Version classiqueVersion mobile

What Works in Conservation 2017

 | 
William J. Sutherland
, 
Lynn V. Dicks
, 
Nancy Ockendon
, 
et al.

6. SOME ASPECTS OF CONTROL OF FRESHWATER INVASIVE SPECIES

6.4 Threat: Invasive fish

Texte intégral

6.4.1 Brown and black bullheads

Based on the collated evidence, what is the current assessment of the effectiveness of interventions for controlling brown and black bullheads?

Beneficial

● Application of a biocide

Likely to be beneficial

● Netting

No evidence found (no assessment)

● Biological control of beneficial species
● Biological control using native predators
● Changing salinity
● Changing pH
● Draining invaded waterbodies
● Electrofishing
● Habitat manipulation
● Increasing carbon dioxide concentrations
● Public education
● Trapping using sound or pheromonal lures
● Using a combination of netting and electrofishing
● UV radiation

Beneficial

Application of a biocide

1Two studies in the UK and USA found that rotenone successfully eradicated black bullhead. Assessment: beneficial (effectiveness 80%; certainty 80%).
http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​1050

Likely to be beneficial

Netting

2A replicated study in a nature reserve in Belgium found that double fyke nets could be used to significantly reduce the population of large brown bullheads. Assessment: likely to be beneficial (effectiveness 55%; certainty 55%).
http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​1051

No evidence found (no assessment)

3We have captured no evidence for the following interventions:

  • Biological control of beneficial species

  • Biological control using native predators

  • Changing salinity

  • Changing pH

  • Draining invaded waterbodies

  • Electrofishing

  • Habitat manipulation

  • Increasing carbon dioxide concentrations

  • Public education

  • Trapping using sound or pheromonal lures

  • Using a combination of netting and electrofishing

  • UV radiation

6.4.2 Ponto-Caspian gobies

Based on the collated evidence, what is the current assessment of the effectiveness of interventions for controlling Ponto-Caspian gobies?

Beneficial

● Changing salinity

Likely to be beneficial

● Use of barriers to prevent migration

No evidence found (no assessment)

● Application of a biocide
● Biological control of beneficial species
● Biological control using native predators
● Changing pH
● Draining invaded waterbodies
● Electrofishing
● Habitat manipulation
● Increasing carbon dioxide concentrations
● Netting
● Public education
● Trapping using visual, sound and pheromonal lures
● Using a combination of netting and electrofishing
● UV radiation

Beneficial

Changing salinity

4A replicated controlled laboratory study in Canada found 100% mortality of round gobies within 48 hours of exposure to water of 30% salinity. Assessment: beneficial (effectiveness 90%; certainty 75%).
http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​1072

Likely to be beneficial

Use of barriers to prevent migration

5A controlled, replicated field study in the USA found that an electrical barrier prevented movement of round gobies across it, and that increasing electrical pulse duration and voltage increased the effectiveness of the barrier. Assessment: likely to be beneficial (effectiveness 50%; certainty 45%).
http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​1074

No evidence found (no assessment)

6We have captured no evidence for the following interventions:

  • Application of a biocide

  • Biological control of beneficial species

  • Biological control using native predators

  • Changing pH

  • Draining invaded waterbodies

  • Electrofishing

  • Habitat manipulation

  • Increasing carbon dioxide concentrations

  • Netting

  • Public education

  • Trapping using visual, sound and pheromonal lures

  • Using a combination of netting and electrofishing

  • UV radiation

Lire

Open access

Acheter

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search