Version classiqueVersion mobile

The Life and Letters of William Sharp and “Fiona Macleod”. Volume 1

 | 
William Sharp
, 
Fiona Macleod

Chapter Eight

Texte intégral

Life: January-June, 1892

1Sharp left for America on January 6 aboard the Teutonic and arrived in New York a week later where he stayed initially with the Stedmans at 173 West 78th Street. Through his friendship with the Stedmans and others who he met during his first visit to New York in 1889, he had immediate access to the literary and publishing elite of the city. Chief among them was Richard Henry Stoddard, a poet and man of letters who with Stedman presided over the literary life of the city. Stedman also arranged for Sharp to meet J. M. Stoddart who edited the prestigious Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine in Philadelphia. When Sharp wondered if it might be possible to meet Walt Whitman, who lived in Camden, New Jersey across the Delaware River from Philadelphia, Stedman’s son Arthur, who knew Whitman, offered to write a letter of introduction. Whitman was a revered figure in the literary circles Sharp frequented in London, and the possibility of actually meeting him was enormously attractive. After arriving on Wednesday, January thirteenth Sharp went by train to Philadelphia on the fifteenth and the next morning he called on Stoddart to discuss possible articles for publication in Lippincott’s. When Sharp said he hoped to meet Whitman, Stoddart immediately contacted Horace Traubel who clerked in a nearby bank.

2A handsome man of thirty-four who was himself a poet, Traubel was Whitman’s principal caretaker and would become his literary executor and biographer. He is best known for transcribing and compiling nine volumes of daily conversations entitled With Walt Whitman in Camden. His main concern in 1892 was keeping Whitman in good health and good spirits. Unable to get his letter of introduction to Sharp before he left New York, Stedman sent it to a Philadelphia bookseller for Sharp to retrieve. Traubel said a letter of introduction was unnecessary and offered to take Sharp to Camden that afternoon to meet Whitman who was bedridden, but able to receive guests. Sharp described the visit in a letter to his wife. Whitman was lying in “his narrow bed, with his white beard, white locks, and ashy-gray face in vague relief, in the afternoon light, against the white pillows and coverlet.” They discussed the London literary scene, and Sharp assured the ailing poet he was revered by many British writers. In his parting words, Whitman gave Sharp a mission::

William Sharp when you go back to England, tell those friends of whom you have been speaking, and all others whom you may know and I do not, that words fail me to express my deep gratitude to them for sympathy and aid truly enough beyond acknowledgment. Good-bye to you and to them – the last greetings of a tired old poet.

3Two months after Sharp’s visit, Whitman died.

4After returning to New York, Sharp continued meeting with publishers and friends. On Friday, he crossed the Hudson River with Henry Mills Alden, editor of Harper’s Magazine, and spent the weekend with his family in Metuchen, New Jersey. On Monday, he returned to the city with Alden and boarded a train to Boston to meet with Horace Scudder, editor of the Atlantic Monthly. On Tuesday or Wednesday in Cambridge, he visited Louise Chandler Moulton who was frequently in London and shared Sharp’s affection for the Marston family, especially Sharp’s friend Philip Marston who died prematurely in 1887. He had considered extending his stay in America to talk with more editors and publishers, but shortly after arriving in Boston he received word of his younger brother Edward’s unexpected death and decided to sail for home as planned the following Wednesday, February 3. He returned to New York on Thursday and spent the night with Arthur Stedman. On Friday he moved to E. C. Stedman’s house, and on Saturday evening had dinner with Mrs. Thomas Harland, the mother of Henry Harland, an American writer and a good friend who was living in London. During the weekend he met again with Henry Alden and, in a letter thanking Scudder for his hospitality, reported Mrs. Alden’s health was deteriorating. Scudder and Alden met as undergraduates at Williams College and remained life-long friends. On Tuesday he moved to a midtown hotel and boarded the Majestic early the next morning.

Fig. 10. Walt Whitman, aged 37, from the frontispiece to Leaves of Grass (Fulton St., Brooklyn, N. Y, 1855). Steel engraving by Samuel Hollyer from a lost daguerreotype by Gabriel Harrison (1854), Wikimedia, https://commons.wikimedia.org/​wiki/​File:Walt_Whitman,_steel_engraving,_July_1854.jpg, Public Domain.

5Despite its sad ending, Sharp’s eighteen-day visit in the United States was both pleasant and productive. He solidified his friendships with the editors of Harper’s Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, and The New York Independent and met the editor of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine. He gained a better idea of the kind of articles and poems they would publish and discussed various writing projects. Like so many British writers Sharp wanted to take advantage of the growing American market, to increase his income. He received an offer from a leading American theatrical manager to buy the rights to the play he was writing based on A Fellowe and His Wife. Through Arthur Stedman, he negotiated successfully with Charles Webster and Company for the American publication of Romantic Ballads and Sospiri di Roma in a single volume that appeared in the latter part of 1892 as Flower o’the Vine. Sharp wanted his friend Bliss Carman, a fellow poet, to write the introduction to the volume, but Stedman preferred another friend of Sharp’s, Thomas Janvier, a short story writer, not a poet, but better known than Carman. Sharp relented and informed Stedman that Janvier would write the introduction if properly compensated. A deal was struck, and Janvier produced a glowing introduction for which Sharp was grateful.

6After a rough mid-winter crossing, Sharp arrived in Liverpool on February 10 and spent a few days recuperating in London before going north on February 14 to comfort his mother. In Edinburgh, he explained in a letter to Arthur Stedman why he was not enthusiastic about giving his next book, which he now called “Dramatic Vistas,” to Charles Webster as a follow-up publication to Flower o’the Vine. Acting as an agent for Webster and Company, Arthur had written to say Sharp’s reluctance in this regard was “shabby.” Sharp said he did not wish to issue these “new things in a new dramatic form” in an ordinary way, but in a small privately printed edition and under a pseudonym. He was convinced the lukewarm reception of his Romantic Ballads and Sospiri di Roma was due, at least in part, to his reputation as an editor and to enemies he made as a reviewer.

I have my own reasons for wishing to issue them in this way in the first instance. They are new in method and manner, and are, I believe, the best work of the kind I can do. Work of this kind is so dear to me that I am relatively indifferent to its financial success: and, in addition, I am particularly curious to see how these “Dramatic Vistas” will be received, without any of the bias for or against involved in the attachment of my name to them.

7He said C. L. Webster could publish a trade edition of the book as by William Sharp, but only after he issued a small private edition for friends and reviewers under the pseudonym H. P. Siwaarmill, an anagram for William Sharp. When he was in Germany working with Blanch Willis Howard on A Fellowe and His Wife in October 1891, he purchased Maurice Maeterlinck’s La Princess Maleine and Les Aveugles, read straight through them, and, in his diary, called their author a “writer of singular genius.” Over the next two days, he produced under the influence of Maeterlinck five “Dramatic Interludes” and decided to publish them under the pseudonym. In February 1892 the five short dramas had grown to eight entitled Dramatic Vistas, and when the book finally appeared in 1894 it became simply Vistas with William Sharp as author.

8Back in London by February 19, Sharp thanked Thomas Janvier for a copy of his recently published The Uncle of an Angel, and Other Stories and said he was planning to settle down in London for a period of intense writing. He had finished his “Dramatic Vistas,” some of which he read to Catherine Janvier in New York. In a letter of February 23, he told Laura Stedman he had rented rooms at 11 Bedford Gardens, near Campden Hill in Kensington which had a studio where Elizabeth, who had many friends in the area, was doing some painting. They took the rooms for only a brief period because they planned to rent “a cottage or small house somewhere in the country – probably at a place a few miles north of Cookham Dene and the Woods of Waldegrave.” They would remove all their books and furniture from storage, and “either live in it for weeks at a time, or for a day or two as the humour takes us, or either of us.” The house would provide a retreat where Sharp could focus on “more serious and lasting work,” but it would have to be near London so both Sharps could continue writing and reviewing for the periodicals and papers.

9In late February or early March Sharp’s Life and Letters of Joseph Severn finally appeared, and in March, A Fellowe and His Wife was published by Osgood, McIlvaine & Company in London and Houghton and Mifflin & Company in Boston. It was issued simultaneously in Germany in the Tauchnitz Collection of British Authors. In March Sharp visited Thomas Hardy in Dorset, a visit that resulted in an article on Hardy in the July Forum. Sharp had also made a new friend, J. Stanley Little, an art critic who lived with his brother George Leon Little, a painter, in Bucks Green, a small village in Sussex. In a letter of March 9, Sharp asked Little if he knew of any cottages or small houses (two sitting rooms, four bedrooms, and near a station) available for a modest rental. He would come down and see anything that might be available.

10By mid-April, the Sharps had given up their rented rooms in Kensington. The return address on his April 13 letter to E. C. Stedman – 16 Winchester Road | Swiss Cottage – was the home of Edith and Frank Rinder. He told Stedman he was about to go to France for some weeks and continued: “The ‘Old Adam’ calls me, and alas I am weak.” Elizabeth, he said, had gone with friends to the Isle of Wight for a week or so and would join him in Paris “three weeks hence.” He added this passage: “My love to Mrs. Stedman – but do not let her know that I am a backslider, as she already has but an indifferent opinion of my much tried virtue. I really am going to reform – but ‘owing to unavoidable circumstances’ must not begin all at once or too hurriedly!” It is hard to read such a passage without speculating that Elizabeth and William, in all their moving about and absences from each other, were attempting to adjust to the presence of Edith Rinder in their lives, trying to make room and find spaces for Edith and William to be together. Some of his letters from France imply Edith was with him for at least part of his first two weeks in France. Sharp’s desire to be alone for periods of time with Edith, which Elizabeth seems to have accepted, must have been a factor in the plans for a house in Sussex.

11Before he left for Paris Sharp returned the proofs of the “Sospiri di Roma” section of Flower o’the Vine to Charles Webster along with the manuscript of a new poem entitled “Epilogue | Il Bosco Sacro | To __________.” In the letter accompanying the proofs, he said he would not “let Sospiri appear again without the ‘Epilogue’ – which, to my mind, is one of the most essential things in the book.” It is a love poem in which Sharp adopted the voice of the feminine Dusk “on the dim Campagna” who is “hushfully seeking | the Night, her lover.” Silence reigns until

Suddenly…… thrilling
Long-drawn vibrations!
Passionate preludes
Of passionate song!
O the wild music
Tost through the silence.

12But the music recedes, and the stillness returns. It was too “wild” and “sweet” to last. Dusk recalls the day when “Together we gather’d | The perfect blooms,” but “Here is one only | Longing forever, | Longing, longing | With passion and pain.” The voice of the Night remains silent until finally it returns in rapture:

Come, O beloved!
O heart be still!

O song of joy!
Glad voice of my passion
Singing there
Out of the heart of
The fragrant darkness!

My soul’s desire!
O never, never
Lost though afar,
My Joy, my Dream!
Too deep the rapture
Of this sweet sorrow,
Of this glad pain:
O heart, still thy beating,
O bird, thy song!

13Her soul’s desire is “afar,” but she hears, or recalls, his “song of joy” emerge from the darkness. The “Joy” and “rapture” was too sweet to disappear despite the distance. The dedicatee following the title was left blank, but surely the poem was intended for Edith Wingate Rinder who, after she returned from Italy to London, was “afar,” but “never lost.”

14Sharp’s insistence on adding the “Epilogue” while omitting the “Preface” to the 1888 Romantic Ballads and Poems of Phantasy is significant. The “Preface” announced the dawn of a new Romanticism in which imagination would take precedence over formal perfection in poetry. The poems in that volume initiated the dawning age, but his next volume would reflect its full glory. “I am tortured by the passionate desire to create beauty, to sing something of the ‘impossible songs’ I have heard, to utter something of the rhythm of life that has most touched me.” The next poems “will be daringly of the moment, vital with the life and passion of today, yet not a whit less romantic.” Three years passed before he was able to realize that objective in a burst of creativity in Rome. The “Epilogue” added to the sospiri section of Flower o’the Vine typifies the sensuousness that infused those poems but was absent in the volume’s first section, the romantic ballads of the 1888 volume. Influenced by the nude statuary in and around Rome and by the frank sexuality he experienced or, more likely, imagined during his walks on the Roman Campagna, the “beauty’ he sought in the sospiri poems included that of the human body framed by the beauty of the natural world. The two sections of Flower o’the Vine reflect what Sharp viewed as a progression from the elusive romanticism announced as a “new movement” in the 1888 “Preface” to the sensuality of the “Epilogue,” “daringly of the moment and vital with life and passion.” The very title of the volume, Flower o’the Vine, evokes Bacchus, who frequents the sospiri poems in various guises, among them the masculine but elusive Night beloved by the feminine Dusk in “Epilogue.” By mid-1892, Sharp had found a name for the transformation he experienced in Rome in 1891. The sospiri poems were an initial expression of the Paganism he would soon proclaim more directly in his Pagan Review.

15On April 23, Sharp thanked Thomas Janvier for his over-generous introduction to Flower o’the Vine, which he read in the proofs from the Webster firm:

I thank you most heartily for what you say there, which seems to me, moreover, if I may say so, at once generous, fittingly reserved, and likely to win attention. You yourself occupy such a high place in Letters oversea that such a recommendation of my verse cannot but result to my weal.

16He told Janvier he was trying to keep down his “too cosmopolitan acquaintanceship” in Paris and assured him that “after the second of May” he was “going to reform and remain reformed.” In the meantime, “after a week or so of the somewhat feverish Bohemianism of literary and artistic Paris, we shall be happy at our ‘gypsy’ encampment in the Forest of Fontainebleau.” The “we” implies Edith Rinder was with him both in Paris and at the “encampment.” If so, she must have returned home by May 2 when Elizabeth, having succeeded her husband as the paper’s London art critic, arrived to review the Salons for the Glasgow Herald. Sharp described for Janvier the beauty of Paris in the spring, mentioned a chance meeting with Paul Verlaine, and listed some of the writers and artists he was meeting:

I went round to Leon Vanier’s, where there were many of les Jeunes – Jean Moréas, Maurice Barrés, Cazalis, Renard, Eugène Holland, and others (including your namesake, Janvier). To-night I ought to go to the weekly gathering of a large number of les Jeunes at the Café du Soleil d’Or, that favourite meeting place now of les decadents, les symbolistes, and les everything else.

17He concluded by listing his plans for the rest of the year:

(1) Lill joins me in Paris about 10 days hence and remains to see the two Salons, etc.

(2) From the middle of May till the middle (14th) of July we shall be in London.

(3) Then Lill goes with friends to Germany, to Bayreuth (for Wagnerian joys) and I go afoot and aboat among the lochs and isles and hills of the western Scottish Highlands.

(4) We meet again in Stirling or Edinburgh, early in August – and then, having purchased or hired a serviceable if not a prancing steed, we go off for three weeks vagabondage. The steed is for Lill and our small baggage and a little tent. We’ll sometimes sleep out: sometimes at inns, or in the fern in Highlander’s cottages. Thereafter I shall again go off by myself to the extreme west “where joy and melancholy are one, and where youth and age are twins” as the Gaelic poet says.

(5) The rest of September visiting in Scotland.

(6) Part of October in London then (O Glad Tidings).

(7) Off for 6 months to the South: first to the Greek side of Sicily: then to Rome (about Xmas) for the Spring. Finally: a Poor-House in London.

18Few of those plans materialized. In early June, J. Stanley Little came upon a neighboring house available for leasing and thought the Sharps might find it suitable. They were staying with Mona Caird in Hampshire and planned to visit Bucks Green over the first weekend of June, but Elizabeth, on June 3, developed an extremely high fever, a relapse of the malaria she contracted in France in the spring. Sharp went alone to Bucks Green on Tuesday June 7, found the house desirable, and signed a three-year lease. When she was able to travel, Elizabeth visited the house which she described in the Memoir as

a little eight-roomed cottage, near Rudgwick, with a little porch, an orchard and garden, and small lawn with a chestnut tree in its midst…. [It] stood at the edge of a little hamlet called Bucks Green, and across the road from our garden gate stood the one shop flanked by a magnificent poplar tree, that made a landmark however far we might wander. It was a perpetual delight to us.

19In a history of Bucks Green, Roger Nash of the Rudgwick Preservation Society identified the house across from the shop on Guildford Road as the Toll House, a misleading name because it is not on the site of the house that collected tolls for using the road.

It was built in the curtilage of the smithy, first called Arun Villas, then The Laurels, then Phenice Croft, before its present post-war name [Toll House]. The name Phenice Croft (a place in Crete, referred to in the Bible) was given by William Sharp about 1892, who lived there somewhat secretly, for 2 years. He was a much travelled Scottish writer of a troubled disposition who invented his pseudonym ‘Fiona McCloud’ whilst in Bucks Green, writing a book titled Pharais. He was a friend of another literati, Stanley Little, who lived in Rudgwick rather longer, and at the time was lodging at Bucks Green Place. Both, I think, were drawn to the area by its Shelley connections.

Fig. 11a. Early 20th century photograph of Bucks Green, Rudgwick, Sussex. © Rudgwick Preservation Society. Courtesy of Roger Nash, Chair, Rudgwick Preservation Society, https://www.rudgwick-rps.org.uk

Fig. 11b. Mid-20th Century photograoph of Bucks Green, Rudgwick, Sussex. Phenice Croft, now the Toll House, is across the road from the building, now white, which housed the shop. ©The Francis Frith Collection, https://www.francisfrith.com/​bucks-green/​bucks-green-the-village-c1965_b587001

20Nash’s history includes this photograph of the “one shop” across the road from Phenice Croft, which dates from the early twentieth century, before the highway was paved and with the “magnificent poplar tree” described by Elizabeth Sharp, here denuded of its leaves. Below is a later photograph of the “one shop,” now painted white, with the poplar tree gone but the bare branches of the chestnut tree visible in the front lawn of Phenice Croft.

21According to Nash, “In 1890 James Stanley Little and his brother George Leon Little were borders in Bucks Green at The Kraal, a house in Lynwick St, now called The Old School House. In 1891, J Stanley Little lodged with William Kensett, a dairy farmer at Bucks Green Place, who was a near neighbor of the Sharps.” Nash speculated correctly that the Little brothers were in Rudgwick before Sharp, and may have influenced his arrival. It was only because Stanley Little found an available house the Sharps found suitable that they became residents of Bucks Green.

22For the remainder of June both Sharps corresponded regularly with Little about the house. On the twenty-second, he asked Little to please tell a man named Napper that “Mr. Sharp says he has nothing to do with any extra labour unauthorised by him, and that this engaging extra assistance without consulting him first, is a thing he will not tolerate again.” He also passed on rather specific instructions from Elizabeth:

She would like (if nothing has yet been done) if the paint of the stairway, landing, and doors belonging thereto be done in a dark red (Pompeian red) – of one colour only, instead of the two shades already approved to match the paper. The doors in the Hotel at Littlehampton are responsible for this change of view. Again, if the drawing room has not been gone on with, we would now like if the painting of the skirting, doors, and mantel piece be uniformly of the pale tint of yellow, instead of the pale and yellow, as first arranged – but the inside of the doorless cupboard to be entirely of the deeper shade of yellow.

23He told Little he expected “enter the house with the furniture about the 13th or 14th of July–just when E. goes away for a fortnight to Germany.” At the close of June 1892, the Sharps were set for a new phase of their lives in a house in rural Sussex. It was called “The Laurels,” but they rechristened it first “Kingscroft” in recognition of a former resident named King. Then they settled on “Phenice Croft” which combined the Greek name for the Phoenix, a unique bird that burned itself on a funeral pyre and rose from the ashes with renewed youth to live through another cycle, and the Scottish name for a rural cottage. The stage was set for “renewal” and the period of concentrated writing in which Sharp produced first The Pagan Review and then the early writings of Fiona Macleod.

Letters: January-June, 1892

To Richard Le Gallienne, January 6, 1892

24R.M.S. “Teutonic” | At Sea | 6th January/92

  • 1 For information about Le Gallienne, see Sharp’s letter to him in late February 1887.

25Dear Mr. Le Gallienne1

  • 2 Hall Caine, a disciple and biographer of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, was a close friend of Sharp’s in (...)
  • 3 The Book-Bills of Narcissus (Derby: Frank Murray, 1892.)
  • 4 Le Gallienne’s English Poems (London: Elkin Mathews and John Lane, 1892).

26Many thanks for your cordial greetings and friendly remembrance. I value both. (By the way, if you know – and should shortly see – Mr. Caine2 of the Mercury, please thank him for the kindly farewell-telegram I have just received.). I am delighted to have “Narcissus”3 with me, and value it none the less for your sister’s generous sacrifice: and I am also much pleased to learn that you are to bring out a new volume next March4 – for which I not only wish all success but hope to be able to give a further welcome to in the Academy or elsewhere (I shall be back before its appearance I hope: my present plan is to return before the end of February). In this connection I shd. add that my London letter-address is | 72 Inverness Terrace | Bayswater | W. It will give me sincere pleasure to receive your “Poems’ – but certainly not as a ‘makeweight’. I’ll be able to offer you a counter-courtesy by that time perhaps.

  • 5 Sharp’s Life and Letters of Joseph Severn (London: Sampson Lowe, Marston & Co: March, 1892).

27As for Severn5 – which cannot but interest you, from the nature of its contents – I believe it is to [be] published somewhere about the 20th next. It is an expensive book, and I am not sure whether S. Low and Co. will be liberal with review copies: but of course if you see your way to a special review, they would doubtless pay immediate attention to the accompanying request.

28With my cordial regards to you both – and all good wishes for 1892 –

29Sincerely yours, | William Sharp

30ALS University of Texas at Austin

To Louise Chandler Moulton, January 12, 1892

31R. M. S. Teutonic | C/o Thos. A. Janvier 20 Seventh Avenue | New York City | Tuesday 12th

32Chère Amie,

  • 6 Sharp visited Louise Chandler Moulton on January 26 or 27 while staying with the Scudders in Bosto (...)

33I daresay you have heard that I am to be out here for a few weeks (probably 3 weeks in and around New York and a few days at least in Boston).6 I am looking forward very much to seeing you, and hope you are to be in Boston during the coming weeks.

34I am glad to get away oversea for a bit, as I have been working pretty close recently. My long delayed Severn Memoirs are at last off my hands, and are to be issued in Gt. Britain and America somewhere about the end of this month I understand. The book contains a great deal of matter of interest to all students of literature, & will I think (and the publishers believe) go well all round. It is a very handsome book – though I speak without certain knowledge of its exterior – with several highly interesting illustrations and facsimiles etc.

  • 7 A Fellowe and His Wife (London: James R. Osgood, MacIlvain & Co., 1892, and Boston and New York: H (...)

35Another book that will be published simultaneously in U. S. A. and England in the Spring is the novel in which Blanche Willis Howard and I have collaborated.7 (I spent last Autumn in Stuttgart, to this end).

36Of course I have other things on hand: including a play which I hope will be out erelong.

  • 8 Phillip Marston’s A Last Harvest: Lyrics and Sonnets from the Book of Love, ed. Louise Chandler Mo (...)

37I reviewed Philip’s posthumous volume in the Academy a week or so ago.8 I hope it is at once honest and generous: I meant it to be both. It has given pleasure, I hear, to some of Philip’s truest admirers – and almost the last thing I heard before leaving London was the particular approbation of two such very different judges as Roden Noel and Robert Buchanan. The book touched me deeply in many ways: and I liked your graceful and tender preface.

38I think I shall go straight to the Stedmans on my arrival in New York tomorrow – but it is possible I may have to alter the dates of my promised visits. But in any case I am having all my correspondence (as I fancy I told you in my Xmas card) addressed to me | C/o Thos. A Janvier Esq | 20, Seventh Avenue | New York City

39Always affectionately yours | William Sharp.

40P.S. I forgot to say that Lillie is not with me. She has left Germany & is now in London, where I hope to join her sometime in latter half of Feby.

41ALS Library of Congress, Louise Chandler Moulton Collection

To Elizabeth A. Sharp, [January 18 or 19, 1892]

  • 9 Sharp is describing his meeting with Walt Whitman on January 16. E. A. S. said this meeting took p (...)

42… During a memorable talk on literature of the two countries past and to come, the conversation turned upon a vivid episode.9 “That was when you were young?” I asked. The patriarchal old poet – who lay in his narrow bed, with his white beard, white locks, and ashy-grey face in vague relief, in the afternoon light, against the white pillows and coverlet – looked at me before he answered, with that half audacious, wholly winsome glance so characteristic of him, “Now, just you tell me when you think that was!”

43Then, with sudden energy, and without waiting for a reply, he added, “Young? I’m as young now as I was then! What’s this grey tangle” (and as he spoke he gave his straggling beard an impatient toss), “and this decrepit old body got to do with that, eh? I never felt younger, and I’m glad of it – against what’s coming along. That’s the best way to shift camp, eh? That’s what I call Youth!”… He said to me with halting breath: “William Sharp when you go back to England, tell those friends of whom you have been speaking, and all others whom you may know and I do not that words fail me to express my deep gratitude to them for sympathy and aid truly enough beyond acknowledgment. Good-bye to you and to them – the last greetings of a tired old poet”.

44Memoir 193–94

To Horace Scudder, [January 21, 1892]10

  • 10 Horace Elisha Scudder (1838–1902) gained prominence and power on the American literary landscape w (...)

45137 West 78th Street | Thursday

46Dear Mr. Scudder,

47I am gratified by your friendly and courteous attention – and accept your invitation with sincere pleasure. As I have no wish to “gallivant” in Boston, but simply to attend to some business, and to call on one or two friends, nothing could suit me better. I was just writing to a correspondent to say that I wd. probably put up at the Parker House Hotel, when your letter came. The baggage I shall take with me will be of a portable kind – so I shall have no bother.

  • 11 Henry Mills Alden (1836–1919), a descendent of John and Priscilla Alden who arrived with the Mayfl (...)

48I will endeavour to leave New York by the 10 A. M. train – so as not to cause Mrs. Scudder any inconvenience: failing this being practicable (as I have to come from Metuchen N. J). I’ll come on by the 11 train. However, as I know that Mr. Alden11 goes early into town I am almost certain I can catch the former. If I miss it, I shall telegraph to Mrs. Scudder.

49I have to return to New York on Friday morning from Boston – possibly on Thursday morning.

50In haste, Sincerely Yours, | William Sharp

51P.S. Glad you are to use “Severn”. I think the matter will interest a wide circle. Mrs. Stedman reciprocates your kind greetings. E. C. S. has gone to Philadelphia.

52ALS Harvard Houghton

To Louise Chandler Moulton, January 21, [1892]12

  • 12 Letter dated by postmark.

53Just time for a hurried P/C. No, of course, chère amie, there is no misunderstanding. I shall be frantically hurried in Boston, but I’ll make a point of seeing you – Probably on Wednesday forenoon or possibly Tuesday afternoon.

54W. S.

55Max O’Reilly’s daughter still an invalid, but better, and able to sit up. Mrs. S. sends her love. E.C.S. has gone to Philadelphia.

56ACS Louise Chandler Moulton Collection, Library of Congress

To Arthur Stedman, [January 22?, 1892]13

  • 13 Arthur Stedman, E. C. Stedman’s son, served as Sharp’s agent in dealing with C. L. Webster & Co., (...)

57137 West 78th Street.

58My dear Arthur,

59I am much indebted to you, not only for your trouble as to the prompt delivery of the letter, but for your potent friendly services in the negotiation with Messrs. Webster & Co. The terms seem to me to be very good, and fair to all concerned: and I gladly accept. I’ll arrange later with you about title, for neither “Romantic Ballads” nor “Sospiri di Roma” will now serve. I think I shd. like some such title as “Flower o’ The Vine” with the under-motto “Earth is my Vineyard: these grew there”. Browning.

60I think also that the Preface to “Romantic Ballads” shd. be omitted. The reprint should be from the 2nd edition: a copy of which it so happens I brought out for you – as I do not think you have it. The improvements upon the first are very marked, and there is another poem (“The Isle of Lost Dreams”). It, too, is now rare.

  • 14 F. J. Hall was an editor at C. L. Webster & Co. and responsible for the negotiations with Arthur S (...)
  • 15 Thomas A. Janvier.

61On reconsideration – if you are agreeable (and I told Mr. Hall14 that either Mr. Janvier15 or Mr. Bliss Carman would act as my “best man”) – I think that I wd. much rather it were done by Carman. Janvier knows nothing of poetry, and cares less, though he is good enough to express himself warmly about my verse. Carman is a poet, keenly sympathetic, critical, and judicious – and his name, moreover, is much better known than perhaps he himself is aware.

62Moreover, he has agreed to revise any proofs for me: and this arduous task I am going to entrust to his friendly care.

63Please let me know if you and Mr. Hall agree to the title of “Flowers o’ The Vine”, and to Bliss Carman as ‘introducer’.

  • 16 Stedman had asked Sharp to be his guest at a dinner meeting of the Author’s Club on Thursday, Janu (...)

64I am afraid, cher ami, that I cannot possibly get back in time for the Author’s Club. I have so much to do with Houghton & Co. etc.16

65I leave Alden’s early on Monday morning, so as to get to Boston by the early evening. There my address will be c/o Horace E. Scudder | 17 Buckingham St. | Cambridge | (Mass). I think it is very likely I shall go to a hotel for the evening of Tuesday the 2nd – so as to run less risk of missing my steamer on Wednesday morning. In this case, I shd. like to spend the evening with you better than with anyone else. I could say good-bye to Mrs. Stedman earlier in the day, and perhaps you would dine with me as my guest, at the Century?

66Ever, my dear fellow, | Cordially yours, | William Sharp

67ALS Columbia

To Arthur Stedman, [January 26, 1892]

68C/o Horace E. Scudder, | 17 Buckingham St | Cambridge | Tuesday

69My dear Arthur,

70All right – I’ll write to Janvier and see if I can persuade him.

  • 17 Leaves of Grass: Including Sands at Seventy, 1st Annex, Goodbye My Fancy, 2nd Annex: A Backward Gl (...)
  • 18 David McKay (1860–1918,) a Scotsman, established a publishing firm in Philadelphia in 1882: The Da (...)

71The “Green” edition of Whitman was to be published yesterday (Monday).17 Mr. McKay18 got me the first bound copy as a favour – as I wanted to get it for you. I could not get one for myself, though the other edn. served my purpose just as well. I understood from Mr. McKay that this is only a new edition to please a fancy of W. W’.s – and that as it does not contain any new matter it would not be sent out to the press. I also understood – though perhaps mistakenly – that this “Green” edition is a limited one.

72I am going to leave here on Thursday morning; but have probably to break somewhere enroute. If I should be able to go to New York same evening I shall telegraph to you – as in that case I should like to avail myself of your kind suggestion, and put up for the night at your house, if such an arrangement can be made without inconveniencing you (and of course, cher ami, I go there on my own account).

73In haste, | Sincerely yours, | William Sharp

74P.S. On reconsideration of my plans it is highly likely that I shall get to New York on Thursday evening – but not till late, and certainly not in time for the Author’s Club. I find that all idea of postponing my departure must be given up – in fact, if I could manage it I should go home on Saty – for I have just heard of the sudden and tragic death of my brother Edward. My mother is profoundly affected: and I want to see her as soon as I can.

75W. S.

76ALS Pierpont Morgan

To Laura Hyde Stedman, [January 27, 1892]

7717 Buckingham St. | Cambridge | Mass. | Wednesday Night

78Dear Mrs. Stedman

79Just a hurried line to tell you that I leave here tomorrow instead of Friday – though I shall not inconvenience you by turning up before Friday night. I want to be in New York to conclude all my arrangements, as there is now no chance of my prolonging my stay, as I had nominally arranged with the shipping Co. to do if I found it advisable: indeed, were it practicable – which it is not – I should sail earlier. For I have just received news of the sudden and tragic death of my brother Edward: and I wish to get home as soon as possible.

  • 19 Irene Jones Harland was the widow of a very successful New York lawyer and the mother of Henry Har (...)

80I had a delightful time in Philadelphia, and have also enjoyed my stay here: but I am looking forward to returning to your hospitable care, where I feel so much at home, and where my affections are so strongly placed. Sunday I have of course kept free so that I should at least get some glimpses of Mr. Stedman. On Saturday night I have promised to dine with Mrs. Harland.19 I shall have to say good-bye sometime on Tuesday.

81I shall probably be at Arthur’s tomorrow (Thursday) night.

82Ever affectionately yours, | William Sharp

83ALS Columbia

To Horace Scudder, [January 29, 1892]20

  • 20 Sharp returned to New York from his three-day stay in Cambridge with the Scudders on January 28, 1 (...)

84… prolonged strain of this twelfth one is alarming her as well as trying her physically. She keeps repeating over and over her wish to be at home once more. I gave them all manner of kind messages from you – tho’ I doubt if Mrs. Alden quite understood. I’ll try and call again before I go, and shall let you hear how she is. I expect to see Mr. Alden in any case. I fear that you, too, have suffered some loss – for I saw in the Boston Herald today that a Judge Scudder, “cousin of the novelist Horace E. Scudder” died yesterday.

  • 21 Sharp had planned to stay a week in Boston and prolong his stay in America, but while staying with (...)

85I am so sorry to have had to cut short my stay at Cambridge21 – but I carry away with me the pleasantest recollections, and shall always think of you and yours with sincere regard and that happy sense of intimacy which is the fragrance of friendship.

86Again thanking you for all your considerate hospitality, & best remembrances to you all,

87In haste, | William Sharp

88ALS Washington University Libraries

To Horace Scudder, January 29, 189222

  • 22 This is a business letter Sharp wrote to Scudder to ask if he would like to consider two articles (...)

89C/o Edmund Clarence Stedman | 137 West 78th Street | New York City | 29:1:92

90Dear Mr. Scudder,

  • 23 An article by Sharp entitled “La Jeune Belgique” was published in Nineteenth Century, 34 (Sept. 18 (...)

91Do you think that, later on, you would care for two articles – one on the new literary movement in Belgium and one on the most recent French achievement in belles-lettres? I can fairly claim to be a specialist here, and to be in a position to know what has been done both by La Jeune Belgique and La Jeune France – what is being done – and what tendencies are obvious or predictable.23

92It has occurred to me that a work of this kind wd. be artful and suggestive as well as welcome to many – and I am writing also to Messrs. Houghton Mifflin & Co. to see if they care to entertain the idea for ultimate book-publication.

  • 24 There follows a list of sixty-five Belgian and French writers.

93Of course, writing away from my notes and material, I can give you only a tentative list of the more or less notable authors, who, in some degrees manifest the “new modernity” of which so much is heard. But here is a tentative list, which for convenience I shall give alphabetically. The names with an asterisk are members of La Jeune Belgique: and those with an X are of men recently dead.24

94No doubt I have omitted one or two names – but I don’t think my memory has played me a trick in any important instance. (Of course the late Theodore di Banville is scarcely within the group).

95I have taken my passage by the Majestic, and sail on the morning of Wednesday (or late evening of Tuesday).

96Sincerely Yours | William Sharp

97P.S. On reconsideration I shall wait till I hear from you, before I lay the book-idea before Messrs. Houghton Mifflin & Co. The book would consist of the articles much amplified and rearranged – with translations in rhythmic prose of representative poems by each author (sometimes several): with biographical and critical pastels etc.

98Perhaps, indeed, you could broach the matter from this letter.

99W. S.

100ALS Harvard Houghton

To Arthur Stedman, [February 2?, 1892]25

  • 25 Sharp was at the publisher’s office and wrote to Stedman on the firm’s letterhead.

101Charles L. Webster & Co., Publishers | 67 Fifth Avenue, New York

102My dear Arthur

103Just been at your rooms, and missed you by a brief time. (I left an invitation-note for you from somebody, which your mother asked me to give you).

  • 26 Possibly Daniel McIntyre Henderson, a Scottish poet and bookseller who emigrated to the U. S. A. i (...)
  • 27 Horace Traubel (1858–1919), editor, biographer, and poet, is best known for his friendship with Wa (...)
  • 28 Joseph Marshall Stoddart (1845–1921) was the editor of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine and a friend (...)
  • 29 Possibly Francis James Child (1825–1896), who became the first Professor of English Literature at (...)

104The most friendly & generously worded letter which you addressed to Walt Whitman on my account is safely in my hands. By the way, it seems that its non-receipt by me is, so far as your father is concerned, entirely my own fault. He says he explicitly told me that it was waiting me at Mr. Henderson’s.26 Unfortunately, I had to go to Mr. Traubel’s27 first, so as to catch him ere his bank closed: then I was detained sometime by Mr. Stoddart28 at Mr. Child’s:29 and by that time Mr. Henderson’s office was closed. Saturday morning I was engaged with Mr. Stoddart, & while on my way to Mr. Henderson’s learned from Mr. Traubel that if I were to see Walt Whitman at all I must go down before the afternoon. By the time that, accompanied by my fair companion (tautological, but never mind) I had returned to Philadelphia, I found that as it was Saturday, business places had all closed early. Hence my not seeing Mr. Henderson at all.

105Your father seems to me sadly nervous and overwrought. I fear the strain of lecturing & going about so much is telling upon him. He ought to have a complete rest.

106I want to talk to you about the Brown-Paper copy of Whitman. This morning your father told me he particularly wished me to have this duplicate copy, as a present from him and as a remembrance of W. W. Now it occurred to me that in the first place this copy, or the other, may possibly have been meant by W. W. for you – and, in the next, that in any case you will wish to retain it, as it is a privately bound one. If so, I shd. most certainly wish you to remain its possessor. But you know your father, & you see my difficulty. I want your frank advice on the matter, by which I will abide.

  • 30 F. J. Hall. See note to January 22, 1892 letter to Arthur Stedman.

107Will you kindly tell Mr. Hall30 (who is out) that Janvier will write a brief Introduction to my Poems, but that of course he will expect some honorarium as he has so many important commissions on hand, and cannot afford his valuable time for nothing. I also wanted to ask Mr. Hall

108(1) When he will print and issue the book

109(2) When he will want Janvier’s Introduction

110(3) What about the title

111By the way I want North and South to appear somewhere: say “Of The North”, “Of The South”: I don’t mean in the title – but on title-page or on second leaf or Contents.

112(4) What about the Romantic Ballads “Preface” (the vol. must be printed from the 2ndEdition).

113(5) What about a brief Preface to “Sospiri”

114(6) Shall fully set-up Proofs be sent to me – or do you not wish to send proofs oversea.

115(7) Can I have some author’s copies sent to me in England? Also on what terms I can buy copies if I want more, for English friends, at any time.

116If you can come in tomorrow evening perhaps you may be in a position to inform me concerning these points.

117Yours ever, | William Sharp

118P.S. In thanking you again for your Whitman letter I may assure you that no hint escaped me concerning the private projects confided to me.

119ALS Columbia

To Laura Hyde Stedman, February 3, 1892

120R. M. S “MAJESTIC” | Wednesday, February 3, 1892

121Dear Mrs. Stedman,

122A hurried last word, per the pilot, to thank you again for all your many kindnesses – one of the pleasantest of the many pleasant remembrances I carry away. Your house has indeed been my home in the happiest sense of the word.

123Adieu, | W. S.

  • 31 J. W. Young, a student or faculty member at Harvard, wrote a letter to Stedman asking if he would (...)

124If I have left Mr. J. W. Young’s31 letter (to E.C.S. about my lecturing) will you kindly send it to me. 72 Inverness Terrace | Bayswater | London W.

125ALS Columbia

To Laura Hyde Stedman, [February 13, 1892]

12672 Inverness Terrace | Bayswater, London W.

127Dear Mrs. Stedman,

128I was unable to write to you on the voyage, as it was a frightful passage, and as, moreover, I was very unwell the whole time I was on board. But I am safe at home again, and find my wife well, I am thankful to say. Tomorrow morning I go off to Edinburgh to see my mother, but shall be north only a few days. As soon as I am back, if not before, I shall write you a letter with all news. Meanwhile my love to you and Mr. Stedman and to Arthur, and kind remembrances to Miss Coleman.

129Ever sincerely yours, | William Sharp

130I may add that the latest news of Harry Harland is distinctly more favourable.

131ACS Columbia

To Arthur Stedman, [February 16?, 1892]

1322 Coltbridge Terrace | Murrayfield | Edinburgh

133My dear Arthur,

  • 32 Flower o' the Vine (1892).

134Many thanks for your letter just received, and for all your trouble in the matter of the poems.32

  • 33 Although Sharp considered publishing the short dramatic works under a pseudonym, the volume finall (...)

135But let me explain at once, my dear fellow, that you are under some misapprehension when you say that my reticence about my dramatic volume was “shabby”. You did not clearly gather what I said, or all I said. If you had, you would have understood that there is no question of conflicting interests. What I told you was that I had written some new things in a new dramatic form33 – but that I was not to publish them in the ordinary way: but simply going to have a certain number of copies printed for distribution – and, moreover, under a pseudonym. Had I intended to publish a new book, either of verse or of any imaginative work, I should certainly have told you about it at once.

136I have my own reasons for wishing to issue them in this way in the first instance. They are new in method and manner, and are, I believe, the best work of the kind I can do. Work of this kind is so dear to me that I am relatively indifferent to its financial success: and, in addition, I am particularly curious to see how these “Dramatic Vistas” will be received, without any of the bias for or against involved in the attachment of my name to them.

137So now you understand, no doubt. I may add that when I was in Boston I dropped some hint about this matter, though not nearly as explicitly as I have done to you – but sufficiently to make Houghton Mifflin wishful to take up the little book either at once or later: but here I at once “drew off”, for by that time you had come forward about “Sospiri” etc., and I felt that I could conclude or suggest no agreement without giving C. Webster & Co. first option. I could not explain all this before Janvier etc. the last night at your rooms: and then, too, I thought you understood the semi-private nature of my projected venture.

138To convince you that I am not playing with words, I may add that I, for my part, am quite willing that Messrs. Webster & Co. take up this little book if they wish to do so, and be its publishers both in America and Great Britain. If so I should print privately only 100 copies, for private distribution to individuals and to “critical organs”, and set forth as by “H. P. Siwäarmill” (my anagram – which I tell you in strict confidence). When issued from a publishing house either in the late Spring or in the Autumn it can go forth as by “William Sharp” and probably with a suggestive ‘forward’ from myself.

139The little book will occupy about 100 pages. It will be called “Dramatic Vistas”: and, on Front-Page, Dramatic Vistas, with “The Passing of Lilith”. The Contents comprise the following pieces, all, with the exception of the imaginative visionary “Lilith”, studies in various phrases of what I may call spiritual terror.

  1. The Passion of Père Hilarion
  2. The Birth of A Soul
  3. A Northern Night
  4. Finis
  5. The Hazard of Melchior Van Holk
  6. The Black Madonna
  7. The Lute Player
  8. The Passing of Lilith

140I had time to read a portion of above to only two friends in America. Had you been alone the last night, I was going to have shown you a couple of pieces, and spoken to you about them. If you wish to know anything about them you can refer to Mrs. Janvier or to Bliss Carman. The pieces they heard are | The Birth of A Soul | Finis | The Passing of Lilith | (and Mrs Janvier also “A Northern Night”).

141Bliss Carman seemed profoundly impressed by what he heard. If you do speak to either you can adduce my authority.

142Once more, if you do take it up you could, if you prefer, postpone “Flower o’ The Vine” till the Autumn.

143So now, my dear boy, you see I am both willing and ready to meet you half way: and after this explanation trust you will remove the charge of shabbiness – which has hurt me somewhat, and would have hurt me a good deal more if I did not understand how the misapprehension arose.

  • 34 (Henry) Austin Dobson (1840–1921), poet, essayist, and biographer, entered government service with (...)

144I return to London the day after tomorrow, and very shortly thereafter shall call on Austin Dobson34 and give him your book. We have taken pleasant rooms in Kensington, at Bedford Gdns, in Campden Hill – but you had best not be confused with any other address then the permanent letter-address I gave you,

145We had a horrible passage – and I was ill a good part of the way. Even now, nearly a week after arrival in England, I am not quite myself again.

  • 35 A portion of the manuscript is unreadable here. When the book appeared it was dedicated “To Edmund (...)

146By the way, I forget if I told you that I want to dedicate “Flowers o’ The Vine” to…35 or do you think something a little more elaborate would be better?

147Just going off to hunt in some of the old Edinburgh bookshops for errant “Whitmans”. I don’t expect success right off – but, patience!

  • 36 Regarding the death of Sharp’s brother.

148Please give my love to your father and mother. Tell the latter that I gave her kind message of sympathy to my mother.36 Also her messages to my wife about my being just a model husband, and having been a very ‘good boy’.

149Yours Ever, my dear fellow, | William Sharp

150ALS Columbia

To J. D. Marshall, February 19, 1892

15172 Inverness Terrace | Bayswater, London W. | 19: Feby: 92

152Dear Sir,

153I meant to write to you recently while I was the guest of Mr. Edmund Clarence Stedman in New York, but my stay in America was abruptly cut short owing to private bereavement at home.

  • 37 Edgar Fawcett(1847–1904) was a successful novelist Sharp met in New York. His best known novels – (...)
  • 38 James Clarence Harvey (1859–1917) was a poet.
  • 39 A Fellowe and His Wife (1892).
  • 40 There is no evidence of such a commission.

154I was given your name and address by several friends, as that of a firm likely to want such literary work as I have to dispose of. I do not know if my name and repute as novelist and general writer be known to you – if not I could refer you to Mr. Stedman, or to Mr. Edgar Fawcett,37 or many others – and I may add Mr. J. Clarence Harvey,38 Editor of Lovells’ series, who reissued my romance Children of Tomorrow. I may further add that Messrs. Houghton, Mifflin and Co. in Boston, and Messrs. Osgood McIlvaine and Co. in Gt. Britain, will early in March publish a novel which I have written in collaboration with Blanche Willis Howard39 – and that another leading American house has commissioned another novel.40

155May I ask if you have room for short stories of say 5 to 6,000 words: and what rates of payment you can offer.

  • 41 “Primavera di Capri,” Good Words, 33 (1892), 396–411.

156Just before leaving New York I had an offer from a New York syndicate – but the terms were not such as made me particularly anxious to agree. I have nothing quite new at the moment ready to send to you – and in any case prefer to wait till I hear from you: but by this post I forward to you, a duplicate set of proofs of an Italian story of some length which is to come out in an early number (probably April) of Good Words.41 Possibly you may be able to do something with it in the meantime.

157Yours faithfully, | William Sharp

158J. D. Marshall, The American Press Association

159ALS Pierpont Morgan

To Thomas Janvier, [February 20?, 1892]

160Dear Old Man,

  • 42 Janvier’s The Uncle of an Angel, and Other Stories (1891).
  • 43 “Editor’s Study,” Harper’s, 84 (Feb. 1892), 478–79.

161I have read your stories (as I wrote the other day) with particular pleasure, apart from personal associations.42 You have a delicate and delightful touch that is quite your own, and all in all I for my part fully endorse what Mr. Howells43 wrote about you recently in Harpers’ and said as emphatically in private. So – amico caro – “go in and win!”

162I am settling down in London for a time, and am more content to abide awhile now that the writing mood is at last upon me again – and strong at that!

163I have not yet put my hand to any of the commissioned stories I must soon turn to – but tell la sposa that I have finished my “Dramatic Vistas” (two or three of which I read to her), and even venture to look with a certain half-content upon the last of the series – “The Lute-Player” – which has been haunting me steadily since last October, but which I could not express aright till the other day….

164Memoir 195

To Laura Hyde Stedman, February 23, 1892

16511 Bedford Garden | Campden Hill, London W |. 23: Feby: 92

166My dear Mrs. Stedman

167Now that I am settled down again to my London life, my American visit seems to me almost like a dream – though much more vivid than any dream is my remembrance of all the kindness and thoughtfulness of you and yours. My wife is almost as grateful as I am, for I have told her so much about you all. She is delighted, too, to have so good a report of my doings, and to know on your authority that I was “so good a boy” during my stay in America.

168By this time you will have Mr. Stedman at home again – which will be pleasant for both. It grieved me to see him so sorely overwrought: but I suppose it is part of the penalty he has to pay for his personal and public popularity. I trust he attended to his business in Philadelphia, and did not “go gallivantin” with fascinating young authoresses! I could tell you sad tales about his misdoings – but I spare his feelings, and yours!

169We have taken rooms in Kensington, in a part known distinctively as the artists’ quarter: and as my wife has many friends close by, and is herself painting in a friend’s studio, I think she likes it better than Hampstead – at any rate until the Spring [it] is really un fait accompli.

170We are also going to rent a cottage or small house somewhere in the country – probably at a place a few miles north of Cookham Dene and the Woods of Waldegrave. Here we shall put all our stored furniture, and either live in it for weeks at a time, or for a day or two as the humour takes us, or either of us. If you and Mr. Stedman come we’ll have a picnic there in a neighbourhood hallowed to poets by memories of Shelley and others on to Matthew Arnold.

171Alas for the vanities of Christian Science! Tell Miss Coleman that if she is going to cross the Atlantic I would recommend her to supply herself with some material remedy against seasickness as well.

  • 44 Henry and Aline Merriam Harland; Irene Jones Harland. See note to Sharp’s letter to Laura Stedman (...)
  • 45 Austin Dobson, Eighteenth Century Vignettes, 3 vols. (1892–1896).

172We dined last Sunday with the Harlands and his mother,44 who arrived a few days after I did. Harry strikes me as worse. He is very weak, and most despondent: and I fear his term of life cannot be a long one. And yet a good deal of his trouble is due to a form of nervous hysteria: and it is just possible that a change of climate and cessation from excitement of any kind may benefit him. He and Aline and his mother leave London in a week for the South of France or the Riviera. I have seen almost no one since my return, having been busy: but either today or tomorrow I hope to call on Austin Dobson and give all your remembrances and Arthur’s copy of his “Biographies”.45

173My wife sends you both her warmest regards (and special thanks to Mr. Stedman for his portrait, which now ornaments our drawing room mantelpiece, in company with George Meredith). And you know that I am always affectionately yours,

174William Sharp

175ALS Columbia

To Arthur Stedman, [March 7, 1892]

17611 Bedford Gardens, Campden Hill | Kensington, W.

177Cher Ami

  • 46 John Charles Van Dyke (1856–1932) was a prolific writer on art and art history.
  • 47 Principles of Art: Part I: Art in History; Part II: Art in Theory (1887).

178Will you kindly obtain for me, and send, a little book called “How To Judge of a Picture” by John Van Dyke,46 pubd. by The Chautauqua Press (New York: Phillips & Hunt). I forget if you have any small fund of mine in hand: if not let me know amount to remit. If the same author’s “Principles of Art”47 is not more than a $ 1 or $ 1.50 please send it also. They are for my wife, and she will be greatly obliged to you.

179In haste, Yours ever, [W. S.]

180ACS Columbia

To J. Stanley Little, [March 9, 1892]

18111 Bedford Gardens | Campden Hill | Kensington W.

  • 48 James Stanley Little, who was educated at King’s College Cambridge, lived for a time with his brot (...)

182My dear Little,48

  • 49 Possibly The Library Review, published from 1892–1893.

183On my return from America I find among my letters and magazines etc. a copy of the first number of “The Library”.49 I have read your sensible and right article with much appreciation: and I hope many readers will take it to heart.

184Are you ever in town on Friday or Saturday afternoons? One of these days is likeliest for the finding me at my club (the Grosvenor, New Bond St).: or if ever this way you might chance finding us at home, though but a bare chance. We’ll be in these rooms till the end of April.

185Do you know of any cottages or small houses to be let unfurnished at your place or in your neighbourhood? We are looking out for something, say with 2 sitting rooms, 4 bedrooms etc.: at a moderate rental, and not too far from a station. We would put our stored furniture in: and we could go to it for a few weeks at a time, or two or three months, or a Friday till Monday, as the spirit moved us.

  • 50 George Léon Little (1862–1941).

186I might run down some afternoon to see anything, and to have a long chat with you and your brother Léon50 if this would not inconvenience you? What is he doing just now? I admire his work greatly, and hope much from him. And yourself? Busy no doubt. Pour moi, I am as hard at work as usual.

  • 51 I have been unable to identify her.

187From what my wife tells me, I fancy that either a letter from you concerning, or a book by Miss Vartz Smith,51 came for me & was sent to New York. I returned sooner than I intended, and my ‘postages’ are slowly finding me by different routes and directions and after long delays. By the way, I suppose your brother & you are still together at Bucks Green?

188Cordially yours | William Sharp

189ALS Princeton

To Edmund Clarence Stedman, April 13, 1892

19016 Winchester Road | Swiss Cottage, London N. W. | 13th April 92

191Master and Friend, All hail!

192Just a hurried line ere my departure for some weeks to France. The “old Adam” calls me, and alas I am weak!

  • 52 Walt Whitman died on March 26, 1892.
  • 53 “Walt Whitman,” The Athenaeum, 96 (April 2, 1892), 436–37. Watt’s lengthy article on Whitman damne (...)

193A thousand thanks for your welcome letter, I am glad you like “A Fellowe and His Wife”. Here it is going famously. In tonight’s paper I have been reading your beautiful memorial lines on Whitman which accompanied the wreath you sent.52 Every one here is heartily disgusted at the ungracious and ungentlemanly signed article in The Athenaeum a week or so ago, by Theodore Watts.53 How he could so far forget himself I don’t understand. Certainly the article will do him a lot of harm, and even those who broadly agree with his estimate of Whitman resent his arrogant and ill-bred tirade. It is a great pity everyway, and as one of T. W’.s friends I am doubly sorry.

  • 54 Henry Harland.

194The last news of Harland54 are [sic] perhaps somewhat better. But I won’t see him just now, as he is at Biarritz, and I am not going beyond Fontainebleau. My wife has gone with friends to the Isle of Wight for a week or so, but will join me in Paris some three weeks hence.

195I hope to read the two Poetry papers before long, and am looking forward to them greatly.

196My love to Mrs Stedman – but do not let her know that I am a backslider, as she already has but an indifferent opinion of my much tried virtue. I really am going to reform – but “owing to unavoidable circumstances” must not begin all at once or too hurriedly!

197We’ll be here in the summer. In the early autumn Lill and I are going through the West Highlands on horseback and on foot – a gipsy life for a few weeks, full of charm. Then, in October, we hope to sail to Sicily (the Greek side) and stay there till about Xmas – and then to Rome again.

198Love to you dear friend – to you and yours –

199Ever gratefully and affectionately, | William Sharp

200ALS Columbia

To Charles Webster & Co., [mid April, 1892]

201Address till middle of July | 16 Winchester Road | Swiss Cottage | London N. W. 2

202Dear Sirs

203Herewith the proofs of second part of Flower o’the Vine. Also, the MS. of the Epilogue to Sospiri di Roma. I do not, of course, expect to see Proofs of this Epilogue, and Mr. Arthur Stedman (to whom I am also writing) will no doubt read them carefully with the original for me. Only, I may add, that I must request (to which I am sure you will agree, even if on no other ground than as a favour) that this Epilogue on no account be omitted.

204I hope to write to you early next week about sale of copies here. Meanwhile I may say that there are difficulties of all kinds in the way if Flower o’ the Vine consist merely of reprints. But with the textual revisions, the inclusion of “The Last Voyage of Keir” in the first Section, and of the Epilogue to Sospiri in the second, these difficulties will be greatly overcome. In any case, of course, I did not mean to let Sospiri appear again without the Epilogue – which, to my mind, is one of the most essential things in the book.

205I think it would be as well, from every point of view, (as, certainly, to my personal advantage) to indicate somewhere that this Reprint of Romantic Ballads = the Third Edition, and of Sospiri di Roma = the Second.

206By the way, if you have not already done so, it does not matter about the inclusion in Part I of the small pieces “The Coves of Crail” and “Valleys of Dream”: in any case, they are essential, as is the “Epilogue to Sospiri”.

207Contents-Page will have now to be rectified of course.

  • 55 Alfred Austin (1835–1913), a political journalist who succeeded Tennyson as poet laureate in 1895, (...)

208I think I have already noted that I want the original Alfred Austin55 dedication to Sospiriomitted – and simply a blank page with “N’être que toi, mon Rêve”

  • 56 The rest of the manuscript is missing.

209I sent you some useful “Press Opinions” the other day – both British & American, & relating to both Romantic Ballads and Sospiri. The best about the former you will find at end of the Edition you have printed from. I have just found another American one (there were only 2 or 3 altogether) – viz: from the Boston Literary World (concerning Romantic Ballads).56

210ALS Columbia

To J. Stanley Little, [mid-April, 1892]

211Grand Hotel | Paris

212My dear Little,

213Thanks for your letter. There is no man to whom I would more freely depute any work of mine than to yourself – but at present my wife is doing my art-work for me, and for the brief time when she will be with me in Paris, a definite arrangement which cannot now be broken has already been made. It is very likely, however, that I may have important art-work to depute for a long period, beginning next autumn. More of this again.

  • 57 Probably The Literary World of April 9, 1892 in which Sharp’s and Blanche Willis Howard’s A Fellow (...)

214No, I have not yet seen the L. W.57 notice. No doubt it will come to me – and I thank you cordially in advance. A charming review has reached me from an important daily – & several flatteringly good ones from America and the Continent.

  • 58 Sharp mentions later (see letter 151) a “Summer Shows” article written by Little for the West Suss (...)

215I doubt if any of the Reviews wd. take a Summer Shows article58 – but it is always worthwhile trying. I have been so busy since I came here that I have seen or read nothing.

216Ever yours, | (in haste) | W. S.

217ALS Princeton

To Thomas Janvier, April 23, 1892

218Paris, 23rd April, 1892.

  • 59 Introduction to Flower o’ the Vine (1892).
  • 60 Jean Moréas (1856–1910) was the name taken by Iannis Pappadiamantopoulos, a Greek poet who adopted (...)

219… Many thanks for your letter, my dear fellow, and for the “Introduction”, which I have just read.59 I thank you most heartily for what you say there, which seems to me, moreover, if I may say so, at once generous, fittingly reserved, and likely to win attention. You yourself occupy such a high place in Letters oversea that such a recommendation of my verse cannot but result to my weal. I have been so deep in work and engagements, that I have been unable to attend to any correspondence of late – and have, I fear, behaved somewhat churlishly to friends across the water, and particularly to my dear friends in 7th Avenue. But now the pressure of work is over for the moment: my London engagements or their ghosts are vainly calling to me d’Outre-Manche: I am keeping down my too cosmopolitan acquaintanceship in Paris to the narrowest limit: and on and after the second of May am going to reform and remain reformed. If you don’t object to a little “roughing”, you would enjoy being with me and mes camarades this coming week. We like extremes, so after a week or so of the somewhat feverish Bohemianism of literary and artistic Paris, we shall be happy at our “gipsy” encampment in the Forest of Fontainebleau (at a remote and rarely visited but lovely and romantic spot between the Gorge de Frenchard and the Gorge d’Apremont). Spring is now here in her beauty: and there is a divine shimmer of green everywhere. Paris itself is en fete with her vividly emerald limes and sycamores, and the white and red spires of the chestnuts must make the soul of the west wind that is now blowing rejoice with gladness. The Seine itself is of a paler green than usual and is suggestive of those apple-hued canals and conduits of Flanders and by the “dead cities” of north-east Holland. I forget if you know Paris – but there is one of its many fountains that has an endless charm for me: that across the Seine, between the Quai des Grands Augustins and the Bld. St. Germain – the Fontaine St. Michel – I stood watching the foaming surge and splash of it for some time yesterday, and the pearl-grey and purple-based doves that flew this way and that through the sunlit spray. It brought, as it always does, many memories of beloved Rome and Italy back to me. I turned – and saw Paul Verlaine beside me: and I was in Paris again, the Paris of Paris, the Aspasia of the cities of the World, the only city whom one loves and worships (and is betrayed by) as a woman. Then I went round to Leon Vanier’s, where there were many of les Jeunes – Jean Moréas, Maurice Barrés, Cazalis, Renard, Eugène Holland, and others (including your namesake, Janvier).60 To-night I ought to go to the weekly gathering of a large number of les Jeunes at the Café du Soleil d’Or, that favourite meeting place now of les decadents, les symbolistes, and les everything else. But I can’t withstand this flooding sunshine, and sweet wind, and spraying of waters, and toss-toss and shimmer-shimmer of blossoms and leaves; so I’ll probably be off. This won’t be off if I don’t shut up in a double sense.

  • 61 Catherine Janvier.

220My love to “Kathia”61 and to you, dear fellow Pagans.

221Ever yours rejoicingly, | William Sharp

222P.S. – Tell K. that when I have “reformed” I’ll write to her. Don’t let her be impertinent, and say that this promise will be fulfilled ad Graecas Kalendas!

223Here are my proposed “coming-movements”:

  1. Lill joins me in Paris about 10 days hence, and remains to see the two Salons, etc.
  2. From the middle of May till the middle (14th) of July we shall be in London.
  3. Then Lill goes with friends to Germany, to Bayreuth (for Wagnerian joys) and I go afoot and aboat among the lochs and isles and hills of the western Scottish Highlands.
  4. We meet again in Stirling or Edinburgh, early in August – and then, having purchased or hired a serviceable if not a prancing steed, we go off for three weeks vagabondage. The steed is for Lill and our small baggage and a little tent. We’ll sometimes sleep out: sometimes at inns, or in the fern in Highlander’s cottages. Thereafter I shall again go off by myself to the extreme west “where joy and melancholy are one, and where youth and age are twins” as the Gaelic poet says.
  5. The rest of September visiting in Scotland.
  6. Part of October in London then (O Glad Tidings)
  7. Off for 6 months to the South: first to the Greek side of Sicily: then to Rome (about Xmas) for the Spring. Finally: a Poor-House in London.

224Memoir 195–98

To Edmund Clarence Stedman, April 23 [1892]

225Paris 23rd April

  • 62 Stedman wrote a poem about Walt Whitman following his death that was published in the United State (...)

226Letters from England have reached me just in time for a hurried acknowledgment by P/C – if I am to catch the outgoing mail of this week-end. Many thanks for your note and enclosure (Your kind letter I have already acknowledged) The W. W.62 farewell lines are just what the old poet would have wished: & that is the best praise. I am so glad to have them, & insert in my copy of W. from you. Anytime Arthur is writing – or if you could simply put another slip in an envelope – my wife wd. be proud to have one also. A thousand loving greetings to you and yours.

227W. S.

228ACS Columbia

To J. Stanley Little, [April 23?, 1892?]

229Paris: Tuesday

230My dear Stanley, I did not call for the letters that have come for me, until today: hence my delay in writing to thank you for the L/W, & for the Personal Note in it. With remerciements! I am enjoying burning the candle at both ends, extremely! Reformation definitely begins in May; a lasting one. Ergo: there is still a lot of hay to be made, & only a week’s sunshine! Well,’t is a good world in the main. Today I go to the ‘Vermissage’ at the New Salon – a swell affair, but enjoyable from the number of French and other friends sure to be met there. After this I am going to spend every morning from 9 till 12:30 at the Hotel. St. Romain in the room I took there d’avance, in writing.

231Hoping you are well,

232yrs ever | W. S.

233ACS Princeton

To J. Stanley Little, May 19, 1892

23416 Winchester Rd | Swiss Cottage | W. | Thursday Night | 19 May 1892

235My dear Little,

236Thanks for your letter. We both look forward to visiting you on Saturday of next week.

  • 63 The reference is to Little’s defense of Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles against an articl (...)

237I have read your Hardy Counterblast63 with extreme interest. There is one passage in it in particular which says ably and succinctly what many men and women are thinking – I mean the close of the penultimate paragraph on Slip 2: the passage beginning “Broadly considered, physical beauty denotes etc”.

238I have copied this for future use. It is admirably put.

239I have sent the slips on to a man to whom I have already spoken warmly of you and your work. I think some work, of an ordinarily remunerative kind will come to you through him. He or I will communicate with you probably next week. It is not much – but “many littles make a muckle”.

240Ever yours, | In haste, | William Sharp

241ALS Princeton

To Henry Hyde Champion,64 May 19, 1892

  • 64 Henry Hyde Champion (1859–1928), a socialist and one of the founders of the Independent Labor Part (...)

242May 19, 1892 | Monday Evening

243My dear Champion

244I send you Proof-Slips of a reply-article by my friend Stanley Little, the critic etc, of whom I spoke to you in connection with the Novel Review. They will give you a good idea of his style – and as he is a fearless and able writer & excellent critic I think he is just the man to prove a serviceable ally.

245À vous toujours | William Sharp

246ALS Private

To Arthur Stedman, May 21, 189265

  • 65 Date from postmark.

24721/

248Just time (for today’s mail) to send a hurried P/C of acknowledgment of your long & friendly letter, of the unbound copy of my poems & of receipt of the copies of “Flower o’ The Vine” – got today at 72 Inverness Terrace. They are charmingly got-up, and in every way I am pleased.

249Hope to write by next mail: must post this at once, or I’ll miss the mail.

250W. S.

251ACS Columbia

To J. Stanley Little, May 25, 189266

  • 66 Date from postmark.

252My dear Little

253Just time for a hurried line – Yes – the palates of both of us cry “All Hail” – at the idea of Guinea Fowl. Be assured we will be well content with everything.

254It will be impracticable for us to get away on Saty before the 3:55 train from Victoria – arriving at Rudgwick at 5:30.

  • 67 George Léon Little.

255I had a pleasant glimpse of your brother67 and his wife last Saty.

256À vous toujours | W. S.

257ACS Princeton

To J. M. Stoddart,68 May 25, 1892

  • 68 This single folded letter card is addressed to J. M. Stoddart Esq. | Editor | Lippincott’s Magazin (...)

25825/May/92 | London

259Dear Mr. Stoddart

260On returning from Paris I find your letter among others awaiting me. Sorry “The Second Shadow” did not suit you.

261I thought I had already written to you about Mrs. Blanche W. Howard. I gave her your message. At the moment, we are not in a position to collaborate, but it is quite possible she may have something of her own ready for you. If so, no doubt she has by this time communicated with you.

262Do you think you would care for a romance by myself for the magazine? It would be called “Monsieur Yank”, and is a story of love and exciting episodes in and around Paris during the Franco-German war and the Commune. The hero is a young American, who becomes known as Monsieur Yank. I am working occasionally at it – but will now wait till I hear from you.

263Please tell Miss Lillian North my long silence about the MS with which she entrusted me does not imply forgetfulness on my part. I shall write to her erelong.

264Best regards to you and yours

265Yours cordially | William Sharp

266ALCS Private

To J. Stanley Little, June 4, 1892

267Saty. June 4.92

268My dear Little,

269You will have received the telegram I so regretfully dispatched this morning. It is a great disappointment to us both.

270But last night Elizabeth had a relapse, and I had to go out at an early hour to fetch the doctor. He found her rallying again (it seems to be a kind of malarial fever – a recrudescence of what she had abroad once) – but now absolutely forbids her moving: as the risk would be too great. Besides, she is too weak.

  • 69 Elizabeth’s illness forced Sharp to cancel a meeting with Henry Hyde Champion, editor of Nineteent (...)

271He hopes she may be able to get away by Wednesday: possibly by Tuesday. I want her to go to the sea: but she clings to the idea of Rudgwick. Then she “doesn’t want to be bothered with strangers”, and looks upon you as a friend: indeed, I can assure you, she has conceived a very warm feeling for you in every way, as friend and comrade and writer – a feeling, my dear fellow, you will allow me to say, I share to the full. Will you be at home during the coming week? (By the way, I must put off Champion,69 having written to him to propose next Thursday). If not: are the rooms comfortable at the Martlett (?): and, in particular, is there any garden where E. could sit in the sun?

  • 70 See note to March 9, 1892 letter to Little. E. A. S. said: “During a visit to the art critic, J. S (...)

272If she can’t get away till Wedny, it is possible I may run down on Monday to see [?] about the wall-papers: but I cannot be sure till I see how E. gets on.70

273We are treating you at your word, you see: but I won’t apologise, for I know how wholehearted your kindness is.

274In gt. Haste | Affectionately Yours | William Sharp

275Thanks for the “Wealden School” paper. I’ll do what I can.

276ALS University of British Columbia

To Laura Hyde Stedman, [June 7?, 1892]

277Bucks Green | Rudgwick | Sussex

278Dear Mrs. Stedman,

  • 71 E. C. Stedman’s “The Nature and Elements of Poetry” appeared first in eight installments in The Ce (...)

279I shd. have written before this to ask about Mr. Stedman since his Jamaica trip (tell him his Poetry Articles71 are being much appreciated here) but all correspondence has been impossible lately, owing to my wife’s sudden and severe illness – a recrudescence, in part, of malarial fever caught at Genoa. She is now, I am glad to say, out of danger.

280At the end of June we “settle” at the above place – lovely country and healthy if somewhat remote. It will be our pied-à-terre at any rate.

281Ever yours, | William Sharp

282ACS Columbia

To Bliss Carman, June 11, 1892

  • 72 Later named Phenice Croft.

283Letter-address after this | The Laurels72 | Bucks Green | Rudgwick | Sussex

284My dear old Man,

285I hope the change from the Independent is in every way to your advantage.

286I wish you could get some good post over here!

287And now do publish a selection of your best work in verse: it is a mistake to postpone too long.

288I wish very much you would do me a favour and send me by return a copy of the new magazine “The Knight Errant”.

  • 73 This idea morphed into Sharp’s Pagan Review which had no contributors but Sharp himself.

289Entre nous: It is possible I may shortly myself bring out a magazine of a strikingly “modern” kind – one such as we do not have in England in any form.73 If so, no contributor’s name will be more welcome than that of my dear friend and true poet, Bliss Carman.

290Ever yours | William Sharp

291ALS Smith College Library

To Arthur Stedman, [?June 11], 1892

292New address | The Laurels | Bucks Green | Rudgwick – Sussex

293All correspondence has been impossible lately owing to my wife’s sudden and severe illness – a kind of recrudescence of a malarial fever. She is now out of danger I hope. We hope to “move into” the above address at the end of June – a pleasant and healthy if somewhat remote country.

294Hope you and yours are well

295W. S.

296ACS Columbia

To J. Stanley Little, June 20, 1892

29716 Winchester Road | Swiss Cottage | N. W. | 20 June 1892

298My dear Little

  • 74 Heinrich Heine, Italian Travel Sketches. etc. Part I, trans. E. A. Sharp (1892).

299On arrival here we found 2 copies of “Heine”, which seems to have been pubd. on Saty.74

300E. sends on one at once to you. She will write her name etc. in it the first time she is at Rudgwick.

  • 75 Francis Turner Palgrave (1824–1897), the eldest son of Sir Francis Palgrave, the antiquarian, was (...)

301By the way, I find that F. J. Palgrave’s75 address is 15 Chester Terrace, Regents’ Park, N. W. An early caller is at the door – I must be off –

302Yours ever, | W. S.

303ALS Princeton

To. J. Stanley Little, June 21, 1892

30421 June 1892

305My dear Little

  • 76 Sharp sent Henry Hyde Champion a sample of Stanley Little’s writing on May 19.

306I did not see Champion76 after all. He seems to have left town – but where or for how long I do not know.

307So I think it will be better to postpone your visit to us on Friday night, till the following week (or whenever a meeting can be arranged) – all the more for the reason that I must set-to on Friday and write perhaps all day and night and the greater part of Saturday at an important article which must be finished by the week-end. I apologise for thus putting you off, so far as my share in the act is concerned, for I know you will make all allowances.

308When are you to be in town in any case, on Friday or Saty?

309Affectionately Yours, camerado mio, | W. S.

310ALS Princeton

To J. Stanley Little, June 21, 1892

311Tuesday Night | 21/VI. 92

312My dear Fellow,

313I snatch a moment before the midnight post to answer yours to hand a little ago.

  • 77 Sharp’s sister Mary, who did copying work for him from time to time and, crucially, would provide (...)

314Yes: Mary77 has, I think, charged too little for the copying. It is my fault mainly. I told her in this instance to charge at the same rate as she does for me or any particular friend – forgetting that the last thing she did for me was a long affair, done at leisurely intervals and at a nominal rate. So she conscientiously abided by “the letter of the law”. I think if you send her 7/6 – or even in this instance the 10/ – you suggest, as she had to get a new type-ribbon on purpose – she will be well satisfied. You might say you had consulted me, and that in future (i.e. if you are willing to send more copying to her to do) you wish to pay for it at the same rate: i.e. about half the price charged by professional typists. She will be very glad to copy for you at that rate (as this is the only way she can get any irresponsible pocket-money, owing to my mother’s limited means now) – and she is generally both expeditious and expert. But of course, don’t in any way feel bound to send to her unless entirely convenient in every way. If you do feel so inclined, you can always send without enquiring as to whether she can do it or not: unless you want it in a great hurry, in which case it might be advisable to ask if she is free. (Any time except from July 25th to August 20th – 3 weeks in which she will be at the West Coast.)

  • 78 J. Stanley Little, The Wealden Painters at the Summer Exhibitions, 1892, reprinted from the West S (...)

315Thanks, old chap, for “The Wealden Painters”.78 I’ll try a para. about it in one or two quarters.

  • 79 A story or article Little had written, which Sharp suggests he try to publish as a pamphlet or boo (...)

316Do take care of yourself – and not overwork. (By the way, have you the ‘rights’ of “Barracks and Bohemia”:79 if so, why not try a shilling paper-copy edn. of it – say with Scott or some other firm, at a royalty?)

317Elizabeth has gone to bed, very tired, but not unwell, though she wishes she was back at Littlehampton or under your hospitable and friendly care – both, alas, out of the question meanwhile: or else she would join in love to you.

318Hurriedly Yours, | W. S.

319ALS Princeton

To J. Stanley Little, June 22, 1892

320Wednesday, 22 June 92

321My dear Little

322Many thanks for your long letter about the house – which we now think of calling “Kingscroft”, as that name has a raison d’être from what you say about old Farmer King.

323I have written to my sister Mary, about the other matter, and told her that you wd. not agree to such a nominal honorarium.

324I enclose Postal Notes for 18s/-, which please hand over to Napper (being the stipulated amount, 2/6 per day with 6d for beer, for five days): and it wd. much oblige me if at the same time you would inform him that we want nothing more done to the garden at present. I shall see to the further doing-up of it when I come to Rudgwick. When handing him the money, please say that Mr. Sharp says he has nothing to do with any extra labour unauthorised by him, and that this engaging extra assistance without consulting him first, is a thing he will not tolerate again. But if the scything has really been done, and Napper [has] done his work well, I am willing to let the 3s/ – I already advanced on a/c go as drink-money for his assistants.

325This is perhaps a worry for you, old chap? If so, don’t do it, and I’ll write direct: I am sure you have enough on your hands as it is. Your P.S. about the letters and book-packets you did up makes me shudder. Honestly, my dear fellow, you must ‘draw in’, or you will waste all your energies. At least, wait till you have a sposa amorosa to help you!

326Elizabeth says she would like (if nothing has yet been done) if the paint of the stairway, landing, and doors belonging thereto be done in a dark red (Pompeian red) – of one colour only, instead of the two shades already approved to match the paper. The doors in the Hotel at Littlehampton are responsible for this change of view.

327Again, if the drawing room has not been gone on with, we would now like if the painting of the skirting, doors, and mantel piece be uniformly of the pale tint of yellow, instead of the pale and yellow, as first arranged – but the inside of the doorless cupboard to be entirely of the deeper shade of yellow.

328The sanitary surveyor is to be at the house on Thursday afternoon I understand.

329We don’t want earth-closets, owing to the worry and expense of the frequent cleaning. We’ll use only one water-closet: but I’ll wait till I hear from Mr. Brooks and Mr. Jay before deciding further.

330I think now I’ll enter with furniture about the 13th or 14th of July – just when E. goes away for a fortnight to Germany.

  • 80 The Wealdon Painters at the Summer Exhibitions (1892).

331I have read your “Wealden Painters”80 again with great interest. It seems to me a pamphlet like that ought to bring you work, if some copies were properly placed. I’ll give you some special introductions for America, to try and get an “art-letter” to do.

332In gt. haste – | Affectly Yours | William Sharp

333ALS Princeton

To J. Stanley Little, June 24, 1892

33424| June 92

335My Dear Little

336A thousand thanks for all your trouble.

  • 81 Jay _______?, of Phenice Farm near Great Bookham, several miles north of Horsham, must have owned (...)

337We have now fixed upon a charming name for the house – if Jay be agreeable – namely “Phenice Croft”: which adjusts itself, too, to his own place at Great Bookham – Phenice Farm.81

  • 82 Theodor Watts (later Watts-Dunton) was a well-known critic and a friend of Sharp’s, and Water Cran (...)

338I return the Shelly Signature-List, with minimal suggestions as to the order in which I, if I were in your place, would line them. Also, Draft of the Prospectus, with one or two minor suggestions–scarcely, perhaps, worth suggesting. Both there & in the list – as invariably, either in print or MS. – I wish my name given in full, & not as “W. Sharp” or “Mr. Sharp”: as “William” is so recognizably part of my literary name that mention of it is much the same as to write to or of Theodore Watts as “T. Watts”, or Walter Crane as “W. Crane”,82 or Stanley Little as “S. Little”.

  • 83 Do you understand, my friend?

339Comprenez-vous, cher confrére?83

340You understand of course, old Chap, that my slight emendations are mere suggestions: and that I am in no way interfering with you or Mr. Robinson, The prospectus is excellent – & my hurried & minor suggestions, hurriedly noted down, are merely to the end to give no handle to the ever ready ‘corking reviewer’. Very likely, I am hypercritical.

  • 84 You may break, but shall not bend [me].

341My dear boy, we are both very sorry about the play, and the matter of the return: and fully sympathetic with you in the chagrin caused you. You have made so long and brave a fight, that the only thing to offer is Rossetti’s favorite and family mote “Frangas non Flectas”84 – for you, we are sure, are one who may be broken but will never be bent. The tide must turn: so say and believe Your affectionate friends

342William Sharp and Elizabeth A. Sharp

343ALS Princeton

To J. Stanley Little, June 30, 189285

  • 85 The following letter from Elizabeth A. Sharp to Stanley Little – one of several in the Princeton l (...)

344Thursday

345My dear Stanley Little

  • 86 Heinrich Heine, Italian Travel Sketches, etc. Part I, trans. E. A. Sharp (1892).

346I really do not know how to thank you for the splendid review you have written of my Heine.86 It will be of the greatest service to me, for you have said the best thing possible for me where you say “we are deluded with the belief that we have the work of a perfect master of the English language expressing himself quite naturally in his native tongue” – Also the sentence “She has absorbed Heine & given him back etc”.

347It is [a] generous appreciation indeed! And gives me confidence to go on with this sort of work, wherein the essential necessity is to reproduce the essential qualities of the writer under translation in a foreign tongue. To be literal in the sense rather than merely in the words, for often the nominal equivalent in English of a word in another language is not the real equivalent.

348I have no additions to suggest – your review is so good, far better than I expected to receive. Thank you so much; for I know you would not say what you do not think, and therefore your praise is precious.

  • 87 At this point two pages of the manuscript letter are missing.

349I did not answer sooner about other translations because I have been trying to find out particulars. Leland is revising his whole translation of prose and poetry and is bringing it out volume by volume in England now! I have so far forestalled him with the Letters on the French Stage. There is one vol: of miscellaneous prose in the Canterbury Series; and there are one or two odd volumes of prose – one by Snodgrass called, I think, “The Humour & Pathos”. But, excepting Leland’s American edition I believe that the present contents of my book have no…87

350It vexes me to think you have had so much work on my account but I appreciate it hugely.

351Certainly I will go and see your brother’s picture. I am always glad of the opportunity of seeing his work, which I thoroughly admire.

352[Elizabeth A. Sharp]

353ALS Princeton

Notes

1 For information about Le Gallienne, see Sharp’s letter to him in late February 1887.

2 Hall Caine, a disciple and biographer of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, was a close friend of Sharp’s in the early 1880s. Shortly after Rossetti died in 1882, Caine, a native of the Isle of Man, moved to Liverpool to work as a reporter for the Liverpool Mercury. For more about Caine, see note to Sharp’s letter to Rossetti of March 1880.

3 The Book-Bills of Narcissus (Derby: Frank Murray, 1892.)

4 Le Gallienne’s English Poems (London: Elkin Mathews and John Lane, 1892).

5 Sharp’s Life and Letters of Joseph Severn (London: Sampson Lowe, Marston & Co: March, 1892).

6 Sharp visited Louise Chandler Moulton on January 26 or 27 while staying with the Scudders in Boston.

7 A Fellowe and His Wife (London: James R. Osgood, MacIlvain & Co., 1892, and Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin & Co., 1892).

8 Phillip Marston’s A Last Harvest: Lyrics and Sonnets from the Book of Love, ed. Louise Chandler Moulton (London: Mathews & Lane, 1892).

9 Sharp is describing his meeting with Walt Whitman on January 16. E. A. S. said this meeting took place on January 23 (Memoir 193–94), but the sequence of events described in these letters supports the earlier date.

10 Horace Elisha Scudder (1838–1902) gained prominence and power on the American literary landscape when he became editor of the Atlantic Monthly in 1890, a post he held until 1898. See note to Sharp's letter to Scudder dated November 15, 1890.

11 Henry Mills Alden (1836–1919), a descendent of John and Priscilla Alden who arrived with the Mayflower, was born in Vermont and graduated from Williams College, where his fellow students included James A. Garfield, John J. Ingalls, and his life-long friend Horace E. Scudder. After Williams, Alden spent three years at Andover Theological Seminary. Though he never entered the ministry, he often served as preacher at neighborhood parishes. Alden’s literary career began while he was in the seminary with the acceptance of two articles by the Atlantic Monthly. They were sent to the magazine, unbeknownst to him, by his friend Harriet Beecher Stowe. When Alden moved to New York in 1861 to teach at a young ladies’ school, he wrote some articles for The Times (New York) and the New York Evening Post. His connection with Harper and Brothers began in 1862when the publishing house commissioned him to write a guidebook for the Central Railroad of New Jersey. Alden soon became an assistant editor of Harper’s Weekly, and in 1869, he was made editor of Harper’s Magazine, a position he held for fifty years until his death in 1919. In addition to the monthly essays he wrote for Harper’s Magazine, Alden published three books: God in His World (1890), A Study of Death (1895), and Magazine Writing and New Literature (1908). He also edited several volumes of American literature and short stories with William Dean Howells. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Alden received the honorary degrees of Doctor of Literature and Doctor of Laws in 1890 and 1907, respectively, from his alma mater, Williams College.

12 Letter dated by postmark.

13 Arthur Stedman, E. C. Stedman’s son, served as Sharp’s agent in dealing with C. L. Webster & Co., which published Sharp’s Flower o’ the Vine later in 1892.
The following itinerary of Sharp’s second visit to America can be constructed from the internal evidence of his letter:
Wed. 1/13: Arrived in New York, stayed with the Stedmans at 137 West 78th.
Fri. 1/15: Went to Philadelphia and met with Horace Traubel and J. M. Stoddart, editor of Lippincott’ s Magazine
Sat. 1/16: Visited Walt Whitman in Camden, New Jersey.
Sun. 1/17: Returned to New York.
Mon. 1/18 Wrote to E. A. S. regarding his visit to Whitman.
Thurs. 1/21: Wrote to Horace Scudder accepting invitation to stay at his home in Boston.
Fri. 1/22: Wrote to Arthur Stedman regarding Flower o’ the Vine.
Fri. 1/22: Wrote p/c to Louis Chandler Moulton: he would see her the following Tuesday or Wednesday in Boston.
Fri. 1/22: Accompanied H. M. Alden to Metuchen, N. J., and spent the weekend with him.
Mon. 1/25: Traveled to Boston and stayed with the Scudders in Cambridge.
Tues. 1/26: Wrote to A. Stedman discussing plans to return to New York.
Wed. 1/27: Wrote to Laura Stedman discussing plans in N. Y.
Thurs. 1/28: Left Boston for New York and spent the night at A. Stedman’ s.
Fri. 1/29: Returned to the E. C. Stedmans’ and stayed until Tuesday.
Fri. 1/29: Letter to Horace Scudder re: proposed articles.
Sat. 1/30: Dined with Irene Jones Harland, Henry Harland’ s mother.
Sun 1/31: Spent the day with E. C. Stedman who had been in Philadelphia
Tues. 2/2/92: Farewell to the Stedmans and spent the night in a midtown hotel.
Wed. 2/3/92: Departed New York on the Majestic; thank you letter to Laura Stedman mailed from the pilot boat.

14 F. J. Hall was an editor at C. L. Webster & Co. and responsible for the negotiations with Arthur Stedman and Sharp regarding the firm’s publication of Sharp’s Flower o’ the Vine: Romantic Ballads and Sospiri di Roma, introduction by Thomas A. Janvier (New York: 1892.)

15 Thomas A. Janvier.

16 Stedman had asked Sharp to be his guest at a dinner meeting of the Author’s Club on Thursday, January 28.

17 Leaves of Grass: Including Sands at Seventy, 1st Annex, Goodbye My Fancy, 2nd Annex: A Backward Glance o’er Traveled Roads (Philadelphia: The David McKay Company, 1891–92).

18 David McKay (1860–1918,) a Scotsman, established a publishing firm in Philadelphia in 1882: The David McKay Company. The first book published by the firm was the ninth edition of Whitman’s Leaves of Grass (1882).

19 Irene Jones Harland was the widow of a very successful New York lawyer and the mother of Henry Harland (1861–1905) who was well known in New York as the author of a series of sensational novels published under the pseudonym Sidney Luska. In 1887 Henry and his wife, Aline Merriam Harland, left New York for Paris and soon settled in London where he began to refine his prose style in a series of stories. His first widely read and widely acclaimed novel, The Cardinal’s Snuff-box, was published in 1890. Harland is best known today for his advocacy of fin de siècle aestheticism. With Aubrey Beardsley, he founded in 1894 The Yellow Book which became the principal vehicle of the movement. He served as that periodical’s literary editor and contributed many stories. He was plagued by physical and nervous disorders, and he died very young, following a protracted illness, in 1905 in Saint Remo.

20 Sharp returned to New York from his three-day stay in Cambridge with the Scudders on January 28, 1892 (a Thursday). This is the surviving section of a personal letter Sharp wrote to thank Scudder for his hospitality and to report he had seen Henry Mills Alden’s wife who was very ill and in either a hospital or a nursing home in New York City. She would soon die, leaving Alden a widower. Scudder and Alden were college classmates and firm friends.

21 Sharp had planned to stay a week in Boston and prolong his stay in America, but while staying with the Scudders he received news that his brother Edward had died. He returned to New York on Thursday, January 28 and sailed for England on Wednesday, February 3 on the Majestic.

22 This is a business letter Sharp wrote to Scudder to ask if he would like to consider two articles on contemporary Belgium and French writers. He decided not to approach Houghton Mifflin directly about publishing a book consisting of these articles expanded and translations of some of the writers. He suggests that Scudder might broach that subject with the editors of the firm using this letter as a basis. A principal purpose of Sharp’s trip to the United States was to gain more access for his writings among U. S. publishers and editors and thus to increase his visibility and income.

23 An article by Sharp entitled “La Jeune Belgique” was published in Nineteenth Century, 34 (Sept. 1893), 416–36.

24 There follows a list of sixty-five Belgian and French writers.

25 Sharp was at the publisher’s office and wrote to Stedman on the firm’s letterhead.

26 Possibly Daniel McIntyre Henderson, a Scottish poet and bookseller who emigrated to the U. S. A. in 1873 and became a bookkeeper with R. Renwick & Sons, furniture makers. He had written poetry before his emigration, and he published two volumes of poetry in the United States: Poems: Scottish and American (1888) and A Bit Bookie of Verse (1906). He was best known for his ode to celebrate the hundred and fiftieth anniversary of Baltimore in 1880 and for a poem that honored his fellow Scottish emigrant: “Epistle to Andrew Carnegie.” He would have known both Stoddart of Lippincott’s Magazine and the Stedmans. If he had an office in Philadelphia, Arthur Stedman may have sent him, for transmission to Sharp, his letter introducing Sharp to Whitman.

27 Horace Traubel (1858–1919), editor, biographer, and poet, is best known for his friendship with Walt Whitman, who lived with Traubel’s brother in Camden, New Jersey, across the river from Philadelphia. A native of Camden, Traubel visited the poet almost daily from the mid-1880s until Whitman died in March 1892. At the time of Sharp’s visit in January 1892, Traubel worked as a clerk in a Philadelphia bank while also serving as Whitman’s primary gatekeeper. He probably accompanied Sharp to Camden and was “the fair companion” who returned with Sharp to Philadelphia. After Whitman’s death, Traubel began producing from his notes what would become a nine-volume biography of Whitman’s final four years, With Walt Whitman in Camden (1964). Three volumes of this massive work were published before Traubel died, and the others appeared posthumously. One of Whitman’s three literary executors, Traubel also edited The Complete Writings of Walt Whitman (10 vols., 1902).

28 Joseph Marshall Stoddart (1845–1921) was the editor of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine and a friend of Whitman’s. Sharp discussed with him various stories and articles he might write for that important periodical.

29 Possibly Francis James Child (1825–1896), who became the first Professor of English Literature at Harvard in 1876. He edited Four Old Plays (1848), The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser (1855), English and Scottish Ballads (1857–1858), and Poems of Sorrow and Comfort (1865). His five-volume collection of English and Scottish Popular Ballads (1883–1898) was a monumental achievement and remains the standard collection of English and Scottish folk music.

30 F. J. Hall. See note to January 22, 1892 letter to Arthur Stedman.

31 J. W. Young, a student or faculty member at Harvard, wrote a letter to Stedman asking if he would invite Sharp to lecture at Harvard on a subject of contemporary literature: “Quite a number of Harvard men are anxious to see and hear Mr. Sharp if he will consent to come to Cambridge.” Laura Stedman must have sent Young’s letter to Sharp since E. A. S. quoted from it in the Memoir (194–95).

32 Flower o' the Vine (1892).

33 Although Sharp considered publishing the short dramatic works under a pseudonym, the volume finally appeared under his own name in 1894 as Vistas. Sharp’s interest at this time in pseudonyms was manifest, however, when, later in 1892, he edited The Pagan Review under a pseudonym and wrote all its contents under various pseudonyms.

34 (Henry) Austin Dobson (1840–1921), poet, essayist, and biographer, entered government service with the Board of Trade, where he remained until his retirement in 1901. His non-poetical works include biographies of Hogarth (1879), Fielding (1883), Richard Steele (1886), Oliver Goldsmith (1888), Horace Walpole (1890), Samuel Richardson (1902), and Fanny Burney (1903). His poetry was collected in the Complete Poetical Works (1923).

35 A portion of the manuscript is unreadable here. When the book appeared it was dedicated “To Edmund Clarence Stedman with Homage and Love.”

36 Regarding the death of Sharp’s brother.

37 Edgar Fawcett(1847–1904) was a successful novelist Sharp met in New York. His best known novels – Purple and Fine Linen (1873) and New York (1898) – were satirical studies of New York high society. He also wrote Solarion (about a dog given human intelligence) and Douglas Duane (on scientific body-switching), as well as The Ghost of Guy Thryle (which features astral projection as a means of interplanetary travel).

38 James Clarence Harvey (1859–1917) was a poet.

39 A Fellowe and His Wife (1892).

40 There is no evidence of such a commission.

41 “Primavera di Capri,” Good Words, 33 (1892), 396–411.

42 Janvier’s The Uncle of an Angel, and Other Stories (1891).

43 “Editor’s Study,” Harper’s, 84 (Feb. 1892), 478–79.

44 Henry and Aline Merriam Harland; Irene Jones Harland. See note to Sharp’s letter to Laura Stedman of January 27, 1892.

45 Austin Dobson, Eighteenth Century Vignettes, 3 vols. (1892–1896).

46 John Charles Van Dyke (1856–1932) was a prolific writer on art and art history.

47 Principles of Art: Part I: Art in History; Part II: Art in Theory (1887).

48 James Stanley Little, who was educated at King’s College Cambridge, lived for a time with his brother George, an artist, in Buck’s Green, Rudgwick, Sussex. He became a good friend of William and Elizabeth Sharp after he found them a house to let in Buck’s Green. He was the First Executive Secretary of the Society of Authors (1888–90) and Honorable Secretary of the Shelley Society (1886–87). He was the principal organizer of a Shelley Centenary Celebration at Horsham in 1892. He was actively involved in the movement to reform the Royal Academy. Among his many publications: What is Art (1884), The United States of Britain (1887), A Vision of Empire (1889), The Wealdon Painters (1892), A Wealdon Tragedy (1894) and The Life and Work of W. Q. Orchardson, RA (1897).

49 Possibly The Library Review, published from 1892–1893.

50 George Léon Little (1862–1941).

51 I have been unable to identify her.

52 Walt Whitman died on March 26, 1892.

53 “Walt Whitman,” The Athenaeum, 96 (April 2, 1892), 436–37. Watt’s lengthy article on Whitman damned him for lack of intelligence and criticized his poetry, especially Leaves of Grass, for its lack of meter, its unintelligibility, and its amazing indecency “that has done no harm. It is merely the attempt of a journalist to play ‘the noble savage’ by fouling with excrement the doorstep of Civilization.” One can see why Sharp, an admirer of Whitman, would strongly object to Watts’ diatribe and share his views with Stedman who, along with many American critics, venerated Whitman and mourned his passing.

54 Henry Harland.

55 Alfred Austin (1835–1913), a political journalist who succeeded Tennyson as poet laureate in 1895, founded and edited, with William J. Courthope, The National Review. His works include Randolph (1854), The Human Tragedy (1862,) The Tower of Babel (1874), Prince Lucifer (1887), Lyrical Poems (1891), Narrative Poems (1891), and The Garden That I Love (1894).

56 The rest of the manuscript is missing.

57 Probably The Literary World of April 9, 1892 in which Sharp’s and Blanche Willis Howard’s A Fellowe and His Wife was reviewed.

58 Sharp mentions later (see letter 151) a “Summer Shows” article written by Little for the West Sussex Gazette and reprinted as The Wealden Painters at the Summer Exhibitions, 1892 (Arundel: West Sussex Gazette Office, 1892).

59 Introduction to Flower o’ the Vine (1892).

60 Jean Moréas (1856–1910) was the name taken by Iannis Pappadiamantopoulos, a Greek poet who adopted French culture and tastes. He began as a Symbolist and gradually moved toward poetry that was classical in theme, form, and style. Maurice Barrès (1862–1923) was a novelist, essayist and politician who studied law at Nancy and became active politically after 1889. Henri Cazalis (1840–1909) was a minor poet, doctor, and friend of Mallarmé who took the name Jean Lahor. He was interested in the occult. Jules Renard (1864–1910), a novelist, joined the original staff of Mercure de France, chief among the symbolist reviews. I have been unable to identify Eugène Holland or Leon Vaniers.

61 Catherine Janvier.

62 Stedman wrote a poem about Walt Whitman following his death that was published in the United States and England. He has sent Sharp a manuscript copy of the poem which Sharp says he will place in the edition of Whitman’s poems Stedman gave him during his recent trip to America.

63 The reference is to Little’s defense of Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles against an article in the Quarterly Review that criticized the novel as unrealistic and contrary to the obligations of marriage. Little had given Sharp proof slips for an opinion piece by Little that would appear in the August issue of The Artist and Journal of Home Culture, a publication which promoted the arts. The complete sentence Sharp found praiseworthy: “Broadly considered physical beauty denotes intellectual beauty and right-living, though it is often only the legacy – the unearned increment – of these things; and the desire to possess this beauty, perverted as that desire often is, is per se a healthy instinct making for beauty and righteousness in the race.” Whether or not many men and women shared Little’s opinion, Sharp believed the desire to possess physical beauty, though often perverted, more often generates intellectual beauty and righteousness.

64 Henry Hyde Champion (1859–1928), a socialist and one of the founders of the Independent Labor Party, was acting editor of the journal Nineteenth Century in 1892. Sharp was sending proof-slips of Little’s “Hardy Counterblast” in the hope that Champion would recognize Little as ally in the liberal cause and ask him to contribute to the journal. A month later, on June 21, Sharp had to tell Little he had not been able to see Champion.

65 Date from postmark.

66 Date from postmark.

67 George Léon Little.

68 This single folded letter card is addressed to J. M. Stoddart Esq. | Editor | Lippincott’s Magazine | Messrs. Lippincott& Co. | Philadelphia. A received post mark in Philadelphia is dated June 2.

69 Elizabeth’s illness forced Sharp to cancel a meeting with Henry Hyde Champion, editor of Nineteenth Century, where he would have praised Little as a potential contributor.

70 See note to March 9, 1892 letter to Little. E. A. S. said: “During a visit to the art critic, J. Stanley Little, at Rudgwick, Sussex, my husband saw a little cottage which attracted him and we decided to take it as a pied-a-terre.” The Sharps were staying with Mona Caird at Northbrook, Micheldever during the first week of June while negotiations were taking place for the house in Sussex. On June 7 Sharp wrote in his diary: “Went down to Rudgwick, Sussex by appointment, and agreed to take the cottage on a 3-years’lease” (Memoir 199–200).

71 E. C. Stedman’s “The Nature and Elements of Poetry” appeared first in eight installments in The Century Magazine, 43–44 (March-Oct., 1892), 752–761, 821–829, 143–152, 180–189, 365–374, 613–622, 661–669, and 859–869. The essays were then published as a book in the fall of 1892.

72 Later named Phenice Croft.

73 This idea morphed into Sharp’s Pagan Review which had no contributors but Sharp himself.

74 Heinrich Heine, Italian Travel Sketches. etc. Part I, trans. E. A. Sharp (1892).

75 Francis Turner Palgrave (1824–1897), the eldest son of Sir Francis Palgrave, the antiquarian, was the art critic for the Saturday Review, a regular contributor to the Quarterly Review, and Professor of Poetry at Oxford from 1885–1895. His works include: Idylls and Songs (1854), Hymns (1867), Lyrical Poems (1871), The Visions of England (1881), and the anthologies, Golden Treasury of English Verse (1861), The Children’s Treasury of English Song (1875), and The Treasury of Sacred Song (1889).

76 Sharp sent Henry Hyde Champion a sample of Stanley Little’s writing on May 19.

77 Sharp’s sister Mary, who did copying work for him from time to time and, crucially, would provide the handwriting for the letters Sharp would write as from Fiona Macleod.

78 J. Stanley Little, The Wealden Painters at the Summer Exhibitions, 1892, reprinted from the West Sussex Gazette (1892).

79 A story or article Little had written, which Sharp suggests he try to publish as a pamphlet or book.

80 The Wealdon Painters at the Summer Exhibitions (1892).

81 Jay _______?, of Phenice Farm near Great Bookham, several miles north of Horsham, must have owned the house in Buck’s Green the Sharps were letting and wished to name Phenice Croft.

82 Theodor Watts (later Watts-Dunton) was a well-known critic and a friend of Sharp’s, and Water Crane (1845–1915) was an illustrator of children’s books and a close friend of Little’s.

83 Do you understand, my friend?

84 You may break, but shall not bend [me].

85 The following letter from Elizabeth A. Sharp to Stanley Little – one of several in the Princeton library – is included to demonstrate the close relationship they were developing.

86 Heinrich Heine, Italian Travel Sketches, etc. Part I, trans. E. A. Sharp (1892).

87 At this point two pages of the manuscript letter are missing.

Table des illustrations

Légende Fig. 10. Walt Whitman, aged 37, from the frontispiece to Leaves of Grass (Fulton St., Brooklyn, N. Y, 1855). Steel engraving by Samuel Hollyer from a lost daguerreotype by Gabriel Harrison (1854), Wikimedia, https://commons.wikimedia.org/​wiki/​File:Walt_Whitman,_steel_engraving,_July_1854.jpg, Public Domain.
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/7847/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 143k
Légende Fig. 11a. Early 20th century photograph of Bucks Green, Rudgwick, Sussex. © Rudgwick Preservation Society. Courtesy of Roger Nash, Chair, Rudgwick Preservation Society, https://www.rudgwick-rps.org.uk
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/7847/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 200k
Légende Fig. 11b. Mid-20th Century photograoph of Bucks Green, Rudgwick, Sussex. Phenice Croft, now the Toll House, is across the road from the building, now white, which housed the shop. ©The Francis Frith Collection, https://www.francisfrith.com/​bucks-green/​bucks-green-the-village-c1965_b587001
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/7847/img-3.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 179k

Acheter

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search