Version classiqueVersion mobile

What Works in Conservation 2017

 | 
William J. Sutherland
, 
Lynn V. Dicks
, 
Nancy Ockendon
, 
et al.

6. SOME ASPECTS OF CONTROL OF FRESHWATER INVASIVE SPECIES

6.5 Threat: Invasive reptiles

Texte intégral

6.5.1 Red-eared terrapin Trachemys scripta

Based on the collated evidence, what is the current assessment of the effectiveness of interventions for controlling red-eared terrapin?

Likely to be beneficial

● Direct removal of adults

Unlikely to be beneficial

● Application of a biocide

No evidence found (no assessment)

● Biological control using native predators
● Draining invaded waterbodies
● Public education
● Search and removal using sniffer dogs

Likely to be beneficial

Direct removal of adults

1Two studies, a replicated study from Spain using Aranzadi turtle traps, and an un-replicated study in the British Virgin Islands using sein netting, successfully captured but did not eradicate red-eared terrapin populations. Assessment: likely to be beneficial (effectiveness 40%; certainty 50%).
http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​1055

Unlikely to be beneficial

Application of a biocide

2A replicated, controlled laboratory study in the USA, found that application of glyphosate to the eggs of red-eared terrapins reduced hatching success to 73% but only at the highest experimental concentration of glyphosate and a surface active agent. Assessment: unlikely to be beneficial (effectiveness 15%; certainty 50%).
http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​1059

No evidence found (no assessment)

3We have captured no evidence for the following interventions:

  • Biological control using native predators

  • Draining invaded waterbodies

  • Public education

  • Search and removal using sniffer dogs

Lire

Open access

Acheter

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search