Version classiqueVersion mobile
OpenEdition Books

That Greece Might Still Be Free

 | 
William St Clair

Index

Texte intégral

Aberdeen, 4th Earl of, 58

Académie Royale de Musique. See Rossini

Acrocorinth, 87, 94; fortress retaken by Turks, 104. See Corinth

Acropolis. See Athens

Act of Submission (Greek offer to put their country under British protection), 237, 288

Adams, John Quincy, U.S. Secretary of State: correspondence with Mavrocordato, 299-300; sends an agent to Constantinople to negotiate secretly a commercial treaty with Turkey, 300-1; simultaneous dealings with Greek Government to build warships in U.S., 301-2

Aegina, 197, 202, 326, 344; Howe (q.v.) builds a quay (the American Mole) there, 345-6. Pl . 29

Aimino, Vincenzo, Italian Philhellene, 258

Albanians, 2, 6, 7, 9, 10, 15, 43, 44, 49, 92, 94, 99, 101, 109, 173, 199, 225, 238, and passim; Albanian dress the national dress of Greece, 232

’Alepso, Prince’, impostor from Alsace, 72, 120, 375. Fig. 13

Alexander, Czar, 314-15

Alexandria, 2, 227; Cochrane’s abortive attack on Mehemet’s fleet at, 331

Alfieri, Vittorio, Count, Italian poet, 20, 75, 198

Ali Pasha, 6, 10, 28, 40, 94, 95, 98, 102, 108, 190

Alsace, 72

America. See United States

American War of Independence, 271

Amphissa, 102, 106

Ancient and Modern Greeks: alleged identity of, 15 - 17, 53, 350-2; find ’Modern Greece is not the same as Ancient Greece’, 116-17; the Acropolis as a symbol of identity, 317

Ancient names assumed by modern Greeks, 20

Ancona, 23, 153

Anglo-Russian Protocol on Greece, 315-16

Ann: sails from Gravesend with British Philhellenic expedition, 158

Aphrodite of Melos (Venus de Milo), 288

Appeal to the French People: Philhellenic pamphlet by ’an ex-student of law’, 56-7

Appeal to the Nations of Europe, from ’the Spartan headquarters’ at Calamata, 59

Apollo, Temple of, in Aegina, 197

’Apostles, The New’, 195-204

Arabs, 8; prepare to attack Greece, 226; invade the Peloponnese, 233; besiege Navarino, 234. See also Ibrahim; Mehemet Ali

Archaizing of names, 21

Argos, 72, 86, 87, 189; destruction of Turkish army in, 105-6

Aristogeiton, 24, 350

armatoli (Greeks licensed by the Turks to carry arms), 8, 12, 36, 232, 292

Armenians, 8, 92

Arnaud, French Philhellene, 282-3, 387

Arta, 96-7, 98, 99, 100, 1 01

Artemisia. See Boubolina

Artemis (St. Artemidos), 197

Aschaffenburg (assembly centre for German Philhellene volunteers), 63, 67

Aschling, Nils Fr.: Forsok till Grekiska Revolutionens Historia, 362, 371, 372, 378

Asia Minor, 5, 7, 24, 41, 49, 79, 87, 92, 104, 196, 201, and passim

Athens, 76; archaizing in schools, 20; false report of capture of town by Greeks, 24; abortive attempt by Greeks to capture the Acropolis, 86; besieged Turks surrender, 104, and are massacred by Greeks, 104; Consuls at, 112; Turks re-enter town, but Acropolis retained by Greeks, 292, 317; Turks undertake not to damage monuments, 317; failure of attempts to relieve besieged Greeks in Acropolis, 317-1 9, 323, 329; surrendered to Turks, 329. Fig. 27, 28

Athens Free Press, or Ephemerides of Athens, 187 Athos, Mount, 6

Atrocities, Greek and Turkish. See Massacres

Attica, 283, 292, 318, 325

Austerlitz, 57

Austria, 5, 6, 25, 30, 31, 52, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66, 315; Greek colonies in, 9. And see Metternich

Bacon, Francis, Lord, 59

Baden, 64, 65, 72

Bailly, Dr., agent of French Philhellenes, 323

Baleste, 41, 46, 87, 108, 287, 302; engaged by Demetrius Hypsilantes to raise the first regiment of a Greek national army, 26; suggests killing Colocotrones, 46; joins revolt in Crete and is killed there, 48, 287. Fig. 10. See Regiment, The (Regiment Baleste; later Regiment Tarella)

Bank of England and national economic crisis, 217

Baptism, forcible, 9, 39. And see Circumcision, forcible

Barbarians, Barbarism, arbarization, 15, 55, 76, 77, 78, 316

Barff, Samuel, British banker in Zante, 210, 211, 214, 215, 228. See Loans to Greek Government

Baring Brothers, 205-6

Barthélemy, L’Abbé Jean-Jacques: Travels of the Young Anacharsis in Greece (Voyage du jeune Anacharsis en Grèce), 368

Bartholdy, J. L. S.: Reise in Griechenland, 369

Basil, St., 201

Battalion of Philhellenes. See Philhellene Battalion

Bavaria, 63, 64-5, 71, 153, and passim; King Ludwig sends party of Philhellenes to Greece under Karl Heideck (q.v.), 322-3; they are unenthusiastically received, 323. And see Otho

Bayard, William, President of New York Greek Committee: arranges for supply of American-built warships to Greeks, 301-2; scandal of contracts, 310-12: his excessive fees, 311 and fn.

Beaufillot, Charles, French Philhellene: attempts to burn frigate under construction for Mehemet Ali in Marseilles, 276

Beck, Benjamin and Franz, German Philhellenes, 374, 377

Beethoven, Ludwig van, 61

Bekir Aga. See Mari

Bellier de Launay, Colonel Marquis Wilhelm, 159, 160, 175, 177; killed at Missolonghi, 242. Einige Worte über Griechenland, 362, 375

Bentham, Jeremy, 147 and fn., 148-9, 155, 159, 163, 178, 186, 188, 195; Springs of Action, 170; and Greek Loan, 210, 221; writes condescending letters of utilitarian advice to Mehemet Ali, 349. The Works of Jeremy Bentham (ed. John Bowring), 380 Berton, Colonel B., French Philhellene, 218- 19, fn., 248

Bible distribution, 198, 202-3; paper from, used for cartridges, 203

Blaquiere, Edward, British ex-naval officer turned propagandist and leading member of the London Greek Committee, 140-1, 142, 143, 144, 146, 147 fn.; 148, 153, and passim; 299, 307, 3 13, 3 21 ; calls on Byron in Genoa, 150; gives him misleading account of conditions in Greece, 152; bombards him with letters, 153; reaches Greece in the Florida with first instalment of English loan, 180, 210; his deceptive claims about financial prospects of Greek Government, 207-9; hi s Greek Revolution and other pro-Greek writings, 208, 219; his ’anti-semitic smears’, 208; his ’rushing around’ in Greece, 213; brings Greek boys to London, 213-14; bustles in Greece to reconcile rival leaders, 325-6; drowned in 1832 while on a mission to Portugal, 349. Report on the Present State of the Greek Confederation, 362, 383; The Greek Revolution, 208, 362, 383; Narrative of a Second Visit to Greece, 362, 379, 382, 384; Greece and her Claims, 362, 383

Boldemann, Wilhelm, German Philhellene, 372, 378

Bonaparte, Paul-Marie, French Philhellene, 248

Bonapartists, 29, 32, 76, 133, 234, 245, 247, 248, 257, 268, 279, 289, 321

Bonn, 69, 153

Borel: alias of Colonel Fabvier, q.v.

Boston, Massachusetts, 60, 177; Boston Poor House, 32

Botsaris, Marco, Albanian Suliote leader, 24, 36,108,179; ’the modern Leonidas’, 269

Boubolina, a woman of Hydra, dubbed ’the Modern Artemisia or the Greek Joan of Arc’, 24

Bourbaki, Colonel, French Philhellene, former officer in Imperial army, 247; killed in unsuccessful advance on Athens, 324 Bourbons, 57, 133, 245, 265, 279, 289, 320 Bowring (Sir) John, Secretary of London Greek Committee, 141-3, 146, 147 and fn., 148, 153, 169, 186, 206, 210, 211, 254, 255, 299, 308; his personal speculations in Greek loan bonds, 211-20 passim; promotion of his own interests, 212; his anonymous article in the Westminster Review a piece of ’unscrupulous polities’, 220; appointed secretary of investigating committee, 220; employed by British Government for commercial investigations, 222. ’The Greek Committee’ (Westminster Review), 365, 381. Fig. 15

Boyer, General, member of French Government mission to Mehemet Ali, 274, 276

Brazil, 217, 305

Brengeri, Italian Philhellene, 251-2, 371

British Government, 30; receives firsthand reports from Near East, 29; attitude to Greek revolution, 57-9, 263-72; intelligence service, 132-3, 264, 279; rejects Greek offer to put their country under, 237, 279 (see Act of Submission); anxious to maintain neutrality, 308; Cochrane (q.v.) eludes prosecution under Foreign Enlistment Act, 308-9

British Philhellenes, 66, 13 8-49; equipment of expedition to Greece, 156-8

British and Foreign Bible Society, Fifteenth Report of the, 383

Broglie, Duc de, member of the Paris Greek Committee, 270

Brown, Charles Armitage, 382

Brownbill, ’a hypocritical canting methodist’ (Parry, q.v.), 198

Browne, James Hamilton, 175, 178, 215-16; ’Voyage from Leghorn to Cephalonia’ and ’Narrative of a Visit in 1823 to the Seat of War in Greece’ (in Blackwood’s Magazine), 362, 380

Bulgarians, 7, 92

Bulwer, Henry Lytton (later Sir Henry), 215-16, 350; An Autumn in Greece, 362, 382, 383

Bunyan, John: The Pilgrim’s Progress, 202

Burdett, Sir Francis, M.P., member of the London Greek Committee, 146. Fig. 15

Burma River War, 307

Burton, London broker: identity revealed by The Times, after Louriottis’ masking him as ’a friend of Greece’, 220-1

Buskins, archaic footwear adopted by professors and students of the Hellenic University, Corfu, 21

Byern, Eugen von, Prussian Philhellene, excavalry officer, 287-8; Bilder aus Griechenland und der Levante, 354, 362, 371, 375, 376, 388

Byron, George Gordon Noel, Lord, 32, 136, 145, 157, 209, 210, 214-15, 385; first visit to Greece, 17; publishes cantos I-II of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage and becomes a European celebrity, 17-19; Don Juan, 18, 139, 151; translation of the war-song of Rhigas, 20-1; wide influence of his philhellenic poems, 53; Blaquiere (q.v.) calls on him in Genoa, 150; his literary philhellenism, 151; decides to go to Greece, 152-4; takes flamboyant wardrobe and black American groom, 154; his illusions discarded, 167; decoyed by London Greek Committee, 167; receives requests from Mavrocordato and Colocotrones, 168; presses on Bowring need to raise loan for Greek Government, 168; lingers in Cephalonia as guest of Napier, British Resident, 168-9; reaches Missolonghi and receives regal welcome, 169; his quarrels with Stanhope, 170; the Byron Brigade, 173-84; his military plan, 174; death of, 180, Fig. 14; becomes posthumously a cult figure of romantic revolutionaries, 183; failure of Byron Brigade after its ’poet paymaster’ dies, 228; French view of his influence on Greek situation, 263-4; his pilgrimage and death stimulate French Philhellenism, 267; flood of French poetry on his death, 267. Fig. frontispiece, 18

Byzantine past, Modern Greeks’ hankering after the, 20; aim to restore a Byzantine Christian Empire, 95

Cabillo Tores: alias of Fabvier, q.v.

Café du Parc (renamed Café d’Hypsilanti), Philhellene headquarters in Marseilles, 71 and fn.

Calamata, 13, 26, 28, 33, 40, 43, 44, 82, 186; affray at between French, German, and Italian volunteers, 44; ’Spartan Headquarters’ at, 59

Calosso, Italian Philhellene: joins Fabvier, quarrels with him, and leaves Greece, 261; after destitution in Constantinople his superb horsemanship earns him control of the military riding school, and later the training of Sultan Mahmoud and the new cavalry, following the extermination of the Janissaries (q.v.), 262; later career, 386

Cambrian, H.M.S., 198, 279

Campaign of 1822: its three great events – the destruction of Chios, the expedition to Epirus, and the Turkish invasion of the Peloponnese, 109; the Revolution survives the Ottoman Government’s first attempt to re-enforce its authority, 109; the decisive role of the Captains, 109-10

Canaris, Greek Admiral, son of, sent to France for education, 269

Canning, George, British Foreign Secretary, 133, 139-40, 142, 211, 314- 15, 316, 387

Capodistria, John, Count, 134-5, 160, 344, 346; plan to invite him to become President, 264; acceptable to rival leaders as well as to the European Powers, 325-6; proclaimed in absentia President of the Greek Republic for seven years, 327; Fabvier quarrels with him, 349; assassinated, 356

Captains: local leaders of bands of Greek irregulars, 3 6, 37, 40, 93, 325; hostile to volunteers from the West, 45; their view of the Greek Revolution, 95; their triumph over Turkish army, 109; ’hit and run’ methods, 109-10; became rich successful warlords, 110, 172; fail against Arabs, 249; ’deliberately discredited and destroyed The Regiment’, 318; described by Howe (q.v.) as ’brigand chiefs’, 341. And see Jarvis Caraiskakis: Greek captain of irregulars, 289-90

Carbonari (actual or suspected members of revolutionary secret societies), 3 1, 65, 252, 255, 279

Carey, Matthew, U.S. (Philadelphia) Philhellene, 338

Carlsbad decrees, 61, 62

Carystos (Turkish fortress), 283

’Cassim Bey’, 288

Casos, island, 227, 228, 230

Castellan, A. L.: Lettres sur la Morée, 369

Castlereagh, Viscount (later 2nd Marquis of Londonderry), British Foreign Secretary (1812-22), 44, 139

Castri, 325, 326

Cephalonia, 167, 169, 319

Chalcidice, 2

Chandler, Richard: Travels in Greece, 368

Chastelain, M., representative of Knights of Malta, 130

Chateaubriand, Vicomte François-René: Itinéraire de Paris à Jerusalem, 369; Note on Greece, 270 (Note sur la Grèce, 387)

Chauncey, Captain, U.S. naval officer, 302

Chesme, Turkish port in Asia Minor, 79

Chevalier, Swiss Philhellene and pretended Hanseatic officer; wounds Lasky (q.v.) in duel, 73-4; becomes company commander, 90; killed at Peta, 101

Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage. See Byron

Chile, 304-5, 306-7

Chios (Scio): under Turkish rule, but population (over 100,000) almost exclusively Greek, 78; idyllic life in, 78; wealthy and prosperous on mastic crop, 79; proclaims loyalty to Ottoman Government, 79; Greek revolutionaries invade the island and embroil the Sciotes with the Turks, 79-80; Turkish fleet lands troops to counter-attack and wholesale massacre ensues, 80-1, 227: refugees from, 88, 334. Fig. 12. See Delacroix

Choiseul, Duc de, 270, 289

Choiseul-Gouflfier, Comte de: Voyage Pittoresque de la Grèce, 368

Christian Moral Society, 266-7

Christians, extermination of, 5

Church, Sir Richard, 325; his distinguished military career, 319-20; receives repeated offers to command in Greece and at length accepts, 321; lands in Greece but declines to act until rival leaders unite, 326; directs operations from his yacht, 328; irregulars do not respond to his orders, 329; disastrous attempt to relieve the Acropolis, 329; his reputation steadily diminishes, 349. Fig. 33

Circumcision, forcible, 9, 39. And see Baptism, forcible

Civil Wars: rival chieftains, 227; Government action against Colocotrones, 228; effects of arrival of English gold, 228-33; Government hires Roumeliotes to crush Colocotrones’ rebellion, 231

Clape, Giraud de la: Appel aux Français en faveur des Grecs, 373

Clergyman’s Guide, The, 202

Cochrane, Admiral Thomas (10th Earl of Dundonald), 320, 325; his remarkable career, 303-10; his terms to Greeks, 305-6, 308; contravenes the Foreign Enlistment Act and moves to France to avoid prosecution, 308; frustrated by long delay in delivery of ships for Greece, 308-13; ’phantom fleet’, 310-13; writes ironically to Mehemet, 313, 331; reaches Greece but declines to act unless rival leaders unite, 326; failure of plan to relieve Greeks besieged in the Acropolis, 328-9; remains in Greek waters until 1828 but fails to achieve any spectacular success, 349; The Autobiography of a Seaman, 389

Codrington, Admiral Sir Edward: Commander-in-Chief of allied squadrons at battle of Navarino, 331-2

Colin, Alexandre Maria: ’Massacre of the Greeks’ (painting), 269

Collegno, Count Giacinto Provana di, Italian Philhellene, 254-5, 260; disillusioned in Greece, 256, 258; captured by Arabs, but released, 256-7. And see Ottolenghi

Colocotrones, Theodore, 77, 93, 165, 227; most formidable of Greek local warlords, 36-7; poses as a Robin Hood, but is mainly a bandit, 3 7; served with British Army in Ionian Islands, 37; rich enough to maintain largest band of armed Greeks (3,000) in the Peloponnese, 3 7; has biggest contingent at Tripolitsa, 43; his conduct there, 44-5; enriches himself, 45; Baleste (q.v.) suggests killing him, 46; his part in abortive Nauplia attack, 47; against formation of regular army, 86; occupies mountain passes and isolates Turkish army, 106, 109-10, 235; some British Philhellenes’ enraptured impression of, 171; holds Nauplia until civil war, 228; his son Panos besieged there by Condurittos’ forces, 228; paid from English loan to give up Nauplia, 230; rebels against the Government, 231; surrenders, 232; urges Sir Richard Church to take command in Greece, 319, 321; claims his own supporters constitute the legitimate National Assembly at Castri, 325; asks for American help, 337; Howe (q.v.) defies order from, 340. Fig. 6

Colombian Government, 217

Comboti, 96; Philhellene success at, 97, 99

Company of Philhellenes, 322

Conduriottis: Hydriote shipowner and President of Greece, 228; plans to attack rival leaders, 325

Constant, Benjamin, 270

Constantinople, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 20, 21 fn., 24, 28, 30, 38, 80, 92, 112, 226, 227, and passim. Patriarch of, see Gregorios

Constitution of Epidaurus, 94

’Constitution, The’; rallying cry of liberal opinion, 30

Contostavlos, Greek financial agent in New York, 311-12

Conty, Paul (alias of Santa Rosa, q.v.), 254

Corfu: local school assumes ancient name as Academy of Korkyra, 21

Corinth, 16, 20, 24, 86, 87, 88, 94, 95, 97; massacre at, 76; disillusioned European volunteers congregate at, and revert to carefree way of life, 88; gulled by charlatans, 89; Turkish army reaches, 105. Fig. 2

Cos, 5, 24

Crete, 2, 226, 227, 230, 234, 287, 334

Critchley. See Thompson

Crown Prince of Prussia, 64, 69

Croze, Hippolyte de: French naval officer and Philhellene, 283, 354

Crusaders, 29, 128-31 Cyprus, 5, 129, 130

Dalberg, Baron, Bavarian friend of the cause, 63, 65, 67, 75

Dalberg, Duc de, 270

Damala (ancient Troezen): rival ’Governments’ meet and elect Capodistria (q.v.) President of the Greek Republic for seven years, 326

Dania, Italian Philhellene, 96, 99, 107; Genoese refugee and ex-French cavalry officer, 33; his plan for capture of Nauplia by Regiment Baleste, 47; its failure, 48, 49; becomes company commander, 90; success at Comboti, 96-7; killed at Peta, 101. Fig. 13

Danube; Danubian Provinces, 2, 5, 6, 7, n, 2 5, 27, 315, 332

Darmstadt, 63, 65, 69; Greek Committee, 120; von Dittmar’s warnings about Kephalas (q.v.) unheeded, 120

Death of Demosthenes, The, performed at Odessa Greek Theatre, 20

Delacroix, Ferdinand Victor Eugène, French painter: ’Scenes from the Massacres of Scio’, 269; ’Greece expiring on the Ruins of Missolonghi’, 243, 269; paints portrait of Washington (q.v.), 281; consults Voutier (q.v.) about Grecian details, 288. Fig. 11, 24

Demetrios (Demetrius, Demetra), St., 8, 197

Demosthenes, 15, 5 7, 62, 76, 298, 326

Denmark, 64, 66, 98; King of, pays debts of

Danish Philhellenes, 112

De Pauw, Cornelius: Recherches Philosophiques sur les Grecs, 370

De Pradt: De la Grèce dans ses Rapports avec l’Europe, 372

Deptford Dockyard, London, 177, 226, 303

Der Fretschutz (Weber), 290 fn.

Dickens, Charles: American Notes, 347. See Howe

Didot, French publisher, 270

Dikaios, Archimandrite, 237

Dionysus (St. Dionysus), 197

Dittmar, von, Prussian Philhellene, 119-20, 122-3, 175, 178; killed at Missolonghi, 242

Dodwell, Edward: Classical and Topographical Tour, 370

Don Juan (Byron), 18-19, 139

Douglas, Hon. F. S. N.: Ancient and Modern Greeks, 369

Downing. See Kirkwood

Drovetti, French consul in Cairo, 273

Duke of York’s Greek Light Infantry, 319, 320

Dumas, Alexandre: philhellenic dithyramb, 269

East India Company, 130, 222, 307

Egypt, 25, 31, 92, 112, 135, 196; Pasha of, 57, 114, 225-7; Philhellene officers recruited to train army, 114; French influence in, 273. And see Mehemet Ali

Egyptian fleet: Cochrane’s abortive operation against at Alexandria, 331; destruction of in battle of Navarino, 313

Elgin, 7th Earl of, 58

Ellice, Edward, M.P., member of London Greek Committee, 146, 210, 222, 303, 308; his speculations in Greek bonds, 211, 221. Fig. 9

Eleusis, 317, 324, 327

English, Lieutenant George Bethune: U.S. negotiator with Turkey for commercial treaty on trade in the Levant, 300-1; he becomes a Moslem, 300

Epaminondas, 20, 59 fn., 67, 316

Epidaurus, 94, 228

Epirus, 6, 24, 44, 92, 94, 95, 96, 99; disastrous expedition to, 103, 173

Erskine, Thomas, Lord: A Letter to the Earl of Liverpool on the Subject of the Greeks, 58, 373

Eton, W.: A Survey of the Turkish Empire, 368

Euboea, 283-4, 291, 318

European Congress (1814), 319-20

Everett, Professor Edward, U.S. (Boston), friend of the cause, 60, 312, 338

Examiner, The, 24, 371, 372, 375, 378, 383

Exmouth, Admiral Lord, 307

Extermination, mutual incitement to, by Greek and Moslem religious leaders, 9, 10, 12

Eynard, J. G., banker and leader of Swiss Greek Societies, 272, 285, 312; organizes shiploads of provisions during Greek famine, 334-5

Fabvier, Colonel Charles (aliases: Borel; Morel; Cabillo Tores), French Philhellene, 244-50, 260, 263, 268, 323; his military career with Napoleon, 245; in anti- Bourbon conspiracy, 245-6; watched by French secret police, 245, 246, 247; darts about Western Europe in disguise, 246-7; contracts with Greek Government to establish an agricultural and industrial colony, 247; his hatred of the British, 248, 249; his undertaking to raise and command a Greek regular army, 249-50, 253; portraits of, 269; imposes European training methods on new army, 277-9; setback by General Roche’s arrival, 279; friction with Raybaud (q.v.), 282; Roche discredited, 282; the new army of regulars goes into battle and is defeated, 283-6; he quells a mutiny, 286; arrival of money holds the corps together, 285; given belated support by Paris Greek Committee, 286-7; his Bonapartism becomes irrelevant, 287; unimpressed by the Committee, 290; constructs a training base at Methana, 291; unsuccessful attempts at Athens, 317-19; mistrusts the Captains, 318; feels insulted by appointment of an Englishman (Sir Richard Church, q.v.) to command the land forces, 318, 321-2; besieged in the Acropolis of Athens, 318; Greeks agree to surrender Acropolis, 329; Fabvier refuses to cooperate with Church and again retires to Methana, 329; failure of his expedition to Chios, 349; quarrels with Capodistria, 349; returns to France, 349. Fig. 20

Fallmerayer, Jakob Philipp, German historian: held that Modern Greeks were of mainly Slav origin, 351; Geschichte der Halbinsel Morea, 391

Famine in Greece, 334

Féburier, Théophile, French poet and Philhellene, 268; La Corse, l’Ile d’Elbe, Les Grecs, et Sainte Hélène, 363, 387

Feldhann, Gustav, German theology student and Philhellene: killed at Peta, 116; Kreuz- und Querzüge oder Abentheuer eines Freiwilligen, 363, 373, 374, 375

Fénelon, François de Salignac de Mothe: Adventures of Telemachus, 367 Finlay, George, British Philhellene, 175, 176 and fn., 178, 335; on mis-spending of English gold, 232; his History of the Greek Revolution, 363, 378, 384, 391; ’An Adventure during the Greek Revolution’ (in Blackwood’s Magazine), 363, 378, 380; ’Biographical Sketch of Frank Abney Hastings’ (ibid.), 365, 380, 388, 390

Fitzjames, Duc de, 270

Foreign Enlistment Act, 136, 305, 328

Foreign Legion, Liberal (in Spain), 252

Frankfurt, 65, 69, 72

Freemasons, 31, 259, 352

France, 30, 31, 56-7, 66, 71; invades Spain, 244

French Government: its ambivalent attitude to Greek Revolution, 57, 65; and Russian aims, 134; aid to Egyptians, 136; preoccupied with Spain until 1823, 263; successful invasion of Spain followed by French fears of British ascendancy in Greece, 263; plan for Franco-Russian cooperation to exclude Britain, 264; intrigues to provide Greece with a French king, 264- 6; Duke of Nemours favoured, 265; turns from toleration of French philhellenism to active encouragement, but also continues to support Mehemet Ali, 267, 273, 274; uses Paris Greek Committee as a political front, 272-3; sends ’secret’ military mission to Egypt, 274; builds warships for Egypt to conquer Greeks, 275; the ships under construction at Marseilles simultaneously with departure of Philhellenes to Greece, 275; Government duplicity stirs indignation, leading to attempt to burn one of the ships, 275-6; adopts pro-Greek policy after battle of Navarino, 332

French philhellenism: its slow impact, 267; upsurge after Byron’s pilgrimage and death, 267-9; intensified by destruction of Missolonghi, 269; spate of books on Greece, 270; first French philhellenic expedition sails, under command of Raybaud (q.v.), 281; its disintegration, 282- 3. Fig. 22, 23

French Revolution, 14, 30, 271

’Friedel von Friedelsburg, Baron’, artist and bogus Danish count, 89, 90, 175, 177, 376 Friend of the Law, 187 Friendly Society: formed (c. 1814) secretly by Greeks in Russia to promote revolution in the Ottoman Empire, 9-11, 22, 31, 63, 92, 133; appoints Demetrius Hypsilantes to lead revolt in Greece, 25

Galloway, Alexander, London marine engineer appointed to supply steam engines for Greek warships, 303; the firm’s double-dealing with Turks and Greeks, 309. Fig. 15

Gait, John: Letters from the Levant, 369

Gamba, Count Peter, Byron’s secretary, 153, 174-5, 183, 291; A Narrative of Lord Byron’s Last Journey to Greece, 363, 381, 385

Gambier, Admiral James, Baron, 304

Garel, French Philhellene, survivor of battle of Peta, 288, 388

Gell, Sir William, 192; Narrative of a Journey in the Morea, 372, 382

Genocide, 12

Georgios, St., 8

German Legion, 119-26, 161, 302, 379; its failure due to lack of money, 228. And see Kephalas

Ghouras, Captain of Greek irregulars: turns on Odysseus and contrives his murder, 292

Gibassier, French ex-officer, 247; captured and put to death by Turks, 385

Germany, 30, 60-5, 66, 71

Gilman, ’Baron’: doubtful title of a member of the Byron Brigade, 177; killed at Psara, 181

Gogos, local Greek Captain, 98; his unreliability, 99; deserts at Peta, 100

Gold, English: arrival of instalments of London loan transforms Greek politics, 228-9; brings first civil war to an end, 229; Colocotrones paid to give up Nauplia, 229; financial anarchy, 229; Odysseus and other chieftains determine to share, 229; the money diverted to shipowners, 229; leads to second civil war, 229-30; weakening effect on Greek fleet, 231; more and more on Government payroll, 232; English sovereigns disappear from circulation, 232; many melted down, 232. And see Loans to Greek Government

Gordon, Thomas, British Philhellene, formerly an army officer: 138, 143, 168, 174, 177, 178, 210, 212, 214, 281-2, 287, 302; his practical advice to London Greek Committee, 156-7; arrives in Greece with money from London, 286; commands an attempt to relieve the Acropolis, 323; gives up command because of Greeks’ insubordination, 324; eventually settled at Argos and commanded expedition against klephtic bands, 350; his History of the Greek Revolution, 363, 371, 377, 379, 383, 384, 386, 387, 388. Fig. 10

Gosse, Dr. Louis-André, Swiss member of relief commission in Greece, 335; Lettres à sa mère pendant son séjour en Grèce, 363, 388

Grasset, Edouard, Mavrocordato’s secretary, 186; his Souvenirs de Grèce, 363, 384

Greece Regenerated, 62. See Krug

Greece, independence of formally recognized by the Allied Powers, 349; Otho of Bavaria becomes King, 349; racked by civil strife, 350; the Captains gradually brought under control by Government in Athens, 350-1; persistence of belief in identity of Ancient and Modern Greeks, 351

Greek Chronicle, 185, 240

Greek Church, 7, 8, 197

Greek Deputies (Louriottis and Orlandos) in London, 207, 253, 257; accept loan for Greek Government, 209-12; ’contest in mutual blackmail’ with Bowring (q.v.), 212; their involvement with the ’Greek bubble’, 212-23 passim; ’hardened embezzlers and double-dealers’, 220; collections from U.S. handed over to them disappear, 299; approach to Rush (q.v.) about American-built warships, 301; they send General Lallemand to U.S. as agent, 302; project for mercenary army, 302-3; contract for building a corvette at Deptford, 303; and Admiral Cochrane, 305-6; fiasco of shipbuilding failures, 308- 13; exhaustion of funds, 310-11; new agent, Contostavlos, sent to New York, 311; uncompleted ships left to rot in the Thames, 313

Greek fleet: money from English loan paid to strengthen fleet has opposite effect, 231

Greek Government, 164-6; need for money, 127; negotiations for loans, 128-31; ’treaty’ with Knights of Malta, 129-30; thanks Jeremy Bentham, 148-9; Conduriottis’ Government aims to control Colocotrones, 228; receives instalments of London loan, 228; previous failures due to lack of money, 228; defeats by Arabs under Ibrahim, 233-7; Greek offer to put country under British rule (Act of Submission) declined, 237, 279; asks Fabvier (q.v.) to raise and command a regular army, 249, 253

Greek language: a link between Ancient and Modern Greece, 351 and fn.

Greek Revolution: outbreak of, 19; the news reaches Western Europe, 23; false rumours of victories, 24; local methods of warfare different from European, 37-8; customary slaughter of prisoners, 38; the Revolution of intense interest in many countries, 51; distortion of news, 51; causes more than 50,000 casualties up to summer 1822, 92; conflicting aims of leaders, 95, 98-9

Greek Societies: attempts to suppress unfavourable reports by returning Philhellenes, 115; some genuine accounts published, 116

Greek Telegraph, 187

Greeks, Modern: problem of their descent, 15-16, 52; European view of, in Middle Ages and Renaissance, 16; books on (1770- 1821), 368-9; dislike of Western Europeans, 35

Gregorios, Patriarch of Constantinople, 3-4, 5, 12

Gubernatis, Italian survivor of battle of Peta: given command of remnants of The Regiment and marches them to Amphissa, 102; reaches Nauplia with 135 men, 106-7; a professional soldier of fortune, only technically a Philhellene, 108; after disbandment of The Regiment goes to Egypt, receives commission from Mehemet Ali and trains Moslem troops, 108, 235, 273

Guiccioli, Countess, 151

Guilford, Lord: founds a Hellenic University in Corfu, 21

Guys, M. de: Voyage Littéraire de la Grèce, 368

Haldenby, British Philhellene, 139, 380

Hamburg, 63, 67

Harcourt, Comte Emanuel d’, agent of the Paris Greek Committee, 270, 286

Harmodius, 24, 350

Harmodius and Aristogeiton, performed at Odessa Greek Theatre, 20

Harring, Harro Paul, 374; Tragikomische Abenteuer eines Philhellenen, 363

Hastings, Frank Abney, 87, 138, 301 fn., 307, 375; his naval career, and dismissal, 294-5; goes to Greece as a volunteer and uses his wealth to subsidize Philhellene friends, 295; serves on sea and land, 295; insists naval superiority essential to Greek success, and advises purchase of steam vessel, 297; offers to contribute £5,000, 297; sails for Greece in command of new vessel Perseverance, 310, 323; burst boilers and engine failure en route, 309-10; is killed in 1828, 349. Fig. 25. And see under Finlay

Heideck (Heidegger), Colonel Karl Freiherr von, Bavarian Philhellene, 322-3; unsuccessful attack at Oropos, 325; on international relief commission, 335. Die Bayerische Philhellenfahrt, 363, 389. Fig. 30

Hellenic University, Corfu, 21

Hexamilia, 346-7

Hill, Rev. John: his famous school in Athens, 204

Hobe, Baron, Bavarian Philhellene, killed by Mignac (q.v.) in duel, 96, 376, John Cam, M.P., member of London Greek Committee, 146, 150, 152, 170, 206, 210, 212, 214, 222, 299, 312; Journey through Albania, 369. Fig. 15

Hölderlin, Johann Christian Friedrich,

German poet: Hyperion, 61

Holland, Henry: Travels in the Ionian Islands, 370

Homer, 38, 201, 268, 298, 322

Hosemann, J. J.: Les Etrangers en Grèce, 387

Howe, Samuel Gridley, qualified Boston surgeon and U.S. Philhellene: becomes army surgeon in Greece and ship’s doctor, 337; with Jarvis and Miller (qq.v.) launches appeal for American help, 337; the three resign from military service to concentrate on relief work, 338-40; defies order from Colocotrones, 340; describes a typical day, 341; establishes a hospital at Poros, 342; undertakes a fundraising campaign in U.S., 343-4; returns to Greece, finds hospital closed (see Russ), devises employment scheme for refugees, 344-6; founds a refugee colony at Hexamilia and names it Washingtonia, 346-7; returns to U.S. and accomplishes valuable philanthropic work, 347 (see Dickens’s American Notes); his wife, Julia Ward Howe, famous as author of ’The Battle Hymn of the Republic’, 547; Letters and Journals, 363, 385, 388, 390, 391

Hughes, Rev. Thomas Smart, 59, 145, 201; Travels in Sicily, Greece, etc., 370; An Address to the People of England in the Cause of the Greeks, 373; Considerations upon the Greek Revolution, 373

Hugo, Victor: Ode, ’The Heads of the Seraglio’, 269

Hume, Joseph, M.P., member of the London Greek Committee, 146, 210, 299; his speculations in Greek bonds, 211, 214, 222. Fig. 15

Humphreys, William H., 175, 179, 213, 245, 291; First Journal of the Greek War of Independence, 139, 363, 371, 372, 378, 380; ’Adventures of an English Officer in Greece’ (in New Monthly Magazine), 384, 385; A Picture of Greece in 1825, 363

Hussein, Mehemet Ali’s son-in-law, 227

Hutchings, Lieutenant. See St. George

Hydra, island, 2, 9, 25, 164, 166, 230, 274, 325; German Legion at, 122-4; coining sovereigns into piastres, 232; Hydriote sailors refuse to go to sea without pay, 292

Hypsilantes, Prince Alexander: leads abortive revolt, 2-3, 5, 25, 36 fn.; flees to Austria, 6; issues proclamations instead of making military preparations, 23-4; his classical and historical allusions understood by few, 23-4; false rumours of victories, 24

Hypsilantes, Demetrius, brother of Alexander, 34, 36, 37, 57, 77, 83, 85, 87, 89, 410 That Greece Might Still Be Free 93, 186, 302; appointed by the Friendly Society (q.v.) to lead the revolt in Greece, 25; issues grandiloquent proclamations, 25-6; engages Baleste (q.v.) to raise a regiment as nucleus of a Greek national army, 26; expectation of Russian help against Turks, 26; spends his fortune to equip the Regiment, 26-7; not accepted as leader by all local Greeks, 26; irregulars restrained from killing him by Colocotrones, 37; and Turkish surrender at Monemvasia, 41; his Provisional Government, 43; summons Baleste’s Regiment to Tripolitsa, 43, 44; his money runs out, 44; the Regiment near destitution, 44; marches them to Patras, 44; his loss of prestige, 45; moves to Corinth, 49; declares intention to form new regiments, 88; loses all authority, 94; succeeded by Mavrocordato, 94; occupies and defends old castle of Argos, 105-6. Fig. 6

Ibrahim, son of Mehemet Ali: his conquests in Arabia, 226; invades the Peloponnese and besieges Navarino, 233-4 and fn., 249; Europeans in his army, 234-5; defeats Greek attempt to relieve Navarino, and compels capitulation of town, 235-6; his magnanimity, 236; recaptures three largest towns, 237; his methods become ruthless, 237-8; retires with his army to the Morea, 292; alleged intentions there, 316; his devastations in the Morea, 334

Iken, Karl: Hellenion, 374

Intelligence centres, British, 132-3, 279

International opinion concerning the Greek Revolution, 51 ff.

loannina, 6, 10, 92

Ionian Islands, 21, 22, 28, 29, 37, 45, 51, 98, 135, 136, 152, 170, 177, 179, 196, 264, 279; quarantine in, 111; Philhellene refugees well received by British authorities and given food and clothing, in; Byron in, 173; missionaries in, 199; Sir Richard Church’s success in, 319-20; pro-Capodistria party in, 325-6

Irving, Washington, 60

Isaiah: Cochrane refers Mehemet Ali’s attention to 31st chapter of, 313

Islam, crusade against, 66. And see Moslems

Italy, 9, 25, 26, 30, 65, 66, 112, 137, 152; revolutions in, 30, 31, 87; put down ruthlessly by Austria, 31; Italian Philhellenes in Greece, 32, 33, 88, 251-62 Ithaca, 319

Jacobs, Professor, head of the Philhellene movement at Gotha, 64

Janissaries, Corps of, 290 fn.; exterminated by Mahmoud, 261-2

Jarvis, George, ’rough American from Hamburg’, 138, 175; walks from Hamburg to Marseilles, 336; goes with Hastings (q.v.) to Greece, adopts Albanian dress, and becomes a tough Greek Captain, 336; with Howe and Miller (qq.v.) launches an appeal for American help, 337; the three resign from military service to devote themselves to relief work in Greece, 338- 40; Jarvis dies of disease at Argos, aged thirty-one, 344; Journal and Related Documents, 363, 374, 380, 384, 390

Jefferson, Thomas, 298

Jews, 8, 43, 45, 196

Joan of Arc: see Boubolina

Jourdain, Count, French naval ex-captain : ’admiral’ of Philhellenes in Marseilles, 87; and Knights of Malta, 129, 140, 288; negotiations for loan to Greek Government, 130; Mémoires historiques et militaires sur les événements de la Grèce, 363, 375, 379, 388

Jowett, Rev. William, 196; Christian Researches in the Mediterranean, 382

Justin, French Philhellene, 287, 387

Kephalas, assumes title of ’Baron Kephalas of Olympus’ 120; well equipped Philhellene expedition sent to Greece under his command as German Legion, 120-1; embarks from Marseilles, 121-2; reaches Hydra but prevented from landing, 123-5; German Legion disintegrates, 125; death of Kephalas, 125; his proclamation, 379

Kindermann, Prussian ex-officer and Philhellene, 178, 181

Kirkwood, Lieutenant (assumed name of Downing, British naval officer), 328 and fn.

klephts, 8, 11, 12, 36, 37, 232, 235

Knights of Malta, 129-31, 133, 136, 140, 142, 165, 207, 216, 288, 299, 312

Kolbe, Sergeant, German Philhellene, 125, 161, 174

Komarones (’Cameron’), Hungarian Philhellene, 175

Korkyra, Academy of: see Corfu

Körring, pseudonym of a ’mysterious German’: member of relief commission, 335; campaigns later in Western Greece and dies of disease at Patras, 390

Kotsch, Maximilian von, German ex-officer and Philhellene: describes tortures by Greeks, 107; Reise eines deutschen Artillerie- Offiziers nach Griechenland, 363, 374, 377, 378, 379

Kotzebue, August Friedrich Ferdinand von, German dramatist: The Ruins of Athens, 61

Krøyer, Henrik; Danish Philhellene,

Erindringer of Henrik Krøyers Liv, 364, 374, 375, 382

Krug, Wilhelm Traugott: Leipzig professor: Greece Regenerated, 62, 64, 65, 66-7, 69, 373

Küchelbecker, Karlovich, friend of Pushkin, 371

Kydonies, 5, 20, 28, 334, 34261.

Laborde, Count Alexandre, 128, 270

Lacedaemon, 21, 200

Lafayette, Marquis de, 60, 218, 270, 298

Lafitte, French banker, 65; proposed loan to Greek Government, 128; on Paris Greek Committee, 270

Lallemand, General, Greek agent to U.S., 302, 311

Lansdowne, Marquis of, 58

Lantier, Etienne-François de: Travels of Antenor (Les Voyages d’Antenor en Grece et en Asie), 368

Larissa, 103, 104. Fig. 3

Lancaster, Joseph, Quaker educationist, 160; his educational theories, 188

Lancastrian school, Lambeth, London, 189;

Lancastrian schools in Greece, 202, 347

Lasky, Prussian ex-officer and Philhellene: wounded in duel with Chevalier (q.v.), 74, 90; killed at Peta, 101

Launay: see Bellier de Launay

Laurent, Peter Edmund: Recollections of a Classical Tour, 370

Lee, George, Louriottis’ (q.v.) secretary, 220

Leghorn, see Livorno

Leipzig, 63, 69

Lempriere, John: Classical Dictionary, 58

Leonidas, 24, 200, 268, 269. And see Botsaris

Leopold of Saxe Coburg, candidate for Greek throne, 348 and fn.

Le Roy, Bayard and Company: see Bayard

Letellier, leader of French naval mission to Mehemet Ali, 332 fn.

Leukas (Santa Maura), 21

Levant, The, 29, 80, 131, 196, 201, 258, 300-1, 315; and passim

Liberal Foreign Legion (in Spain), 252

Liberals, 57 and passim

Lieber Franz: Tagebuch meines Aufenthaltes in Griechenland, 364, 376, 378, 379

Lieven, Princess, 314 Livron, General de, member of French military mission to Mehemet Ali, 274, 275, 282

Livorno, 28, 29, 32, 75, 247

Loans to Greek Government, 128, 129, 148, 166; influence of London Stock Exchange, 130, 136, 142, 148: first loan floated, 209; second loan, 214; Bowring’s proposals, 148; his suspect dealings, 211-21 passim; instalments of first London loan reach Zante, 180; held in bank there, 210-11, 214; released to Greeks, 215; administrative deductions from loan, 209; ’sordid dramas behind the scenes’, 217-20; eventual collapse of the ’Greek bubble’, 225; contemporary cartoon of loan scandal, Fig. 15, generous settlement, 223; decisive influence of loans on outcome of the war, 295

London Greek Committee, 140, 143, 145, 146, and passim; recruits Byron, 150-2; its Benthamite plans for Greece, 155; and the Greek Deputies (q.v.), 207; connection with first London loan to Greek Government, 209-16 passim

London Missionary Society, 196-7, 199

London, Treaty of, 315, 316-17, 330

Loughnan, Son, and O’Brien, London bankers and contractors for first Greek loan, 209

Louis, St., 57

Louis-Philippe, King of France, 265, 349

Louriottis, Andreas: see Greek Deputies

Lübtow, Adolph von, German Philhellene, 153 fn.; killed at Missolonghi, 242, 381

Ludwig, King of Bavaria, sends party of Philhellenes to Greece, 322-3; his son Otho becomes first King of Greece, 322, 348

Lyons Greek Society, 69

Macedonia, 2, 6

Madrid, 140, 142

Mahmoud, Sultan, 3, 4, 10; his unsuccessful attempts to put down Greek rebellion, 224; alliance with Mehemet Ali, 225-7; jubilation at the fall of Missolonghi, 242

Maina; Mainotes: 24, 105, 165; plunder

Peloponnese villages, 36; at Monemvasia, 41

Malta, 112, 196, 245, 246, 304; Knights of, 129-31, and see under Knights; Missionary Presses, 202

Malvasia: see Monemvasia

Marengo, 57, 258

Mari, alias Bekir Aga: a ’sinister Frenchman’ and former Corsican drum major, suspected Turkish agent, later in Egyptian army, 89, 235, 273, 379

Marmont, Marshal, 245

Marseilles, 23, 28, 29, 40, 57, 65, 98, 112, 225; embarkation port for Philhellene volunteers (1821-2), 66-77; French Government closes the port, 125; ban lifted, 272

Masonic Lodges, 271. And see Freemasons

Massacres of Turks, 1-3, 1 1 -12, 78, 328-9; of Greeks, 4-5, 6, 1 2 ; estimate of numbers killed, 7

Mauromichali, Pietro, ’Commander-in- Chief of the Spartan and Messenian Forces’, 13. And see Petro Bey

Mavrocordato, Alexander, 27, 32, 36 fn., 83, 85, 87, 96, 165, 166; a Constantinople nobleman and friend of Byron and Shelley, he arrives in Greece and aspires to supplant Demetrius Hypsilantes as Greek national leader, 28; at siege of Patras, 40; declares intention of forming new regiments, 88; becomes nominal head of Greek Government, 89; takes command of newly formed volunteer battalion, 90; appointed President and Chief Executive of independent Greece, 94; desperately in need of a success, 94-5; march to Peta, 97; plans betrayed by a deserter, 97; refuses action against treacherous Gogos, 99; holds council of war, 99; disregards General Normann’s misgivings, 99-100; defeat at Peta, 101; approves a scheme to bring a large army of German and Swiss volunteers to Greece, 119; flees to Hydra, 166; his acid comment on Voutier’s memoirs, 288. Fig. 6

Mehemet Ali, Pasha of Egypt, 108, 136; Albanian peasant by birth, 225; his service in Turkish army against Napoleon, 225; defeats a British force, 225; massacres Mamelukes and becomes sole ruler of Egypt, 225; rebuilds army and navy on modern European methods, 226; his sons Ibrahim and Ismael’s conquest in Arabia and Sudan, 226; agrees to cooperate with Sultan Mahmoud to crush Greek rebellion, 226; jubilation at fall of Missolonghi, 242; Western Europeans in his service, 258; aims to limit his area of operations, 292; Cochrane’s ironical messages to, 313, 331; his fleet at Alexandria, 331; destroyed at Navarino, 331; Fig. 16

Methana: Fabvier makes it a military stronghold and training base for his troops after failure at Euboea, 291; renames it Tacticopolis, 291; winters there, 318; retires there again after surrender of the Acropolis, 329

Metternich, Prince, Austrian Foreign

Minister, 31, 44, 52, 57, 125, 314, 315

Meyer, Johann Jakob, Swiss Philhellene, 175, 178, 375; becomes first editor of the Greek Chronicle, 186, 187; killed at Missolonghi, 242

Miaulis, Greek Admiral: his son sent to France for education, 269

Mignac, French fencing master, 96; kills Hobe (q.v.) in duel, 96, 377; killed at Peta, 101

Military techniques: European, 37, 40, 45, 85-6, 97, no, 226, 235, 285; Greek, 37-40, 48, 109-110, 235; Turkish, 38; Egyptian (Arab), 226, 235-6

Mill, John Stuart, 147

Miller, Jonathan Peckham, American Philhellene, 336; with Jarvis (q.v.) in Greece, 336; fights at Nauplia and is called ’Yankee Dare-devil’, 337; with Howe (q.v.) and Jarvis launches appeal for American help, 337; the three resign from military service to devote themselves to relief work in Greece, 338-40; Miller returns to U.S., 344; The Condition of Greece in 1827 and 1828, 364, 390

Miller, Loukas Miltiades: Greek orphan adopted by Jonathan Miller; joins U.S. army, rises to Colonel, and later becomes a Congressman, 342

Millingen, Dr. Julius, Byron’s physician, 183; becomes doctor to Sultans in Constantinople, 236; Memoirs of the Affairs of Greece, 364, 379, 381, 382, 385, 388. And see Osman Bey

Mishellenes: Philhellenes who became pro-Turkish, 350

Mission Press, Malta, 202

Mission schools, 204

Missionaries, Protestant, 21, 195-6; norecord of converts, 204

Missolonghi, 82, 94, 95-6, 97, 258; Greeks there refuse to supply compatriots with food, 98; funeral for Philhellenes killed at Peta, 101; panic in, 102; steps taken to resist a siege, 102; Turks reach gates of, 102; first siege of by Turks, 108. Fig. 8; assaults repulsed, 108-9; attempted retreat fails and besiegers annihilated, 109; triumph of the Captains, 109-10; Byron at, 169-80; false reports of, 218-19 and fn.; besieged by new Ottoman forces reinforced by Ibrahim’s Arabs, 238; sortie en masse by starving inhabitants fails, town is captured and becomes a smoking ruin, 241-2; its fall one of the decisive events of the war, 242; since Byron’s death, the most famous town in modern Greece and the symbol of the Greek War of Independence, 243; tragedy of, leads to a resurgence of philhellenic feeling throughout Europe, 243; Delacroix’s and Scheffer’s paintings of, 269. Fig. 24

Modon, 82, 85, 105, 233, 238

Monemvasia, 24 and fn., 46, 82; Turkish capitulation at, and plunder by Greeks, 41; nothing gained by Hypsilantes’ Provisional Government, 43

Monroe, President, 299

Monteverde, Italian Philhellene, joins the Turks as artillery officer 261; killed and beheaded by Suliotes, 261

Morandi, Antonio, Italian Philhellene, 257,

262; Il mio Giornale dal 1848 al 1850, 364, 385, 388

Morea; Moreotes, 27, 28, 35, 36, 37, 43, 109, 127, 129, 165, 166, 174, 188, 226, 227, 229, 231, 234, 235, 236, 238. And see Peloponnese

Morel: alias of Fabvier, q.v.

Moslems, 2, 4, 7, 80, 196; advancement of converts, 9

Müller, Friedrich, German Philhellene, his tomb at Nauplia, 352

Munich, 63, 69

Murat, Napoleon-Achille, 253

Murray, Lord Charles, British Philhellene, 181-2

Musical instruments, 122, 158, 290m.

Napier (Sir) Charles James, 167-8, 174, 209, 210, 302-3, 320; his craving for military glory, 302; The War in Greece, 381; Greece in 1824, 381

Naples: revolution in 30, 31, 32, 257, 319; extinguished by Austrians, 244; King Ferdinand of, 253, 321

Napoleon, 2, 9, 19, 29, 32, 60, 71, 74, 129, 225, 234, 236, 245-6, 248, 257, 258, 268, 270, 283, 319, 321

Nauplia, 49, 50, 53, 76, 90, 94, 165, 174, 215, 216, 292; its strategic importance, 47; failure of Greek attempt to capture, 47-8, 87; Regiment Tarella maintains desultory siege there, 86; Turkish plans to relieve, but fail to reach the town, 105-6; the fortress surrenders and is plundered by the Greeks, 106-7; survivors rescued by H.M.S. Cambrian, 107; becomes seat of Government, 240; Fabvier at, 249; coal for English fleet arrives at, 293; monument to Philhellenes in Roman Catholic church at, 352. Fig. 32, 35

Navarino, 41, 46, 82, 83, 86, 258, 335; surrender of by Turks, and Greek slaughter of population, 41-3, 78; nothing gained by Hypsilantes’ Provisional Government, 43; Battle of Navarino: Turkish and Egyptian fleets destroyed by combined British, French and Russian squadrons, ’an untoward event’, that ensured the freedom of Greece, 331-3 Nemours, Duke of: 11-year-old son of the Duke of Orleans; plan to make him King of Greece, 265-6

Netherlands, 66, 246, 247, 271, 289

Normann, General, a Württemberg Count, 96-7, 99, 116, 153, 302, 329; appointed to command Philhellene volunteers, 74; his previous record, 74-5; sails from Marseilles with fourth expedition to Greece, 75, 83; arrival at Navarino, 84-5, 88; ignored by local leaders, 85-6; becomes chief of staff to Mavrocordato, 90; his misgivings before battle of Peta, 99; wounded there, 101; death of, 102. Fig. 10

Odessa, Greek theatre at, 20, 112

Odysseus, Androutses: Captain of Greek irregulars, 36, 227, 292, 295; the most powerful man in Eastern Greece, 103; his conversations with the Turks, 103; inability of Greek Government to control him, 103-4; kills Greek emissaries, 104; survives by double dealing, 110, 190; Stanhope (q.v.) won over by, 190, 239; is neutral in civil war, 230; expects share of English loan, 230; makes overtures to the Turks, 239; romantic Byronists’ mistaken view of, 239; murdered by Greeks and his body hung from walls of the Acropolis, 240. Fig. 6

Olivier, G. A.: Voyage dans l’Empire

Othoman, 369

Olympian Zeus, Temple of, 351

Opium trade from Smyrna a virtual U.S. monopoly, 300

Order of the Saviour of Greece, 352

Orelli, Professor, a leader in the Zürich Greek Society, 74

Oriental Spectator, 289

Orlandos: see Greek Deputies

Orléans, Duke of (later King Louis- Philippe), 264; employs General Roche as his emissary, 279

Oropos, 325

Osman Bey: name assumed by the son of Julius Millingen (q.v.), Byron’s physician; a pioneer of anti-semitic literature, 350

Otho, son of King Ludwig of Bavaria, installed as King of Greece, 348

Ottolenghi, Leone: La Vita e i Tempi di Giacinto Provana di Collegno, 366, 385, 386

Ottoman Government, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 24, 58, 79, 92, 143, 227; fails to reinforce its authority in Greece, 109; determined to crush the rebels, 165; refuses ’mediation’ by Britain, 316

Ottoman Empire, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 20, 24-5, 39, 78, 92, 93, 95, 135, 201; fleet, Turkish fleet; leaders of the Greeks in, 10; Christian missionaries in, 196; ally of Britain, 207; immense resources of, 224; alliance with Egypt to crush the Greeks, 225-7

Overseas Greeks turn philhellenism into a political programme, 19; their ’archaizing’ activities, 19; deceived by false reports of victories over the Turks, 25; rush to Greece, 25, 29, 31

Palma, Count Alerino, Italian Philhellene, 253, 254, 255. Greece Vindicated, 217, 364, 380, 382, 384, 385, 388

Pamphlet literature, 141 and fn., 143, 372-3, 389

Papal States, 32, 65

Paris Greek Committee (Société philanthropique en faveur des Grecs), the best organized of all philhellenic movements, 267; extends membership and influence, 270, 271; famous members of, 270; General Roche (q.v.) its official agent in Greece, 271, 272, 279-80; used as a political front by French Government, 272-3; sends first French expedition to Greece under the command of Raybaud, 281-3; Roche discredited and recalled, 282, 286; Committee decides to support Fabvier (q.v.), 286-7; sends further expeditions to Greece under Piscatory and Raybaud, 287; sends food to relieve Greek famine, 334

Parnassus, Mount, 197, 240. Fig. 26

Parthenon, 25, 55, 61, 242. And see Athens

Parry, William, British Philhellene, member of Byron’s Brigade, 157, 158, 160, 174, 177, 178, 179, 181, 183, 203, 282, 383. Pl. 8. The Last Days of Lord Byron, 364, 381

Patras, 174, 188; siege of, 40, 76, 109

Peacock, Robert: English agent for projected loan to Greek Government, 130, 207

Pecchio, Count, Italian Philhellene, 253, 255; disillusioned in Greece, 255. A Picture of Greece in 1821, 363, 385, 388

Pecorara, Count, Italian Philhellene, 255

Peloponnese, ’heartland of the Greek

Revolution’, 1, 7, 25, 26, 29, 33, 34, 36, 37, 83, 93; Moslem population in, 2; outbreak of revolution in, 11; genocide in, 12; false reports of Greek victories, 24; economy ruined by plundering Greek bands, 36; plague in, 45, 111; Greeks in complete control of, 92; refugees from Missolonghi, 102; Turks regain, 104; laid waste by Arabs, 238. And see Morea

Penn, William, 59

Pepe, General: leader of Neapolitan revolutionaries, 31, 251; Memoirs of General Pepe, 385

Pericles, 16, 20, 78, 82, 242; attempt to revive ’the language of Pericles’ in schools, 351 and fn., 352

Périer, Casimir, subscriber to Paris Greek Committee, 271 Persat, Bonapartist officer and volunteer in Greece, 287; in plot to rescue Napoleon from St. Helena, 32; fought with Bolivar and in Naples, 32; imprisoned by Austrians and escaped by killing guards, 32; Mémoires, 1806-1844, 364, 371, 375, 378, 379, 388

Peta, battle of, 97-101; village burned and sick decapitated by victorious Turks, 101; Philhellene casualties at, 101; deaths from disease after, 102; Western concept of a Greek nation-state destroyed, 110; aftermath of the battle, 111; misrepresented as a great Greek victory, 115

Petrini; Eynard’s agent for relief cargoes for Greece, 334-5

Petro Bey; leader of the Mainotes, 36, 165. And see Mauromichali

Phaleron, 318, 324, 327, 329

Phanariotes, 171

Philhellene Battalion, 90, 94, 95, 175; destroyed in battle of Peta, 101, 235; disbanded, 101

Philhellenes; Philhellenism: literary origins and romantic assumptions of, 16-22, 49, 61; list of travel books sympathetic to, 368- 70; becomes a political programme due to impetus from Greeks overseas, 19; only a thin veneer in Greece, 22; philhellenic ideas widespread, 52 ff.; ’above politics’, 53; philhellenic verse, 53-4; Shelley’s Hellas, 54; fed by false news, 55; support from university professors, 56-7; attitude towards in France, 56-7; in Britain, 57-9; in U.S., 59-60; in Germany, 60-5; volunteers of 1822, 66; quarrels among, 73-4, 83, 84-5, 95, 96; disillusioned returning volunteers, 75-7; their warnings disregarded, 76-7; wandering bands of, reduced to begging, 83-4, 86; protest at military inactivity presented to Greek Government, 88; volunteers organized into ’Battalion of Philhellenes’, 91; the Battalion at Peta, 98; fate of the eight expeditions from Marseilles, 111; reception in Europe of returning volunteers, 114-15; Greek Societies’ attempts to suppress facts, 115; fabricated news, 115; fate of German Legion, 119-26; the movement in France, 244-50; flood of philhellenic French poetry, after Byron’s death, 267-8; and prose works, 270; Philhellenes of the several nations united, 327; monument to at Nauplia, 352-3. Fig. 35

Philip of Macedon, 283, 326

Philomuse Society of Athens, 191-2

Philopoemen, 59, 60 fn.

Pichald: his tragedy, Leonidas performed in

Paris, 269

Piedmont: revolution in, 30, 31, 32, 120, 253, 257: extinguished by the Austrians, 244

Pisa, Colonel Vincenzo, Italian Philhellene, 257, 258, 290, 322

Piscatory, Théobald, French secret agent, 264; commands a Philhellenic expedition sent to Greece by the Paris Greek Committee, 287

Pistrucci, Italian poet, 257

Plato, 16, 201, 255, 322

Poe, Edgar Allan, 177 and fn.

Poerio, Colonel, Italian revolutionary, 251

Poros, 325, 326, 328 fn., 329

Porro, Count, Italian Philhellene, 255, 256

Portugal, 30, 31, 217, 246, 305

Pouqueville, F. C. H. L.: Voyage en Morée, 369; Voyage dans la Grèce, 369

Poyais, mythical South American Kingdom of, 207, 208

Prussia, 30, 31, 61, 62, 64-5, 67, 315

Psara, island, 2, 164, 181, 227, 228, 230, 274, 334

Pushkin, Alexander, 371

Quakers, 145, 161, 188

Quass, ’Baron’: doubtful title of a member of the Byron Brigade, 177

Raffenel, C. D., French Philhellene, Histoire des Événements de la Grèce, 364, 371, 388

Raybaud, Maxime, French Philhellene: retired from army, seeks employment in Greece, 281; on Mavrocordato’s staff at Peta, 281; later takes command of first French Philhellene expedition, 281-2; Raybaud returns to France, 282-3; commands a later expedition, 287; wounded in duel by Voutier (q.v.), 288; Mémoires sur la Grèce, 364, 367, 371, 372, 376, 377, 388

Regeneration: the philhellenic ideal for Modern Greece, 19, 65, 140, 185-94; not desired by Greek leaders in Greece, 22. Fig. 14

Regiment, The (or Regiment Baleste; later Regiment Tarella), 23-34; intended as nucleus of Greek national army, 26; not joined by local Greeks, 27; recruits mainly refugees, 27; about 200 men trained by European officers as a disciplined force, 27; never exceeded 300, 28; volunteers from abroad in, 28-9, 31-4; their disillusionment, 34; Regiment’s training watched with incomprehension by local population, 37; débâcle at Tripolitsa, 45; many die from starvation and plague, 45; Baleste suggests Regiment should kill Colocotrones, 46; reassembles at Argos, 47; plans for capture of Nauplia drawn up by Dania (q.v.), 47; attack fails, 48; Baleste joins revolt in Crete and command of the Regiment passes to Tarella (q.v.), 48; numbers reduced by plague, 48-9; remnants move to Corinth, 49; too few to prevent irregulars plundering the fortress (Acrocorinth), 49-50; desperate straits of remnant of Regiment, 87-8. Fig. 7

Relief measures in Greek famine, 334-47

Regiment Tarella, 48-9, 86, 94, 95, 97; preparations before battle of Peta, 98-100; early success in battle, 100; then flank turned by Turks, and Philhellenes wiped out, 100-1, 235; remnant commanded by Gubernatis (q.v.) reaches Nauplia, 106-7; disbanded, 108

Regnault, French Philhellene, 248, 285

Rheineck, Eduard von, German Philhellene: settles in Greece and has a magnificent tomb in Athens cemetery, 375

Rhigas, War Song of (translated by Byron), 20-1

Rhodes, 5, 24, 129

Ricardo, J. & S., London bankers and contractors for second Greek loan, 214, 220, 305, 310; exhaustion of funds, 310-311

Roche, General, official agent in Greece of Paris Greek Committee, 271, 272, 279-80, 290, 302; Duke of Orleans his real master, 272; backed by Lieutenant W. T. Washington (q.v.), protests to Greek Government about their request to Britain to take over the country, 280; the protest a fiasco, 280; and first French Philhellenic expedition, 281-2; is discredited, 282

Rochelle, La: the four sergeants of, 142, 245, 254

Rogers, Samuel, English poet, 145

Romania; Romanians, 2, 3, 7, 92

Romei, Giovanni, refugee from Piedmont, becomes Colonel of Engineers in Egyptian service, 258; changes sides and supplies Rossaroll with military intelligence about Ibrahim’s forces, 259-60; detected and dismissed, 260

Rossaroll, General, Napoleonic ex-officer and Neapolitan revolutionary, 252-3, 258- 60

Rossetti, Dante Gabriel, 257 fn.

Rossetti, Gabriele, 257

Rossini, Gioacchino Antonio: The Siege of Corinth, 269; overtures, 290 fn.

Rothschilds, 206, 208 fn.

Roumeli; Roumeliotes, 35, 109, 174, 188, 227, 228, 231, 235, 238, 317, 334

Rush, Richard, U.S. Minister in London: approached by Greek Deputies (q.v.) about building warships in U.S., 301; U.S.

Philhellene money sent to Deputies via

Rush, 338

Russ, Dr.: U.S. relief agent in Greece: takes charge on a year’s contract of Poros hospital established by Howe (q.v.) and closes it before Howe’s return from U.S., 344 and fn.

Russell, Lord John, member of the London Greek Committee, 143

Russia, 2-3, 5, 6, 7, 25, 31, 134-5; breaks away from Austria and Prussia and signs Anglo-Russian Protocol and Treaty of London, 315; delighted by battle of Navarino and declares war on Turkey, 332, 349

Sacred Battalion: name suggested but not adopted for the ’Battalion of Philhellenes’, 90

Sacred Company, formed by volunteers of several nationalities, 47; disbanded after failure at Nauplia, 48

St. André, Dr., French Philhellene: changes sides and joins Mehemet Ali, 235

St. George, Captain (assumed name of Lieutenant Hutchings), 328

St. Jean d’Angely, Regnault de (later Marshal of France), French Philhellene, 248, 285

St. John of Jerusalem, The Order of the Knights Hospitaller of: dealings with Greek Government, 129-31. And see Knights of Malta

St. Louis, 57

St. Paul, 197, 199, 202, 316

St. Vincent, John Jervis, Admiral Earl, 305

Salonika, 6, 103, 198

Santa Maura (renamed Leukas), 21, 319

Santa Rosa (Santorre Annibale di Rossi di Pomarolo Conte di Santa Rosa), a leader in Piedmont revolution and later ’the most famous of all Italian Philhellenes’, 254; alias Paul Conty, 254; refugee in France and England before leaving for Greece, 254, 255; and Plato, 255; unwelcome in Greece; 256; requested to change his name and becomes Count Derossi, 256; fights as ordinary soldier in Albanian dress against Arabs, 256; killed at Sphacteria, 256-7. Fig. 20

Sardinia, King of, 130

Sass, Adolph von, Swedish Philhellene, 175, 179, 381

Sass, Karl, Swedish Philhellene, 381

Savary, M., Lettres sur la Grèce, 368

Scarpa, Italian refugee in Ibrahim’s forces, 258, 386; changes sides and joins Fabvier, 260; dies of disease, 260

Scheffer, Ary: ’The Taking of Missolonghi’(painting), 269

Scott, Sir Walter, 1 44, 240

Scottish Ladies Society for Promoting the Moral and Intellectual Improvement of Females in Greece, 145

Scottish Missionary Society, 202

Scrofani, Xavier: Voyage en Grèce, 369

Sébastiani, General, member of the Paris Greek Committee, 270, 272

Secret Police, 29, 76, 134, 245, 246, 247, 272

Sève, Joseph-Antheleme. See Soleiman Bey

Shaftesbury, 3rd Earl of, 198

Shelley, P. B., Hellas, 54

Sheridan, Charles Brinsley: Thoughts on the Greek Revolution, 373, 380

Schweighauser, J.-G.: Discours sur les Services que les Grecs ont rendus à la Civilisation, 373

Slave markets, 5, 6, 80-81, 227, 238

Smyrna, 4, 5, 44, 112, 153, 175, 201, 261; Greek communities in, 25; British colony in, 182; opium trade, 300

Soleiman Bey (born Joseph-Antheleme Seve), leader of Europeans in Arab army, 234; earlier career in French service, 234; changes his name and becomes a Moslem, 234; becomes important in Mehemet Ali’s service, 235-273; Generalissimo of the Egyptian army, 349; as Soleiman Pasha is received in Paris by King Louis-Philippe and in London by the Prince Consort, 349; Marie E. Aimé Vingtrinnier: Soliman Pacha, 384

Sonnini, C. S.: Voyage en Grèce, 369

South America, 31, 32, 151, 217, 246, 304-5

Spain, 30, 31, 66, 98, 135, 152, 217, 304; ’The Constitution’ proclaimed in, 30; French invasion of, 244; Liberal Foreign Legion, 252

Spanish Greek Committee, 246 Spartans: ancient, 16; modern, 13, 14, 17, 24

Spetsae, island, 2, 9, 164, 166, 199, 200, 230, 274

Spyridon, St., 8

Stammler, Heinrich, German Philhellene, dancing master from Rostock, 72, 375, 378 Stanhope, Colonel the Hon. Leicester, 159- 63, 169, 180, 183, 204, 209, 210, 211, 213, 221, 222, 245, 272, 298 and fn.; quarrels with Byron, 170; publishes reminiscences of him, 170; ’apostle of utilitarianism’, 185; starts the Greek Chronicle, 186; on the freedom of the Press, 186; starts the Greek Telegraph, and Athens Free Press, 187; sets up Lancastrian schools in Greece, 188; dispensary at Missolonghi, 189; his efficiency and success, 189; won over by Odysseus, 190-3; establishes Philomuse Society of Athens, 192; taken in by Odysseus, 192-3, 240; ordered back to London, 193-4; suggests sending missionaries, 199; Greece in 1823 and 1824, 364, 379, 381, 382, 384, 387; The Press in India, 381

Staraba, ex-Sicilian Colonel, 33, 34

Stephanopoli, Dimo et Nicolo: Voyage en Grèce, 369

Stietz, Hessian ex-Colonel and Philhellene: discovers treachery of Gogos, 99

Stitzelberger, ex-officer from Baden: in command of Byron Brigade after death of Byron, 181; killed at Missolonghi, 242

Stock Exchange, London, 130, 136, 148, 304; flotation of first Greek loan, 209; subsequent history of the loan, 211-23

Stralendorf, Count, Mecklenburg Philhellene: killed in attack on the Acropolis and buried in the Theseum, 87

Stuttgart, 65, 69, 70, 72, 74; Greek Society, 115

Submarines, 307 fn.

Suicides, 113-14, 181

Suliotes, 94, 108, 174, 179, 235; evacuated to Ionian Islands, 102, 173

Sultan Mahmoud, 3, 4; considered by the powers as legitimate sovereign of the Greeks, 52

Sunday schools, 200

Sweden, 28, 66, 271

Switzerland, 31, 64, 66, 120, 272; Greek

Societies, 335; ’the Good Samaritan of Europe’, 335. And see Eynard

Syra, 112, 130, 232

Tacticopolis. See Methana

Tancoigne, J. M.: Voyage à Smyrne, 369

Tarella, Colonel, Italian Philhellene, 87, 89, 99, 108; Piedmontese refugee and exofficer in French army, 33; succeeds to command of Regiment Baleste after Nauplia disaster, 48-9; maintains desultory siege there, 86; killed at Arta, 101. And see Regiment Tarella

Tassi: ’a plausible Italian’ impostor at Tripolitsa, 43-4; killed at Peta, 101

Tersitsa, half-sister of Odysseus and wife of Trelawny, 240

Thermopylae, 24, 115

Theseum, 87

Thessaly, 2, 6, 92, 103, 105

Thiersch, Professor: admitted to the Friendly Society (q.v.), 63; issues a pamphlet, 64-5, 67; volunteers seek his advice, 69

Thompson, Mr.: assumed name of

Critchley, British naval officer, 328

Thornton, Thomas: The Present State of Turkey, 370

Times, The, 220-1

Travelling gentlemen, 14, 35, 139, 323

Treaty of London, 315, 316-17, 330

Trelawny, Edward John, 150 fn., 154, 175, 176, 178, 239-40, 330; becomes friendly with Odysseus and marries his half-sister, Tersitsa, 240; attempt to assassinate him, 240; leaves Greece in a British warship, 240; Recollections of the Last Days of Shelley and Byron, 364, 380

Trieste, 23, 25, 29, 41, 153

Tripolitsa, 2, 11, 47, 49, 58, 76, 77, 94, 101, 144, 145, 318; biggest town in Southern Greece, 43; its wealth, 43; falls to the Greeks, 44-6; massacre of population, 45, 78; Greek national treasury gains nothing, 45; atrocities abhorred by European volunteers, 46; plague breaks out, 45, 48. Fig. 31

Troezen. See Damala

Troy, 76, 77

Turkish fleet, 41, 165; driven from Calamata by Baleste’s bluff, 40, 85; bluffed again at Navarino, 85; still undefeated, 92; reinforced from Egypt and the Barbary States, 94; appears off Missolonghi, 102; sails round the Morea, 105; failure to coordinate with army, 105, 109; fears Admiral Cochrane, 306; destroyed at Navarino, 331-3

Turks: outdated and inaccurate inherited opinions and prejudices concerning, 52; Western Christians atavistic hatred of, 52; official opinion of the powers, 52; threat to destroy the Parthenon, 242

Turner, John: Journal of a Tour in the Levant, 370

Tyrtaeus, 268

Unemployed European army officers in the Greek Revolution, 28-9, 31

United States, 31, 51, 53, 59-60, 66, 136-7, 140, 181; philhellenic enthusiasm in, 298; large sums collected, 298-9; President Monroe’s declaration, 299; negotiations with both Turkey and Greece, 300-2; sends a naval squadron to Eastern Mediterranean, 300; turns a blind eye to the Bayard (q.v.) scheme to build warships for the Greeks, 301, 308; scandal of the naval contracts, 310-12; leading part taken by U.S. in relief work, 336-47; new appeal committee elected, 338; only food and clothing sent to Greece, and solely for civilian sufferers, 338; eight shiploads of relief supplies sent, 339; endeavours of Howe, Jarvis, and Miller (qq.v.) to check forcible seizure and looting on arrival of consignments, 339-40; Greek orphan children adopted in U.S., 342

United States Government: attitude towards Greek situation, 299; President Monroe’s declaration in favour of the Greeks, 299; Adams (q.v.) opens negotiations with the Turks for commercial treaty, 299-300; Rush (q.v.), flatters the Greeks but refuses diplomatic recognition, 301; Bayard (q.v.) arranges to build Greek warships in U.S., 301; Government continues ambiguous policy, 339 fn.

Urquhart, (Sir) David, 350

Venus de Milo, 288

Verona, Congress at, 128

Vienna, Congress of, 129

Vitales: his letter on French plans for a King of Greece, 265

Voltaire, 20, 198

Voss, Professor, 64

Vostitsa, 95, 96

Voutier, Olivier, French Philhellene: excadet in navy, 288; ADC to Mavrocordato, 288; wounds Raybaud (q.v.) in duel, 288; Mémoires sur la Guerre Actuelle des Grecs, 364, 371, 376, 388; Lettres sur la Grèce, 364

Washington, George, 59, 270, 280, 300

Washington, William Townsend, 387; claims to be a nephew of George

Washington, 280; joins in Roche’s (q.v.) protest, 280; dissipated and dishonest, is disowned by fellow Americans, 280; killed in outbreak of civil violence, 281, 325

Washingtonia, 347

Waterloo, 28, 57, 58, 61, 244, 248, 250, 257, 279

Westminster Review, 220

Whitcombe: would-be assassin of Trelawny (q.v.), 240, 330

Williams, H. W.: Travels in Italy, Greece, etc., 370

Wilson, Rev. Sheridan, 199-201, 202, 203, 229. A Narrative of the Greek Mission, 366, 382, 383, 384

Wilson, Sir Robert, 302

Wintz, Count General de: a mysterious Montenegrin claiming that title and touting dubious schemes for raising Greek loans, 130, 142, 207

Woodhouse, C. M.: The Philhellenes, 378

Woolf, Rev. Joseph, 196, 201

Wright, ’Colonel’, Dublin medical student, 182-3

Württemberg, 67, 72, 74, 102, 120, 153

Zacynthos (Zante), 21

Zambelli, Lega, Byron’s secretary, 166

Zante (renamed Zacynthos), 21, 168, 180, 210, 211, 228, 319

Zeune, Professor, 64, 65

Zürich, 70, 74

Acheter