Version classiqueVersion mobile

What Works in Conservation 2015

 | 
William J. Sutherland
, 
Lynn V. Dicks
, 
Nancy Ockendon
, 
et al.

3. Bird Conservation

3.6. Threat: Transportation and service corridors

Texte intégral

3.6.1 Verges and airports

Based on the collated evidence, what is the current assessment of the effectiveness of interventions for verges and airports?

Likely to be beneficial

● Scare or otherwise deter birds from airports

Unknown effectiveness (limited evidence)

● Mow roadside verges

No evidence found (no assessment)

● Sow roadside verges

Likely to be beneficial

Scare or otherwise deter birds from airports

1Two replicated studies in the UK and USA found that fewer birds used areas of long grass at airports, but no data were provided on the effect of long grass on strike rates or bird mortality. Assessment: likely to be beneficial (effectiveness 50%; certainty 44%; harms 0%).

2http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​261

Unknown effectiveness (limited evidence)

Mow roadside verges

3A single replicated, controlled trial in the USA found that mowed roadside verges were less attractive to ducks as nesting sites, but had higher nesting success after four years. Assessment: unknown effectiveness – limited evidence (effectiveness 30%; certainty 30%; harms 9%).

4http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​259

No evidence found (no assessment)

5We have captured no evidence for the following intervention:

6• Sow roadside verges

3.6.2 Power lines and electricity pylons

Based on the collated evidence, what is the current assessment of the effectiveness of interventions for power lines and electricity pylons?

Beneficial

● Mark power lines

Likely to be beneficial

● Bury or isolate power lines
● Insulate electricity pylons
● Remove earth wires from power lines
● Use perch-deterrents to stop raptors perching on pylons

Unknown effectiveness (limited evidence)

● Thicken earth wires

Unlikely to be beneficial

● Add perches to electricity pylons
● Reduce electrocutions by using plastic, not metal, leg rings to mark birds
● Use raptor models to deter birds from power lines

Beneficial

Mark power lines

7A total of eight studies and two literature reviews from across the world found that marking power lines led to significant reductions in bird collision mortalities. Different markers had different impacts. Assessment: beneficial (effectiveness 81%; certainty 85%; harms 0%).

8http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​265

Likely to be beneficial

Bury or isolate power lines

9A single before-and-after study in Spain found a dramatic increase in juvenile eagle survival following the burial or isolation of dangerous power lines. Assessment: likely to be beneficial (effectiveness 60%; certainty 44%; harms 0%).

10http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​262

Insulate electricity pylons

11A single before-and-after study in the USA found that insulating power pylons significantly reduced the number of Harris’s hawks electrocuted. Assessment: likely to be beneficial (effectiveness 60%; certainty 45%; harms 0%).

12http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​268

Remove earth wires from power lines

13Two before-and-after studies from Norway and the USA describe significant reductions in bird collision mortalities after earth wires were removed from sections of power lines. Assessment: likely to be beneficial (effectiveness 90%; certainty 60%; harms 0%).

14http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​263

Use perch-deterrents to stop raptors perching on pylons

15A single controlled study in the USA found that significantly fewer raptors were found near perch-deterrent lines, compared to controls, but no information on electrocutions was provided. Assessment: likely to be beneficial (effectiveness 50%; certainty 45%; harms 0%).

16http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​269

Unknown effectiveness (limited evidence)

Thicken earth wires

17A single paired sites trial in the USA found no reduction in crane species collision rates in a wire span with an earth wire three times thicker than normal. Assessment: unknown effectiveness – limited evidence (effectiveness 0%; certainty 25%; harms 0%).

18http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​264

Unlikely to be beneficial

Add perches to electricity pylons

19A single before-and-after study in Spain found that adding perches to electricity pylons did not reduce electrocutions of Spanish imperial eagles. Assessment: unlikely to be beneficial (effectiveness 0%; certainty 42%; harms 0%).

20http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​267

Reduce electrocutions by using plastic, not metal, leg rings to mark birds

21A single replicated and controlled study in the USA found no evidence that using plastic leg rings resulted in fewer raptors being electrocuted. Assessment: unlikely to be beneficial (effectiveness 0%; certainty 42%; harms 0%).

22http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​270

Use raptor models to deter birds from power lines

23A single paired sites trial in Spain found that installing raptor models near power lines had no impact on bird collision mortalities. Assessment: unlikely to be beneficial (effectiveness 0%; certainty 43%; harms 0%)

24http://www.conservationevidence.com/​actions/​266

Lire

Open access

Acheter

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search