Version classiqueVersion mobile

What Works in Conservation 2018

 | 
William J. Sutherland
, 
Lynn V. Dicks
, 
Nancy Ockendon
, 
et al.

7. Primate conservation

7.11. Habitat protection

Texte intégral

7.11.1 Habitat protection

Likely to be beneficial

● Create/protect habitat corridors

1One before-and-after study in Belize found that howler monkey numbers increased after the protection of a forest corridor, alongside other interventions. Assessment: likely to be beneficial (effectiveness 65%; certainty 41%; harms 0%).

2https://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​1580

Unknown effectiveness (limited evidence)

● Legally protect primate habitat

3Two reviews and a before-and-after study in China found that primate numbers increased or their killing was halted after their habitat became legally protected, alongside other interventions. However, one before-and-after study in Kenya found that colobus and mangabey numbers decreased despite the area being declared legally protected, alongside other interventions. Two before-and-after studies found that most chimpanzees and gorillas reintroduced to areas that received legal protection, alongside other interventions, survived over 4–5 years. However, one before-and-after study in Brazil found that most golden lion tamarins did not survive over seven years despite being reintroduced to a legally protected area, alongside other interventions, yet produced offspring that partly compensated the mortality. One controlled, site comparison study in Mexico found that howler monkeys in protected areas had lower stress levels than individuals living in unprotected forest fragments. Assessment: unknown effectiveness — limited evidence (effectiveness 60%; certainty 30%; harms 0%).

4https://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​1578

● Establish areas for conservation which are not protected by national or international legislation (e.g. private sector standards and codes)

5Two before-and-after studies in Rwanda, Republic of Congo and Belize found that gorilla and howler monkey numbers increased after the implementation of a conservation project funded by a consortium of organizations or after being protected by local communities, alongside other interventions. Assessment: unknown effectiveness — limited evidence (effectiveness 60%; certainty 10%; harms 0%).

6https://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​1579

● Create/protect forest patches in highly fragmented landscapes

7One before-and-after study in Belize found that howler monkey numbers increased after the protection of forest along property boundaries and across cleared areas, alongside other interventions. Assessment: unknown effectiveness — limited evidence (effectiveness 40%; certainty 10%; harms 0%).

8https://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​1581

No evidence found (no assessment)

9We have captured no evidence for the following interventions:

  • Create buffer zones around protected primate habitat
  • Demarcate and enforce boundaries of protected areas.

7.11.2 Habitat creation or restoration

Unknown effectiveness (limited evidence)

● Plant indigenous trees to re-establish natural tree communities in clear-cut areas

10One site comparison study in Kenya found that group densities of two out of three primate species were lower in planted forests than in natural forests. Assessment: unknown effectiveness — limited evidence (effectiveness 30%; certainty 5%; harms 0%).

11https://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​1584

No evidence found (no assessment)

12We have captured no evidence for the following interventions:

  • Restore habitat corridors
  • Plant indigenous fast-growing trees (will not necessarily resemble original community) in clear-cut areas
  • Use weeding to promote regeneration of indigenous tree communities.

Table des illustrations

URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/6644/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 242k
URL http://books.openedition.org/obp/docannexe/image/6644/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 181k

Lire

Open access

Acheter

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search