same time.’2

  • 3 I commissioned writer Erica Masserano for the fictional texts for Face Up.
  • 4 Uri McMillan, Embodied Avatars: Genealogies of Black Feminist Art and Performance (New York: New Yo (...)
  • 5 Stuart Hall, ‘What Is This “Black” in Black Popular Culture?’, in Gina Dent and Michelle Wallace (e (...)

2This is to introduce the idea of Urban Candy, as given in the title, as a state of becoming: identities are in formation and in motion, in an ongoing relationship to the smartphone screen. As a cornucopia for the eyes, Urban Candy is considered a seductive, hypervisualised space of self and screen associated with the city, a perpetual line of sight, an excessive physical and virtual urban experience and environment. This became my impetus for creating the screen-based artwork Face Up in 2015. Central to this is the racialised and diasporised networked body on the move, precarious in her condition and affective in the performative encounter with herself and others. The artwork is constituted as six silent stop-animations that combine still images, graphics and fictional texts as vertical-format screen projections in the gallery space.3 They are conceived as alternative idents, a term originally (and ironically) associated with the promotional video sequences created by television companies as identification videos. These short animations of no more than two minutes each are created as a shared self-branding exercise, popular practice that deploys the look and feel of the smartphone interface. They are all fictional repertoires. The mobile screen, the smartphone reimagined in Face Up corresponds to the popular space of Black feminist art and performance that Uri McMillan sees as being ‘highly charged, mixed, and clashing spaces where cultural identities are imagined, stylized, theatricalized, and rendered “mythic.”’4 McMillan’s allusion to the ‘mythic’ qualities of Black feminist art is in reference to the late Stuart Hall’s use of the term. Hall perceives mythic as being a hybridized space of being and ‘a theatre of popular desires, a theatre of popular fantasies. It is where we discover and play with the identifications of ourselves, where we are imagined, where we are represented…’5

3Face Up was first shown in the Lethaby Gallery, London in 2015, curated by Paul Goodwin. The artwork was subsequently included in the exhibition ‘Unfixed Homeland’ at the Aljira Gallery, New Jersey in 2016, curated by Grace Ali. In the following sections of this visual essay, I explore two of the animations from Face Up entitled Nana and Deirdre. I offer three provocations as commentaries to the itinerant imagery and visual experience of the artwork. I consider Face Up to be a critical artwork created in response to current extreme rightwing tendencies apparent in popular media. It is a contribution to feminist practices, questioning difference and exposing racism that is currently being directed at the physical and symbolic Black woman’s body.

First Provocation. Her Body is Political: The Smartphone as a Creative Knowledge-Making Device

4The artwork considers the smartphone as a visualizing object and extension to her being. It is a technological prosthetic with the ability to transform, amongst other things, our contact with each other, as a socializing device. Equally, the phone’s expanded functionality allows for extending an intimate knowledge about each other and ourselves, our sexual relationships, about our bodies, or our emotional state of being. As a haptic sensory device it allows us to share and develop and reconfigure knowledge about ourselves and our behavior, it becomes hyper-familiar with gestures, desires, appearances and countenance.

5Each ident in Face Up is associated with imagined characters who are occasionally visualized on the screen using stop-frame animation of persons in performance. The action sequences were staged by actors for the camera and taken in continuous shooting mode. They were shot in the green screen studio to edit with different backgrounds, making use of post-production software to edit the footage sequence. Each ident reflects both the immediacy of the person’s smartphone screen, providing a glimpse of the imagined conversations via instant messaging or the visual content of what she might be viewing, whilst evoking a sense of the character as she navigates the city. In other words, the ident at times reflects her screen content and at other times provides distance through the visualized sense of the character herself. The creation of a mise-en-scène for each character is established. Photographs of her possible urban surroundings are construed in order to imagine the character on the bus, on a pavement, on a train platform, in a coffee bar or pub/bar as Fig. 26.1 illustrates.

  • 6 Deborah Willis, ‘The Sociologist’s Eye: W.E.B. Du Bois and the Paris Exposition’, in David Levering (...)
  • 7 Tina M. Campt, Image Matters: Archive, Photography and the African Diaspora in Europe (Durham and L (...)

6The ident entitled Nana (see Figs. 26.1–6) is written as an internal monologue of personal reflection. Nana is evoked as someone in reflexive refashioning mode, in a persistent performance of self-affirmation, or what Deborah Willis describes as a process of continuously creating a ‘revised self-image.’6 A visual rendering of Nana in an animated sequence gives a sense of her, as well as instant text messaging to friends, glimpses of her viewing preferences for shopping, beauty tips, and online dating interests. The narrative appears on the screen as if the screen itself is an active smartphone in which material is being continuously shot, shared, posted and reflected upon. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the visual content of interest to her, and herself imagined. In other words, Nana’s ident actively reflects, as Tina Campt suggests, ‘how black people image and how they imagine themselves.’7

Fig. 26.1 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana. © Roshini Kempadoo.

  • 8 Alisa Lebow (ed.), The Cinema of Me: The Self and Subjectivity in First Person Documentary (London (...)

7The ident is concerned with the visual/textual language of the first person that allows the ‘resonances to reverberate between the I and the we’ as Alisa Lebow notes.8 A more complex subject position and perspective is construed in order to create and be:

  • 9 Trinh T. Minh-ha, Women, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism (Bloomington and India (...)

‘I see myself seeing myself,’ I/i am […] alluding to […] the play of mirrors that defers to infinity the real subject and subverts the notion of an original ‘I.’ A writing for the people, by the people, and from the people is, literally, a multipolar reflecting reflection that remains free from the conditions of subjectivity and objectivity and yet reveals them both.9

Fig. 26.2 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana 01. © Roshini Kempadoo.

Fig. 26.3 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana 05. © Roshini Kempadoo.

Fig. 26.4 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana 11. © Roshini Kempadoo.

Fig. 26.5 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana 09. © Roshini Kempadoo.

Fig. 26.6 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana 07. © Roshini Kempadoo.

Second Provocation. Her State of Emergency: Visual Registers of Violence

  • 10 Awam Amkpa, ‘Introductions: Welcome — Black Portraiture{s}II’, unpublished paper delivered at the c (...)
  • 11 The UN Migration Agency: International Organisation for Migration, ‘Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals (...)

8The ident projections created as Face Up are imagined senses of everyday urban spaces as networked and complex evocations of both embodied and symbolic identities. Set within the present, they register the scenescapes of London, the US and elsewhere, to engage with ways in which people of color make sense of, and are subjected to, the extreme and tragic narratives of violence, war, and the effects of migration. Necessarily then, the work is concerned with the state of emergency,10 that is, ways in which state and individual violence and racism are enacted on Black bodies as militarization, national counter-terrorist conditions and war-technology capabilities shape our daily lived experiences. Events and circumstances such as: the Grenfell Tower fire in London, June 2017 with an estimated 80 deaths and over 70 persons injured, with a total of 151 homes destroyed; the 22 refugee camps in Turkey, home to at least 217,000 displaced persons in 2014 (UNHCR); or the crossing by boat of trafficked persons (mostly travelling from North Africa and the Middle East) across the Mediterranean to Europe, having reached unprecedented levels (112,018 persons between 1 January to the end of July 2017) are examples of the violent conditions forced on Black folk.11

  • 12 See Hito Steyerl, ‘In Defense of the Poor Image,’ e-flux, 10 (November 2009), [n.p.]; Sean Cubitt, (...)
  • 13 Video detail: October 2015. There was an altercation at Spring Valley High School, South Carolina, (...)

9Smartphone editing techniques are adopted and developed in the artwork Face Up to create the idents, transitioning from one photograph to another, one narration to another or a video to another. These are techniques we are very familiar with and they have been normalized as we engage with media and communicate using smartphones; they include swiping in order to view the next piece of media, sharing emoticons, expanding images, contracting and closing webpages, and seeing other functions and media on the screen, whether pulling up from the bottom or pulling down from the top. The active practice of viewing and engaging with material constitutes the artwork’s aesthetic, format and movement. Smartphone technologies and social media are inextricably linked to the way in which newsworthy events — whether created as authenticated news items, half-truths on personal blogs, or evidence collected as personal data — are circulated and go viral immediately. Viral video footage already published and in circulation that has been posted and shared is also used to create the artwork. Central to this project, then, is the reappropriation and reuse of found and published imagery. Material that is already sourced, already in circulation, things that go viral are all at work here. I am reminded of Hito Steyerl’s commentary about the ideological value of the ‘poor image,’ or Sean Cubitt noting the fascination with the spectacular, the bejewelled, finished, seamless post-produced high quality image.12 In Face Up, I was drawn to create what I describe as unreconstructed imagery, appropriated from the familiar, the badly edited, the over-compressed, the poor quality. Fig. 26.3 for example, is a screenshot taken from the ident Nana as familiar found video footage, reappropriated and reused, of the brutal violence towards Shakara Murphy in 2015, the teenage student at Spring Valley High School, South Carolina, USA who was body-slammed by Ben Fields, the schools resource officer.13

Third Provocation. Her Narratives: Migration, Memory, and History

  • 14 Gillian Rose, Doing Family Photography: The Domestic, the Public and the Politics of Sentiment (Far (...)
  • 15 Donna Haraway, ‘The Persistence of Vision’, in Nicholas Mirzoeff (ed.), The Visual Culture Reader: (...)

10Making use of domestic photography including portraiture, self-portraits and family snapshots allows a focus on the photographic representation of women, which, as Gillian Rose and Campt point out, contain representations of gendered postures, visual displays of intimacy and power and an acknowledgement of the mobility of photographs.14 The smartphone then becomes a way of envisioning knowledge and a kind of sensory apparatus in which, as Donna Haraway proposes, the ‘topography of subjectivities is assumed to be “multidimensional.”’15 The starting point for the artworks is rooted in the city, reflecting my own experience as I travel across London, or else influenced by eavesdropping on other peoples’ partial conversations. Ear-wigging, overhearing other peoples partial conversations, is the urban norm; so too is the daily routine of peering at your screen and that of others whilst moving through the city. These imagined narratives are based on overhearing, participating and overseeing on the move. This is a partial, situated, envisioned point of view of the lived experience of hearing and viewing the lives of others occurs through extended networked technology. I view and read between the lines, gleaning a minimal understanding of what has happened in a distant situation, or what the circumstances might be. The stories are based on a whim or hunch, imagining fictitious endings to narratives that continue without your presence and knowledge. Stories are started and in a sense neverending; they are fluid and nearly always contain what-if scenarios or what-happens-next potential endings.

11Particularly pertinent to the ident video entitled Deirdre (Figs. 26.7–26.9) is the way in which the narrative is conceived as if we may be overhearing part of a conversation between London and elsewhere — Guyana, as it turns out.

  • 16 Author extract from the character description for Face Up.

Deirdre checks her hair using the laptop screen and switches her earplugs from the phone to the laptop. She is in her regular coffee bar near Regent Street around the corner from work, waiting for a Skype call. It is what she suspected […] her cousin in Georgetown has got worse and needs medical treatment. Ordering another flat white, she downloads and forwards the visa forms, looks up airline tickets and checks her bank balance. Her credit card balance has maxed, but she has managed to reserve flights for her Aunt and cousin from Cheddi Jagan International to Gatwick on the new one.16

12The internal monologue appearing on the screen in quick succession is soon replaced by a half-conversation, that is, hearing or rather reading on the screen Deirdre’s part of the conversation she is having with her cousin in Georgetown, Guyana on skype. The silent, visual, written narrative unfolds in the form of a conversation to reveal a deep familiarity with, and the commonality of, the diasporic experience, familial economics and the historical trajectory of Black labouring women’s bodies as integral to sustaining the public health service in the UK.

Fig. 26.7. Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Deirdre 04. © Roshini Kempadoo.

Fig. 26.8. Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork ‘Face Up’, 2015. Deirdre 05 © Roshini Kempadoo.

Fig. 26.9. Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork ‘Face Up’, 2015. Deirdre 06 © Roshini Kempadoo.

  • 17 Stuart Hall, Doreen Massey and Michael Rustin, ‘Framing Statement — after Neoliberalism: Analysing (...)

13As we experience the swipe, cascade and enlargement of published photographs and news items across the screen, Deirdre’s ident video references the contemporary politics of the current UK government as it sets about privatizing the health care system, subjecting it to corporate law and financial markets conceived as ‘[…] being merely descriptive of an ideal state of nature.’17 The state-funded National Health Service (NHS) Stuart Hall, Doreen Massey and Mike Rustin note, was the biggest civil and social project associated with the postwar years, with migration at the heart of its success. Referenced too is the Windrush generation of the late 1940s and 1950s, my parents’ generation (see Fig. 26.4), who formed the first significant mass-migration of Caribbean persons to Europe, encouraged and recruited to migrate to the UK to become NHS health workers and settle as British citizens.

  • 18 T. J. Demos, ‘Being Political/2010 (First Published in Deutsche Guggenheim Magazine, No. 12 (Summer (...)

14Deirdre’s narrative indicates the near and far through in-text references and photographs. These include references to time difference, UK visa restrictions (particularly onerous for persons travelling to the UK with less money and living in a British ex-colony), images of Caribbean landscapes and architecture juxtaposed with London street scenes, hospital architecture and ambulances. The ident video focuses on the contested scenario that is so central to our precarious existence in relation to health, and the welfare and safety of our families, extended friendships, or other persons we would feel compelled (and want) to help. My imperative to create Face Up is a ‘[…] reorganizing aesthetic experience, [in which] […] artworks compel us to transition from recognizing the self’s fundamental social being to considering its ethico-political imperatives,’as T. J. Demos notes.18

Conclusion

  • 19 Cherríe Moraga and Gloria Anzaldúa (eds.), This Bridge Called My Back, Fourth Edition: Writings by (...)

15Face Up is concerned with engendering perspectives in which the self is conceived as social. Its reorganizing visual strategy is to appropriate and extend smartphone aesthetics, with their highly active and sensory networked environment, interface and normalized tendencies to encourage movement, transition and change. My idea has been to develop an aesthetic of intimacy about families and our everyday lived experience, which is concerned with pressing political perspectives. The idents are of imagined narratives and appear as glimpses of possible personal experiences as each imagined woman shares, likes, comments on, and gains knowledge about herself and others through a mediated space. They are created to develop different aesthetics and concepts that may presumed to be theories in the flesh as proposed by Cherríe Moraga.19 That is a feminist view of the world that does not advocate turning away from, but toward, the bodies of women of colour as a project of emotional investment and support.

Bibliographie

Bibliography

Amkpa, Awam, ‘Introductions: Welcome — Black Portraiture{s}II’, unpublished paper delivered at the conference ‘Black Portraiture{s}II: Imaging the Black Body and Re-Staging Histories’, Florence, 28–31 May 2015.

Atkin, Charlie ‘Spring Valley High Assault: Sheriff Claims Video Shows Student “Punched’ Officer”, Independent, 28 October 2015, https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/spring-valley-high-assault-sheriff-claimsvideo-shows-student-punched-officer-a6711676.html

Campt, Tina M., Image Matters: Archive, Photography and the African Diaspora in Europe (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2012).

Cubitt, Sean, The Cinema Effect (Boston: The MIT Press, 2004).

Demos, T. J., ‘Being Political/2010 (First Published in Deutsche Guggenheim Magazine, No. 12 (Summer 2010) 8–13’, in Ian Farr (ed.), Memory: Documents of Contemporary Art (London and Cambridge, MA: Whitechapel Gallery and MIT Press, 2012), pp. 216–19.

Foucault, Michel, ‘Des Espaces Autres’ [Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias], Jay Miskowiec (trans.) in Architecture, Mouvement, Continuité, 5 (1984), 46–49.

Hall, Stuart, ‘What Is this “Black” in Black Popular Culture?’, in Gina Dent and Michelle Wallace (eds.), Black Popular Culture: Discussions in Contemporary Culture #8 (Seattle: The New Press and the Dia Center for the Arts, 1992), pp. 21–33.

Hall, Stuart, Doreen Massey and Michael Rustin, ‘Framing Statement — after Neoliberalism: Analysing the Present’, in After Neoliberalism? The Kilburn Manifesto, ed. by Stuart Hall and Michael Rustin Doreen Massey (London: Lawrence & Wishart: Soundings Collections, 2013), pp. 9–23, https://doi.org/10.3898/136266213806045656

Haraway, Donna, ‘The Persistence of Vision’, in Nicholas Mirzoeff (ed.), The Visual Culture Reader: Second Edition (London: Routledge, 2002), pp. 678–84.

Lebow, Alisa (ed.), The Cinema of Me: The Self and Subjectivity in First Person Documentary (London and New York: WallFlower Press and Columbia University Press, 2012).

McMillan, Uri, Embodied Avatars: Genealogies of Black Feminist Art and Performance (New York: New York University Press, 2015).

The UN Migration Agency: International Organisation for Migration, ‘Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 112,018 in 2017; 2,361 Deaths’, International Organisation for Migration, 2017, https://www.iom.int/news/mediterranean-migrant-arrivals-reach-112018-2017-2361-deaths

Minh-ha, Trinh T., Women, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1989).

Mirzoeff, Nicholas, How to See the World (London: Pelican Books, 2015).

Moraga, Cherríe and Gloria Anzaldúa (eds.), This Bridge Called My Back, Fourth Edition: Writings by Radical Women of Color (Original Publication, 1981), 4th edition (New York: Suny Press, 2015).

Rose, Gillian, Doing Family Photography: The Domestic, the Public and the Politics of Sentiment (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010).

Steyerl, Hito, ‘In Defense of the Poor Image’, e-flux, 10 (November 2009), [n.p.].

Willis, Deborah, ‘The Sociologist’s Eye: W.E.B. Du Bois and the Paris Exposition’, in David Levering Lewis and Deborah Lewis (eds.), A Small Nation of People: W.E.B. Du Bois & African American Portraits of Progress (New York: The Library of Congress, Amistad, and HarperCollins Publishers, 2003), pp. 51–78.

Notes

1 Michel Foucault, ‘Des Espaces Autres’ [Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias], Jay Miskowiec (trans.) in Architecture, Mouvement, Continuité, 5 (1984), 46–49.

2 Nicholas Mirzoeff, How to See the World (London: Pelican Books, 2015).

3 I commissioned writer Erica Masserano for the fictional texts for Face Up.

4 Uri McMillan, Embodied Avatars: Genealogies of Black Feminist Art and Performance (New York: New York University Press, 2015), p. 207.

5 Stuart Hall, ‘What Is This “Black” in Black Popular Culture?’, in Gina Dent and Michelle Wallace (eds.), Black Popular Culture: Discussions in Contemporary Culture #8 (Seattle: The New Press and the Dia Center for the Arts, 1992), pp. 21–33 (p. 32).

6 Deborah Willis, ‘The Sociologist’s Eye: W.E.B. Du Bois and the Paris Exposition’, in David Levering Lewis and Deborah Lewis (eds.), A Small Nation of People: W.E.B. Du Bois & African American Portraits of Progress (New York: The Library of Congress, Amistad, HarperCollins Publishers, 2003), pp. 51–78.

7 Tina M. Campt, Image Matters: Archive, Photography and the African Diaspora in Europe (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2012), p. 5.

8 Alisa Lebow (ed.), The Cinema of Me: The Self and Subjectivity in First Person Documentary (London and New York: Wall Flower Press and Columbia University Press, 2012), p. 2.

9 Trinh T. Minh-ha, Women, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1989), p. 22.

10 Awam Amkpa, ‘Introductions: Welcome — Black Portraiture{s}II’, unpublished paper delivered at the conference ‘Black Portraiture{s}II: Imaging the Black Body and Re-Staging Histories’, Florence, 28–31 May 2015.

11 The UN Migration Agency: International Organisation for Migration, ‘Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 112,018 in 2017; 2,361 Deaths’, International Organisation for Migration, 2017, https://www.iom.int/news/mediterranean-migrant-arrivals-reach-112018-2017-2361-deaths

12 See Hito Steyerl, ‘In Defense of the Poor Image,’ e-flux, 10 (November 2009), [n.p.]; Sean Cubitt, The Cinema Effect (Boston: The MIT Press, 2004).

13 Video detail: October 2015. There was an altercation at Spring Valley High School, South Carolina, in which Richland County Sheriff’s Deputy Ben Fields was caught on camera body-slamming a young female student. Shakara Murphy was placed in a chokehold, flipped over in her seat, then dragged and thrown across her classroom before being handcuffed by a South Carolina school officer. Niya Kenny and Shakara both faced misdemeanour charges at the time, which were later dropped. See newspaper article: Charlie Atkin, ‘Spring Valley High Assault: Sheriff Claims Video Shows Student “Punched” Officer’, Independent, 28 October 2015, https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/spring-valley-high-assaultsheriff-claims-video-shows-student-punched-officer-a6711676.html

14 Gillian Rose, Doing Family Photography: The Domestic, the Public and the Politics of Sentiment (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010).

15 Donna Haraway, ‘The Persistence of Vision’, in Nicholas Mirzoeff (ed.), The Visual Culture Reader: Second Edition (London: Routledge, 2002), pp. 678–84 (p. 681).

16 Author extract from the character description for Face Up.

17 Stuart Hall, Doreen Massey and Michael Rustin, ‘Framing Statement — after Neoliberalism: Analysing the Present’, in Stuart Hall and Michael Rustin Doreen Massey (eds.), After Neoliberalism? The Kilburn Manifesto (London: Lawrence & Wishart: Soundings Collections, 2013), pp. 9–23 (p. 10).

18 T. J. Demos, ‘Being Political/2010 (First Published in Deutsche Guggenheim Magazine, No. 12 (Summer 2010) 8–13’, in Ian Farr (ed.), Memory: Documents of Contemporary Art (London and Cambridge, MA: Whitechapel Gallery and MIT Press, 2012), pp. 216–19 (p. 219).

19 Cherríe Moraga and Gloria Anzaldúa (eds.), This Bridge Called My Back, Fourth Edition: Writings by Radical Women of Color (1981; New York: Suny Press, 2015).

Table des illustrations

Légende Fig. 26.1 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana. © Roshini Kempadoo.
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/8089/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 392k
Légende Fig. 26.2 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana 01. © Roshini Kempadoo.
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/8089/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 336k
Légende Fig. 26.3 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana 05. © Roshini Kempadoo.
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/8089/img-3.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 412k
Légende Fig. 26.4 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana 11. © Roshini Kempadoo.
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/8089/img-4.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 292k
Légende Fig. 26.5 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana 09. © Roshini Kempadoo.
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/8089/img-5.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 336k
Légende Fig. 26.6 Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Nana 07. © Roshini Kempadoo.
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/8089/img-6.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 260k
Légende Fig. 26.7. Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork Face Up, 2015. Deirdre 04. © Roshini Kempadoo.
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/8089/img-7.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 500k
Légende Fig. 26.8. Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork ‘Face Up’, 2015. Deirdre 05 © Roshini Kempadoo.
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/8089/img-8.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 296k
Légende Fig. 26.9. Roshini Kempadoo, Screen still from the artwork ‘Face Up’, 2015. Deirdre 06 © Roshini Kempadoo.
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/8089/img-9.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 332k

Auteur

An international photographer, media artist and Reader at the University of Westminster, London, creating photographs, artworks and writings that interpret, analyse and reimagine historical experiences and memories as women’s visual narratives. Central to this is to reconceptualise the visual archive, the subject of her monograph Creole in the Archive: Imagery, Presence and Location of the Caribbean Figure (2016). Roshini is a cultural activist and advocate. She was instrumental in establishing the association of black photographers Autograph ABP, established at Rivington Place, London and contributed to the development of Ten.8 International Photographic Magazine (1986–1990). Roshini studied visual communications and photography, creating photographs for exhibition including the seminal digital montage series ‘ECU: European Currency Unfolds’ (1992), Laing Gallery, Newcastle. She was a member of Format Women’s Picture Agency (1983–2003). Roshini’s artwork FaceUp explores taking selfies, mobile technology and diasporic urban life for the exhibition ‘Ghosts: Keith Piper and Roshini Kempadoo’ (2015), Lethaby Gallery, London. Her project ‘Follow the Money’ revisits the question of economic migration and inequality, women’s bodies and European diaspora narratives. She is an editorial board member of Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism.

Acheter

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search