Version classiqueVersion mobile
OpenEdition Books

Stories from Quechan Oral Literature

 | 
A. M Halpern
, 
Amy Miller

4. Three Stories About Kwayúu

Kwayúu. Púk Atsé

Mary K. Escalanti, Josefa Hartt et Rosita Carr
Traduction de Barbara Levy, George Bryant et Amy Miller

Texte intégral

1Kwayúu (The One Who Sees) is a giant who gets his name from his tremendous size and the view which it affords him. The narratives in this chapter tell about Kwayúu from three radically different perspectives.

Notes and synopsis: Mary Kelly Escalantiʹs story of Kwayúu

2Mary Kelly Escalanti told her story of Kwayúu to Abe Halpern on September 15, 1978. Halpern later reviewed his transcript of the narrative with Barbara Levy.

3This story focuses on two boys whose parents have been eaten by Kwayúu. The boys are raised by their grandmother. Eventually they decide to avenge their parentsʹdeath by killing the giant. Ignoring their grandmotherʹs warnings, they make a difficult journey through the four levels of heaven to where the monster lives among the bones of his victims.

4The journey is made on foot, and one of the boys sings of the pain caused by his shoe. The lines of the song,

‘Ányxámarúy akáamawépetik aléeletíi
alíiláalaláa
alíiláalaláa

5are heard, under comparable circumstances, in Tom Kellyʹs story ‘Aavém Kwasám in Chapter 6.

6When they reach the home of Kwayúu, the boys find that he is blind, and they tease him. Somehow Kwayúu manages to catch them, and he instructs his wife to cook them. The boys use their spiritual powers to summon rain, so that the wife is unable to light a fire. Instead of cooking the boys, she makes shuuvíi (a term which may be translated either as ‘porridge’ or ‘gravy’). When Kwayúu eats it, his insides are cut apart by sharp objects which the boys have placed in the shuuvíi, and he dies.

7The boys watch him die. They sing a song which puts the spirits of his victims to rest, and then they go home and tell the news to their grandmother.

Notes and synopsis: Josefa Harttʹs story of Kwayúu

8Josefa Harttʹs story of Kwayúu has been extracted from a longer narrative which was recorded on February 12, 1981. Halpern reviewed his transcript of the story with Eunice Miguel.

9Josefa Harttʹs story begins with the family of Kwayúu. This family has four sons, the youngest and smallest of whom grows to an extraordinary size and becomes known as Kwayúu.

10Kwayúu kills and eats people. His older brother, living at the bottom of the ocean, finds out what is happening. He goes to Kwayúu and orders him to stop. Kwayúu hears him, but he is blind, so he cannot see who is speaking, and he pays no attention. Relatives warn him that someone is coming for him, but he ignores the warnings and just lies there.

11The brother tries to drag Kwayúu into the water. This is difficult, because Kwayúu is so big. Finally, Kwayúu grows wings and tries to escape by flying. When he beats his wings, the wings leave an imprint in the wet ground which may still be seen today. He struggles, walks, and sits down, and the imprint left by his buttocks may likewise be seen today.

12Eventually the brother succeeds in pulling Kwayúu into the water. When Kwayúu is finally dead, someone pulls his wing feathers into the shape of a teepee.

13The Creator, who has been watching, denounces both Kwayúu and the brother who killed him. Dark clouds gather. The brother uses lightning to destroy himself and everything around him.

Notes and synopsis: Rosita Carrʹs story Púk Atsé

14Rosita Carr told the story Puk Atsé to Abe Halpern on February 1, 1978. Halpern later reviewed his transcript of the story with Mina Hills.

15This story begins with a murder. Púk Atséʹs daughter is killed by strangers. Her body is found by Roadrunner, who hurries to the womanʹs home to notify her family. The people there do not understand Roadrunnerʹs language, and one interpreter after another fails to decipher his message. (This passage is very funny: the storyteller laughs, her audience laughs, and everyone who listens to the recording laughs as well.) Finally Púk Atsé himself appears. He is able to understand Roadrunner, and he learns that his daughter is dead.

16The daughterʹs body is brought home, and the people from Púk Atséʹs household avenge her death by killing the enemy.

17A young woman from the enemy camp survives and is taken home by Púk Atsé. A baby and an old woman also survive. The baby becomes the main character of the story. Even as an infant, he has extraordinary spiritual powers. Púk Atséʹs colleagues try to shoot him, burn him, and drown him in the rain, but his powers protect him, and their attempts fail. Finally he is left to starve — and of course this fails as well. Although he is still a baby, he manages to heal the old woman, who has been shot with an arrow, and she takes care of him. He hunts and provides food for them both.

18The baby grows into a boy and has a series of adventures. He manages to escape from Old Lady Flesh-Ripper, from a monster called Iiyáam Kwakáap, who swallows him, and from Eagle, who tries to feed him to her chicks. Eventually he sets off to find and kill the giant Kwayúu. This time, he is not so lucky: Kwayúu catches him and takes him beyond the four levels of heaven. When Kwayúuʹs four wives try to roast him, he summons rain to extinguish their cooking fire. He adds sharp rocks to the meal which the wives are preparing. Kwayúu gulps his food, and the sharp rocks cut his throat. Once Kwayúu is dead, the boy brings the four wives down to the first level of heaven. He turns himself into an arrow and returns to his home to visit the old woman who raised him.

19The boy remains at home and grows up. Eventually he turns himself into a newly hatched dove and begins another adventure. He is recognized and caught. He is taken to an old man (who might be Púk Atsé), but he manages to escape, and there the story ends.

Comparative note

20A monster known as Kwayúu is also found in Mojave literature. According to Kroeber (1948:48), his name “means a meteor or fireball, usually conceived of as a monster or man-eater.” His four wives are the daughters of the sun (Kroeber 1948:12).

Kwayúu

21Told by Mary Kelly Escalanti

22Xuumáarəts vuunóok,
xavík vuunóok,
'aankóoyəts viivám.
Namáawk a'ím.

23Viivám,
nyáava,
nyáavəts xatáləm,
ayóovək vanyuunóok.
Maawíik.

24Antáy nyáany,
nyakónya,
giant nyáanyts,
asóo—
amáa—
asóok nyiitsáavək a'ét.
Pa'iipáa,
pa'iipáa avawétk vuunóotk.
'Amáyvi alythík,
avawétk vuunóot.

25Vanyuunóok,
kaathóm ta' axánək,
Kwayúu a'ím amúlyk viithíkəm,
a'éməm.

26“'Aaly'étk vany'uunóok.
'Awétstanək 'ayóov.
'Ayóov
'attapóoytxa!”
a'ét.

27Tapúyúm a'ím.

28'Aakóoyənyts vanyaavák a'ím,
“Makaváarək!
Matsaváamúm.
Pa'iipáa nyiikwanáaməts nyaathúuva.
Matsaváam.
Matapúy a'ím.”

29'Awítsxa.
'Ayóovxa.”

30“'Amáyvi athík viithíkəm,
matsaváam alyma'émúm.
Mapóoyúm!”

31A'áv alya'ém.
“'Awétsk 'ayóovxa,”
nyaa'étka.

32Iiwáa vathíly tsaváw,
viiwétsk.
'Amáyvi nathómk,
viiwétsəm.
Nyiináamts athótk,
nyaayúu tsáaməly,
'axótt alya'éməm,
viiwéts.
Uuv'áak viiwéts.

33'Akórəm,
'amáy athík aatsuumpápəm,
a'éta.
Xalyavíim.

34Tsuumpápəm,
nakayáamək viiwétsk.
Viiwétsk uuv'óok;
nyaapóoyk uuv'óok.

35Viiwétsk viiwétsəm;
nyiináam,
nyaayúu tsáaməly aspér tanəm nyamnayémək.
Matxáts amíim.
Kaawíts stones awíim,
tsakyévək vaawíim,
nyiitsamíim,
nyamuupúuvt.
Kaawíts awíim,
nyamuupúuv vanyaawéts,
tsuumpáp.

36Makyí nyaawéts,
nyáanyi,
iiményts arávta,
uuv'áak vuuwétsəny.
Iiményts aráv.

37'Ashénta,
nyaxmanyéwəts,
xamanyéwəts arávəm,
amíim siivám.

“'Ányxámarúy akáamawépetik aléeletíi?
Alíiláalaláa alíiláalaláa,”

38a'étk siivá.

39A'íim,
siivá.
Kaa'émək a'íim:
“Xamanyéw avány,
kamawéməm?
Arávək!” a'ím,
“Íim,” a'ím,
amíim siivát.

40A'íim,
siivák,
amíim suunóo.
Nyaaxóttəm,
viiwétst.

41Viiwétsk viiwétsk viiwéts,
nyamáam,
nyaakatánəmək,
ayóovək vuunóo.

42Kwayúunyts sanyaathík,
siivák.
Tasínymək,
'atsayúu alya'émk,
siivák athúum.

43Vanyaavák.
Xuumáarənyts katánmək vuunóony;
'avány nakwíinək ayóovək vuunóo.

44Nyamuuéevtək vuunóo.

45Iisháalyva —
tasínymək,
iisháaly vaawéemtiyum.
Atháw,
nyiishtúu a'étk vaawétk awím.

46Tsakaváarəs.
Tsakavár apóoy a'étk nakwíinək vuunóo.

47Vuunóom,
suunóonykəm,
kaawémək vanyaavák,
nyiishtót!
Xuuvíkəly!
Nyiishtúum.

48Nyiishtúum siitháwəm;
“Móo.”

49Nyaavéets,
viivák,
nyáanyts.

50“Móo,
'aakóoy!
'Aakóoyey!
Kayúuk kakawéməm,
'amáawú!”
a'ét.

51“Áa-á,
'awéxá,”
a'ím.

52Tashkyénəts viivám,
nyáany alytsáam.
Alyúly a'íim uunóo.

53Uunóom,
xuumáarənyts viitháwəny.
Xuumáarəva,
shatuumáts nyiikwanáam,
viitháwk athúm.

54“'Awíim 'a'ávxa,”
a'íim viitháwk awím,
uuv'áw a'érək.
Uuv'áwk,
a'érəm.

55'Amátənyts 'axáyk,
'a'íinyts 'axáykəm,
taráalya'ém nyiikwév.
Apóm alya'ém.

56***

57Athúum,
viitháw.
Viitháwm,
awétəntim,
athúnti alya'ém;
taráa alya'ém.

58Vuunóonyk,
nyaatsaváamək,
nyaa,
'aakóoyənyts uukanáav alya'éməxayk,
nyaayúu kwanymé awét.

59Shuuvíik,
a'éta.
Shuuvíik.

60Pa'iipáa uu'ítsapatənyts:
shuuvíik a'étəm.
Awíim vuunóok.

61Kwara'ákənya,
shamathíi kuu'éyk,
ayúulya'émkəm.

62“Móo,
nyaamaavíirkəm?”
“Áa,
'aavíirək.
Mamáxa,” a'ím.

63Xuumáarənyts a'áavək ayóovək avatháw,
vuunóok awím.

64Nyaatápəm,
'apílyk iináaməm,
aví tsaváwəm.
Kwayúunyts aváak awím,
atháwk,

65***

66amáam.

67“'Apílyk,” a'ét.
“'Apílyk.
'Anóqəm'apílyk,” a'ét.

68Xuumáarənyts
kaawíts,
mattnamíilək uuváak,
kaawíts 'asháak athóoyvtanəm alytsamíim.
Tsuumpápk viitháw.
Awím.

69Axúupxayəm,
vathíly vaawé awét,
maxákəly.
Aakyéttk,
vaawé.
“'Apílyk!” a'ét.

70“'Ook,
'apílypaa!”
a'étk,
kanáavək siivát.

71Yeah,
a'étk,
viivám,
nyaa'ávkəm —
viitháwk,
aviitháwk a'ávtanək.

72Nyaawíntim,
nyaawíntim,
'anóqəm vaa'ée a'é ta'axánəm a'áv.
“Xwóott!
'Uupílyəny!”
a'ét.

73Viitháwk,
viitháwk,
nyaawíntim,
“'Apíly ta'axánək,”
a'étk;
viivá.

74Tsapéetanəm.
“Áaaa!”
a'ét,
nyamáam,
aakyítt achémtəm,
maxákəly.
Nyaawíim,
viivák.

75Nyaawíntik,
nyamáam,
nyaaxúupəntim,
nyamáam,
nyuupáyəm;
axúp vaawée.

76'Uupílyəny matt-tsapéek.

77Avíly aakyéttkəm áam.
Vaa'é.
Apúy.

78A'étəm,
nyiiyóovək.
Viitháwk,
'atsakavártanək viitháw.

79“Móo.”
'Aakóoyənyts ayúuk suuváa.
“Móo,” nyaa'íim.
Nyaapúyəm ayóovək.
Uuv'óok vuunóok.

80Nyaayúu tsáaməly ayóovək vuunóony.

81Pa'iipáa nyatsasháakənyts,
tsáam vathá lyavíik,
nyáany lyavíik,
kaawítsənyts,
matt-tsapéetan.

82Ayóovək vuunóok vuunóok,
nyuuv'óok.

83Nyuuv'óok a'ím,
aashtuuvárət:

“Eemévəts,
iisháaly,
akwetsəts awétsəts,
awék oonóonóon,
awék oonóonóo.
Awék oonóonóon,
awék oonóonóo.
Eemévəts,
iisháaly,
akwétsəts awétsəts,
awék oonóonóon,
awék,”

84a'étk suunóok.

85Aanáaly a'ím —
iisháalya,
iimé vatháts,
iisháalyəva,
alykwatháw tsuuétsəts —
nyaa'ím.

86Íim,
kanáavka,
aashtuuvár.

87Nyaayúu tsáaməly,
nyáanyts athótkəm viitháwəsh.
Íim aashtuuvárək.

88Amíim siiv'áwk a'íikəta.

89“Móo
vany'uunóok,
'ayóovkəm áam,
'atatapóoyt.
'Ankavék.”

90'Aakóoyəny —
namáawk a'étəma —
nyáanya,
ayóovək
uukanáav a'ím.

91'Avíi natsén a'ím viinathíis,
matt-tsapéek,
nuutsénəxany,
'uukórəny matt-tsapéem,
vanyuuv'óok.
“Ka'thútsk 'ankavék av'úuv'óok 'athómúm,”
nyaa'íima.

92Uuv'óok uuv'óok,
awím,
arrow mattatséwk.
Arrow.
'Iipá.

93***

94'Iipá
'iipá mattatséwk,
nyáanya.
Natsénək vinathíik,
shóx a'étk,
'avuumák uuv'óok.

95Ayúum.
Xatalwéts avuuváak;
Xatalwé uu'ítsəny,
'uuláayəny!
Nyaayúu tsáaməly athúu a'étum!
Ayúum uuváak,
nyáanyts,
'aakóoyəny vasháwk a'étk;
vuuváak.

96'Aláaytanəm ayóov.
'Aláayəm nyaayóov,
“Xwóott,” a'ím,
vathí uuv'óok,
matsats'íim uuv'óok
ayóov.

97Uuv'óok awím,
uupúuv.

98***
Xatalwényts,
'atsaráv kamúly a'étk viithík.

99“Ka'thóməly,” aaly'étk uuváam,
ayóovək.

100“Móo,
'atatapóoyta.
'Akatánk.”

101“Makyí makwíivəm,
nyiirísh a'íika 'aaly'íim,
'amétk 'avát,”
'aakóoyənyts a'íim.

102“'Attapóoyvək nya'thúuva,”
a'íim nyuuv'óok.

103A'étəm,
'a'ávək,
nyáamáamta.

Translation

104There were children,
there two of them there,
and there was a little old lady.
They called her Grandmother, they say.

105There she was,
and these (children),
these (children) were orphans,
and (someone) was watching them.
She was a relative.

106That mother of theirs,
and their father,
that giant
had eaten—
had eaten—
he had eaten them up, they say.
People,
he had been doing that to people.
He was up in a high place,
and he had been doing that.

107He was around here,
he really was doing whatever it was,
and he was named Kwayúu,
they might have said.

108“I’ve been thinking.
We will go and take a look.
We will watch him
and we will kill him!”
(one of boys) said.

109He was going to kill him, they say.

110The old woman was sitting here, and she said,
“You are mistaken!
You won’t be able to do it.
He is a dangerous person.
You can’t do it.
He is going to kill you.”

111“We will do it.
We will take a look.”

112“He is up in a high place,
and there’s not a chance you’ll able to do it.
You are going to die!”

113They didn’t listen.
“We’ll go and take a look,”
they said.

114They set their hearts on it,
and they went.
They headed towards the high place,
and they went.
It was dangerous,
everything (was),
it wasn’t good,
(but) they went.
They went walking.

115Long ago,
there were four levels of heaven,
they say.
There might have been.

116There were four of them,
and (the boys) went heading straight toward them.
They went along and they stopped;
when they were exhausted, they stopped.

117They went and went;
it was dangerous,
they went through all (kinds of) very powerful things.
The wind howled.
He had used some kind of stones,
he had put them together like this,
and put them down there,
and (the boys) went through that.
He had done something (else),
and they went through that and went on,
(through) four (levels).

118Somewhere, as they went along,
at that (point),
their feet hurt,
because of (all) their walking.
Their feet hurt.

119One of them,
his shoe,
the shoe hurt him,
and he sat there crying.

“My shoe, what have you done to it?
Fire is burning, fire is burning,”

120he went on saying.

121So,
there he was.
He said something:
“That shoe,
what did you do to it?
It hurts!” he said,
“It’s all over,” he said,
and he sat there crying.

122So,
there he was,
and he was crying.
When it was better,
they went on.

123They went and went and went,
and finally,
they got there,
and they watched for him.

124Kwayúu was over there,
there he was.
He was blind,
he couldn’t see anything,
and there he was.

125There he was.
The children got there, and there they were;
they went around the house looking.

126They played tricks on him.

127This arm of his —
he was blind,
and he waved his arm around like this.
He (wanted to) get them,
and he tried to catch them, like this.

128They laughed.
They went around laughing fit to die.

129There they were,
and he was around there,
he was doing something,
and he caught them!
Both of them!
He caught them.

130He caught them and there they were;
“Well, now,” (he said).

131His wife,
here she was,
that one.

132“Well, now,
old woman!
Old woman!
Go and do something
so that I may eat!”
he said.

133“Yes,
I will do it,”
she said.

134There was a pot there,
and she put those (boys) in it.
She was getting ready to cook them.

135She went on,
and the children were here.
These children,
(they had) powerful dreams,
there they were.

136“I will try to do it,”
they were saying, and so,
they used their power to make it rain.
It rained,
(because) they used their power.

137The earth got wet,
and the wood got wet,
and she couldn’t get it to burn at all.
It wouldn’t burn.

138***

139So,
here they were.
Here they were,
and she did it again,
and once again it didn’t happen;
she couldn’t get it to burn.

140She went on,
and when she found it impossible,
well,
the old woman didn’t tell him,
she did something else (instead).

141She made gravy,
they say.
She made gravy.

142That’s what people say:
she made gravy, they say.
She went about doing it.

143As for the old man,
he didn’t know, poor thing,
because he couldn’t see.

144“Well, now,
have you finished?”
“Yes,
I’m finished.
You may eat,” she said.

145The children were watching and listening.
there they were.

146She put (the food) down,
and it was very hot,
and she put it there.
Kwayúu got there, and so,
he took it,

147***

148and he ate it.

149“It’s hot,” he said.
“It’s hot.
It’s a little bit hot,” he said.

150The children
(had done) something,
they had used their powers,
and they had put some kind of very sharp bones in it.
There were four (bones).
They had done it.

151He slurped it down, and all of a sudden,
it went like this, right in here,
inside him.
It cut him,
like this.
“It’s hot!” he said.

152“Ooh,
it’s so hot!”
he said,
and he sat there telling her about it.

153Yeah,
and so,
here he was,
and when they heard him —
here they were,
they were right there and they heard him.

154When he did it again,
when he did it again,
he really did go like this a little, and they heard him.
“Oh, my!
How hot it is!”
he said.

155There they were,
there they were,
and when he did it again,
“It’s really hot,”
he said;
here he was.

156It was overwhelming.
“Ahhhh!”
he said,
and that’s all;
it had almost cut right through him,
(from) the inside.
Then,
here he was.

157He did it again,
and that’s all,
when he slurped it up again,
that’s all,
it was all gone;
he had slurped it up, like this.

158It was overwhelmingly hot.

159It had cut through, here (inside him).
He went like this.
And he died.

160So,
they were watching.
Here they were,
and they were really laughing.

161“Well, now.”
The old woman was watching, over there.
“Well, now,” she said.
They watched him die.
They were standing there.

162All the things were watching.

163People’s bones,
all of them were like this,
they were like that,
whatever (they were),
there were a whole lot of them.

164They were watching, on and on,
they stood there.

165They stood there, and so,
they sang:

“This foot of his,
his hand,
they did it, they did it,
they were doing it,
they were doing it.
They were doing it,
they were doing it,
This foot of his,
his hand,
they did it, they did it,
they were doing it,
they did it,”

166they were saying it.

167They moved aside —
a hand,
this foot,
this hand,
these bones that were there —
(that’s what) it says.

168It came to an end,
and they told about it,
they sang about it.

169All those things,
those (things) were there.
It came to an end and they sang.

170(The boys) stood there crying, they say.

171“Okay,
here we are,
we have seen him,
and we have killed him.
We’re going back.”

172The old woman —
they called her their grandmother, they say —
that one,
they were going to see her
and tell her about it.

173They came this way, intending to go down the mountain, but
it was overwhelming,
the way they were to come down,
the distance was overwhelming,
and they stood there.
“I wonder how we might get back,”
they said.

174They stood there and stood there,
and so,
they turned themselves into arrows.
Arrows.
Arrows.

175***

176Arrows,
they turned themselves into arrows,
those (boys).
They came down,
swiftly,
and they stood behind the house.

177He was watching them.
Coyote was there;
the one they call Coyote,
how bad he was!
He always wanted to do everything!
He was watching them,
he was the one,
he was supposed to be taking care of the old woman;
here he was.

178They saw that he was bad.
When they saw that he was bad,
“Oh, my,” they said,
and they stood here,
they stood there crying,
and they watched.

179They stood there, and so,
they went in.

180***

181That Coyote,
he was lying there pretending to be sick.

182“What shall I do?” he was wondering,
and they looked at him.

183“Okay,
we’ve killed him.
We have returned,” they said.

184“Somehow you left (home),
and I thought you were gone (for good),
and I cried,”
the old woman said.

185“We killed him,”
they stood there saying it.

186They said it,
and I heard it,
and that’s all.

Kwayúu

187Told by Josefa Hartt

188Nyáava,
'iipáats,
sanya'ákəm xavík nyiitháwk viitháwk,
awím,
nyáava,
xuuméey 'iipátsanyts tsuumpápk a'étəma.

189Tsuumpápk,
tsuumpápk viitháwəm.

190Viitháwəm,
a'ím,
ashíitk.
“Máanyts,
ma'xóttk,
mav'áak,
nyaayúu mathúum.
Maxalykwáaxa,”
a'íim.

191Nya'íim,

192***

193nyiivántim,
a'ím,
“Máanyts,
vanyaamayáak,
xaasa'íly tó ta'axán,
maxákəly manyváyk.
Nyaayúu 'ats'iipáyəts alyuuváak,
viikwuuváa vathány.
Mayúuk mavasháwk viimathíkxa,”
a'íik a'étəntima.

194A'íim,
áaytəntik a'étəma.

195Nyiiáaytsəntim,
uuváaxayəm,
xeekónyts nyaa'íim,
family,
'ashéntts alyvák 'aláayum.
A'épəm 'a'ávənyk.
Nya'étəm 'a'áva,
Nyáany kanáavtəntik a'éta.

196“Avathóxa.
Kaawémək,
'axótt tánək viithík alya'éməxa.
Alyvák matt-ta'aaláayum.
Alyvák 'atsathúts 'aláayum.
Athóxa.”
A'íntik.

197“Athúum,
nyáany mayúuk;
mavasháwxa,”
a'íim.
A'étəntik;
nyiikuunáavəts athúum,
nyáava ayúuk viitháwəm.

198Tapáar tanəts,
'anóq tanəts,
viivák,
viivátk.
Nyáavəts amák athíi tanək,
vanyaavák.

199Saathúu a'étkəm a'ávək athúum.

200Iimáattənyts 'axótt-təm,
nyaathúum,
kaa'íts athúum,
vanyaathíkəm.

201Athúum:
vatáyk,
'améek,
viiyáanyk viiyáaptəm —
'ayúunyk —
nyáanyi avathótk,
viiyáanyk
viiyáanyk.

202Mattnyiitspéetk,
alyméetanək;
nyáanyənyts,
xeykóts nyáanyts
giant a'ím a'ítya.

203Nyáanyts avathótk a'étəma.
Avathótəm.
Nyáanya,
'Anykwatsáanənyts nyáany 'ashék;
Kwayúu 'a'étəma.

204Vatáyk nyiináamk,
nyaayúu tsáamk ayúuk a'íikəm a'ím,
Kwayúu a'étk,
ashét.

205Təm
vuuváatk;
nya'kútsk,
'atsnyaashuupáwk vanyuuváak,
nyáava.

206Ava'áak vaa'é a'étk viithíitk,
makyí av'áw 'atsayúutk,
avathótk,
ava'áak;
“Vaathóxa,” a'ét
makyí av'áwk 'atsayúutk,
avathótk;
“Vathík,” a'étk,
“Vathík, a'étk
“Vaathótk uuváat.”
Nyuuváavəly,
pa'iipáats siitháwəm,
nyáanya,
atháwk
asóotk a'étəma!

207Asóotk uuváatk,
uuváaxáyk,
nyiithíkəm,
viiyáaxáyk.
Kwanymé awét!

208Avathíkəm,
viiyáaxáyk,
kwanymé awétk!
Athótk vaa'étk uuváat.

209Uuváatəm,
nyáavəts awíim.
Pa'iipáavəts vanyaatháwk,
mattáar alya'émək,
nyáava,
they fight against one another,
a'íim,
athótkəm a'íiny a'étəntima.
Athúum athúuk a'étəma.

210Nyaathúum,
vanyuuváak.

211***

212Nyáavəts,
xavík aváts,
xaasa'íly tóly kwathík,
nyáava ayúu lya'émtəm áam.
Viithíik.

213Nyiinyaav'áwəntim,
nyiiv'áwk viiv'áwəm ayúut.

214Nyaayúuk a'ím,
“Ma'uuláayəny!
Mattmatspéetanək ammuuváantəsh!
Máany nyayúum!
Mata'aaláaytánək mayáam!

215“'Ayúuk va'athík 'athútya.
Av'athíktəsáa,
makyík mathúntik ammuuváa alyma'éməxa!”

216A'étk.
Pa'iipáa tsaqwérək vuunóom,
a'ávtəsáa,
makyíts ayúu lya'émətək;
láwaláw a'ím,
vaa'íim,
vathí ayúuk,
vathí ayúuk,
uuváanyk uuváany.

217Nyiinyaakwévəm,
takavéktək,
viiyémək,
aváam.

218Suuváatk,
suuváatənyk,
“'Ayáantik,
'a'ávxa,” nyaaly'íim,
nyáany,
nyáavəm vanyaathíintik.

219Nyaaváantik,
pa'iipáa nyaatháwtəntim,
ayúutk avathíkəny.

220Ayúutk viithíknyək,
a'íim,
“Ma'uuláayənyts nyiináamtanəm!
Muuváatəsáa,
makyík ma'iipáyk ammawínti alyma'éməxa!”

221A'étk,
vuunóom,
a'ávək;
vaa'íim,
ayúuny,
nyiirísh a'ét.
'Axály athíktək,
kwa'ítsəny,
ayúulya'ém;
nyiikwévəm.

222Vanyuuváak,
siiyémtək;
siithík,
siithíkxayəm,
pa'iipáa —
maawíinyts,
antáy nyakó nyáanyts siitháw.
Aváamxayk —
nyaaváamək,
awéməly ashmátk.
Apátk,
xaavíly xiipántəkəm,
iimény 'axály tsanák,
apátk viithík.

223Ashmátk viithík.

224Ayóovk avatháwnyək,
a'íim,
“'Eey!
Kamánəm!
Pa'iipáats mathíik avathíi'əsh!”
a'ét.

225“Kamánək!” a'étk,
shamán vuunóonyk.
“Kaawíts makyím athíikpəm,
ma'íim,”
a'ét,
takavék apátk.

226Ayúutk,
“Avathíim,
nya'íiva!
Kamánk!” a'étk vuunóony.
Makyík a'ávəny.

227Nyáava,
antsénvəts,
nyamáam,
nyaayáak a'íim,
nyaayúu,
kaawíts,
'axá xamóoləm a'ím,
xeykóts a'étəm,
'a'ávəny.
Xányts xamóolpəm 'ayúunyk.

228Nyáany iithóm tapéttk a'étəma.

229Iithóm nyaatapéttk,
'axány kavkyéwk,
xaavíly avány kavkyéwk,
viiyáatk athúuk a'ét.

230Viiyáatk,
viiyáat.

231Viiyáatəm,
“Kaawíts avathíik!”
a'íim,
“'Ashuupáwəsh,” a'étk,
“Avathíik!
Kamánək!” a'íim.
“Kamánək!” a'íim;
shamán vuunóo,
nyiikwév.

232Amánək,
ayúuk,
nyaayúuny,
kaly'aaxwáayəny,
'axály atápk vaawétk awét.
“Kaawíts makyém athíikpa,
ma'ím,
nyiiríish a'ím viitháwk athópəka.”

233“Athúum,
nya'íiva!” a'íim,
uukanáavək vuunóony,
nyiikwévəm.

234Apátk alyaskyíitk.

235Nyaathíkəm,
nyáanyi,
kaawémək —
makyém 'athíik 'athúm,
nyiinyatséwk,
nyiinyaapáx.

236Nyáanya,
vathány,
nyáanya,
Nyi'anykwatséwənyts,
ayóov alya'éməts
kaly'aaxwáayəny.

237Nyaata'úlyk,
'avíiny uushák,
vaawé nyaawíim,
vaawíim.
Xaavíly atséwk,
alytsatsénm athúuk a' étəma,
xaasa'ílya.

238“Vathány,
xaavílyəny,
Kwaxwétt-ts a'íim,
maapa'iipáany nyam'axóttk,”
nyaa'ím,
nyuuváa.

239“Nyiimuuváat,
'axá maa'úurək.

240“A'íim,
nyiinyaauupáxts athótəm athúum.

241“Kaawíts makyém athíik,
avathúwúm,”
nyaa'ét,
takavék apátk a'étəma.
“Nyáany avathúuk,
avathúu kwa'átstəsáa.”

242“Kaawíts kamathúum muuváam?
Nyáany athótəm,
'ayúutəm,
nyaayúunyts 'axótt alya'ém tan,”
nyaa'íim,
a'ávəx áar alya'émək;
apátk ashmátk;
nyiikwév,
atháwatanəm,
ashmát.

243Ashmátk athótk,
viithíkəm.

244“Avathíik,
nyaaxiipánəm,
nya'íiva!”

245A'íim,
shamánək vuunóony,
nyiikwévtək,
ashmáam viithíkəm.

246Nyamkwatsuumpáp,
nyamaváamək,
iimé taxpályk,
xály kavathúuntək a'étəma.

247Vathúunək,
lólələləl awétk.
Vuuthíit.
Vuuthíixaym,
'axányts aráawəm ám,
uukavék.
Vuuthíinyk,
vuuthíiny.

248Vuuthíim,
“Matsaváam mathúum.
Mawíim,
matt'atspéenypatk'athútya,”
a'ét.

249“'Ashuumáany nyi'náam.
Nyi'anymuukáamxats athúulya'éməxa,”
a'étəm.

250“Kaváarxa.
Mamánənti 'a'ím 'a'íim 'awíi aly'a'émək,
'awé'əsh,”
a'étapatk,
vuuthíit.

251Vanyuuthíim,
nyáanyi,
kam'úly.
Iiwáam alynyiinyaathúutsk,
malyaxúuyk.
***
uunóok aavíirək.
Nyaayúu,
athúm,
ayérək atspámxalyk a'étk,
alynyiinyaathúuts.

252Nyáavi nyaathík,
nyáavi malyxóny vaawíim,
vaa'íim.
Vaawé a'íim,
nyáanyəm.

253'Amáttəny,
viikwaváts vatháts,
'axáyxayíi,
amányk kaathómtəm awétk awím,
nyáanyəm —
malyxóny vaawé nyaa'íim,
nyáanyts
nyiitháawtək a'étəma.

254*** *** ***

255Nyáany awíim,
malyxóny vaawé nyaa'íim,
alyaskyíik nyiitháawtək a'étəma.

256Alyaskyíik,
'avíinyi vaa'étk
athótəm.

257Athótk,
nyiitháawtəm.

258***

259Viithíitəntik,
makyí atspám a'ély,
kaa'íim,
'axányts vaa'íim,
athúum,
nyiisáttk,
'axáyxayətəm,
nyáava,
mattmanyúuvtanək vanyuuváak,
amánək.

260Athúum,
kaathómək vanyaayáak,
nyiinák,
nyaathúum.

261Nyáanyi nyiinákəm,
awíim,
thúutt a'íim,
uunaxwílyk,
xály nyaa-áaptəntim.

262Nyáanyts alyarúvk aly'avíik,
alyaskyíitəntik a'étəma.

263Alyaskyíitəntim,
nyáany,
Kwayúu Iiwéy Atáp a'íim,
ashém athúuk a'étəma.
Ám,
athúum,
nyiitháawəm,
mayúuk;
pa'iipáats 'axáyəm nyiinák athúuk kwalyavíitk a'étəntima.

264Athótəm,
atháwk,
vuuthíinyk,
vuuthíinyk,
viiwáamk,
viiwáamk,
viiwáam.

265Viiwáamk,
xaasa'íly nyáasi nyaakamémək.

266Nyamnyaapúyəm.

267Malyxó nyáanyts vatátsk iináam.
Nyáavəts ashtúum,
uutsamóq vuunóok,
nyaavíirək.

268Nyaayúu atséwk a'étəma —
kaathúts?
Kaawíts
teepee a'étəntik,
'a'ávənyk —
nyáany uutsáawk,
vaawíny,
tasháttk vuunóonyk aavíirək,
alyathík viithík.

269Pa'iipáa Nyi'anykwatséwənyts ayúuk vanyaavák a'ím,
ayúulya'éməs a'étka.

270“Ma'uutsaláaytsəny!
Malyuuvév mathútya!
Máany,
muuwéxats,
'atsmatuupúyxənyts,
matapúyəm 'a'íi ly'a'ém!

271“Mawétk mawítya.
Nyaamawíim,
maaxuuvíkəly,
matsláaytsək mathótk mathúum,
makyík 'amátt vathí muunóo alyma'éməxa!”

272Nyaa'íim,
nyaayúuk
nyáany.
'Akwé vatháts matt-tsapéek,
nyíily tan,
nyiináaaam a'ím.

273Athúm,
nyiiyúutk viithíkəm,
nyaayúu.

274Uuráv aványa,
nyaayúu atséwk,
nyáanyəm aaqwéttk,
'axányily vaawíi vuunóok,
nyaayúu tsáam ta'aaláayk.
Nyáasi tapúytapatk a'étəma.

275Apatəm,
nyamáam,
nyáanyi íimtəm,
tək athúuk a'étəma.

276Athótəm,
nyáava vaathúum,
vuuwíts nyáava.
Pa'iipáavəts —
nyiikwatháawk,
ayúuk vanyaatháwk,
nyáavi tsaamánək,
mattaashuuqwéttk,
mattnyiáar alya'ém,
matt-tapúytək awíik a'étəma.
Shiitamúuly mattáar alya'émk;
kwanyméts siivám,
mattáar alya'ém.

277A'étk,
nyiixwáaytək,
nyáava athúu va'áarək athúuk a'étəma.

278Athúum,
a'íim,
nyáava vaa'íim.
Kanáavtəma.
Kanáavək vuuthíitəma.

Translation

279This one,
a man,
he was with his wife and here they were,
and so,
as for these (people),
they had four sons, they say.

280There were four of them,
there were four of them here.

281Here they were,
and so,
and he called them by name.
“You,
you will be good,
you will travel,
and you will do things.
You will hunt,”
he said.

282Then,

283***

284another one was there,
and he said to him,
“You,
you will go along,
and at the very center of the ocean
you will live at the bottom.
There is a creature or something in there,
this one that is there.
You will watch him and take care of him,”
he said, they say.

285So,
he gave (the third son a task) too, they say.

286He gave them (their tasks),
and there they were, and all of a sudden —
when white people say it,
(in) a family,
one (family member) among them might be bad.
I’ve heard them mention this.
I’ve heard them say it.
They talk about that too, they say.

287“It will happen.
Whatever he does,
it won’t be very good.
He is in (the family) and he might go bad.
He is in (the family) and what he does might be bad.
It will happen.”
They say (that) too.

288“So,
that’s what you (should) look out for;
you must be careful,”
he said.
He said it again;
that’s what he told them about,
(so that) they would keep an eye on this one.

289The very last one,
the very small one,
here he was,
here he was.
This one came after (the others),
and here he was.

290They understood that he was like that.

291His body was fine,
and then,
something happened,
and here he was.

292It happened:
he became big,
he became tall,
he went on and on (growing) —
I’ve seen this before —
it happened there,
he went on
and on.

293He was overwhelming,
he was really tall;
those (people),
those white people call them giants, they say.

294That’s what happened, they say.
It happened.
That (person),
we Quechans named him;
we called him Kwayúu (The One Who Sees).

295He was extraordinarily big,
and he could see everything, they say,
(so) they called him Kwayúu,
they named him (that).

296And
here he was;
he got older,
and he understood things,
this one.

297He came walking this way like this,
and he stood somewhere and looked around,
he did that,
he walked;
“This is how it will be,” he said,
and he stopped somewhere and looked around,
he did that;
“Here,” he said,
“Here,” he said,
“This is how things are.”
He was around there,
and there were people over there,
and as for that one,
(Kwayúu) caught him,
and he ate him, they say!

298He went about eating him,
he was still here, when suddenly,
(someone else) was there,
and (Kwayúu) went after him.
He did it to another one!

299(Someone else) was there,
and (Kwayúu) went along,
and he did it to another one!
He kept doing this.

300There he was,
he was the one who was doing it.
These people were there,
they didn’t like each other,
these (people),
they fought against one another,
they say,
it happened, they say.
That’s how it was, they say.

301Then,
he was around there.

302***

303This one,
this brother of his,
the one that was in the middle of the ocean,
he couldn’t see this (bad brother) at all.
And (the bad one) came.

304He was standing there,
and (his brother) saw him standing there.

305When he saw him, he said,
“How bad you are!
You are going too far with it!
I see you!
You go along destroying things!

306“I am here watching.
(As long as) I am here,
you’ll never act this way again!”

307He said it.
Someone was speaking,
and (Kwayúu) heard it, but
he never saw anyone;
he turned his head from side to side,
he went like this,
he looked here,
and he looked here,
he went on and on.

308When he failed (to see anyone),
he went back,
he went away,
and he got there.

309There he was,
there he was, until
“I’ll go back again,
and I’ll listen,” he thought,
and as for that,
at that (point), he came (back) again.

310He got there again,
he caught (another) person,
and (his brother) was there watching.

311He was here watching,
and he said,
“How extremely bad you are!
Here you are, but
you will never do (this) again as long as you live!”

312He said it,
he went on,
and (Kwayúu) heard him;
he went like this,
he looked,
(but) there was nobody there.
He was in the water,
the one who had said it,
and (Kwayúu) didn’t see him;
it was no use.

313He was around here,
and he went away;
he was over there,
he was over there, and suddenly,
people —
his relatives,
his mother and father were over there.
He got there, and suddenly —
when he got there,
he immediately went to sleep.
He lay down,
the river was nearby,
and he put his feet in the water,
and he lay down and lay there.

314He lay there sleeping.

315They were watching him,
and they said,
“Hey!
Get up!
Someone is coming after you!”
they said.

316“Get up!” they said,
and they went about waking him up.
“Someone is coming from somewhere,
you say,”
he said,
and he lay back down.

317They looked around.
“He’s coming,
I tell you!
Get up!” they went on saying.
He didn’t pay any attention at all.

318This one,
his older brother,
finally,
he went along,
well,
somehow,
the water is foamy, they say,
white people say it,
and I’ve heard them.
I’ve seen how foamy the water is.

319He covered his face with that, they say.

320He covered his face,
and he went upstream,
he went up that river,
and he went along, they say.

321He went along,
and he went along.

322He went along, and
“Something is coming!”
(his brother) said;
“I know it,” he said.
“It’s coming!
Get up!” he said.
“Get up!” he said;
he kept trying to get him up,
but it was no use.

323He got up,
and he saw it,
(this) thing,
his war club,
and he threw it into the water like this.
“Someone is coming from somewhere,
you say,
(but) there is nothing there.”

324“There is,
I am telling you!” he said,
and he kept on telling him,
but it was no use.

325(Kwayúu) continued to lie there.

326He lay there,
and at that (point),
somehow —
we came from somewhere, and so,
we were created,
and we were placed there.

327As for that,
this one,
that one,
our Creator,
what he didn’t see
(was) the war club.

328He carried it,
and he stuck it into the rock,
he went like this, and then,
he went like this.
He created the river,
and he made it go down, they say,
into the ocean.

329“As for this,
the river,
it’s called the Colorado (River),
and it is good for you people,”
(that’s what) he said,
as he was there.

330“There you are,
you are on the edge of the water.

331“So,
I have placed you here.

332“Someone is coming from somewhere,
and (something) might happen,”
he said,
and he lay back down, they say.
“That (might) happen,
it (might) happen, just as you said. ”

333“What are you doing?
It is happening,
I see it,
and things don’t look very good,”
he said,
and (his brother) didn’t want to listen;
he lay down and went to sleep;
it was no use;
(sleep) just took him,
and he went to sleep.

334He slept,
lying here.

335“He’s coming,
he’s nearby,
I tell you!”

336He said it,
he tried to wake him up,
but it was no use;
(Kwayúu) lay there sleeping.

337The fourth (time),
(his brother) got there,
and he pulled on his legs,
and he submerged them in the water, they say.

338They were submerged,
and they made (the water) bubble.
He brought him this way.
He brought him this way, and suddenly
the water ran very fast,
and it took him back again.
He brought him this way,
and he brought him this way.

339He brought him this way.
“You can’t do it.
You are doing it, (but)
I am powerful too,”
(Kwayúu) said.

340“My dreams are powerful.
You can never defeat me,”
he said.

341“It won’t happen.
I am not going to let you get up again,
I am doing it,”
(his brother) said in turn,
and he brought him along.

342He brought him along,
and at that (point),
(Kwayúu) struggled.
On his own, using his powers of thought,
he grew wings,

343***

344he went on and finished.
Well,
so,
he wanted to fly out away,
he was thinking about it.

345He lay here,
he went like this with his wings,
he went like this.
He went like this,
with those (wings).

346The ground,
this (surface) here,
it must have been wet,
and it shriveled up somehow, and so,
at that (point) —
he went like this with his wings,
and those (imprints that he made)
are still there, they say.

347*** *** ***

348That’s what he did,
he went like this with his wings,
and (the imprints) are still there, they say.

349They are still (there),
they are in the rock, like this,
they are.

350It happened,
and there they are.

351***

352He was coming this way again,
he wanted to get out of wherever he was,
and somehow,
the water was like this,
and so,
it had drained away there,
(but) it was still wet,
and as for this,
he was really struggling,
and he got up.

353So,
somehow he went along,
and he sat down there,
he did.

354He sat down there,
and so,
(his brother) tried harder,
he dragged him,
and he threw him into the water again,

355That (place) was dried up and turned to stone,
and (the imprint) is still (there) too, they say.

356It is still (there),
and as for that,
they call it Where Kwayúu Was Thrown Down On His Butt,
they named it, and so it is, they say.
Well,
it happened,
there it is,
and you’ve seen it;
it’s as if a person had sat down where it was wet, they say.

357So,
he caught him,
and he brought him,
and he brought him,
he kept on going,
and going,
and going.

358He kept on going,
and he brought him to that distant ocean.

359That’s where he died.

360Those wings were very big.
These (people) picked them up,
they went on pulling the feathers out,
and they finished.

361They made something (out of them), they say —
what is it?
It’s something called a teepee,
I’ve heard of it —
that’s what they made,
they went like this,
they stood the wings upright and they finished,
and he lay there inside.

362Our Creator was watching, they say,
although he didn’t see it, they say.

363“How bad you are!
You are both the same!
As for you,
it’s what you would do,
it’s your urge to kill things,
and I don’t want you to kill things!

364“You did it.
Whatever you did,
the two of you,
you did it because you are bad,
and you will never come to this place again!”

365When he said it,
he looked
at that.
There were a lot of these clouds,
they were really black,
and they were slowly passing by.

366So,
as he lay there watching them,
(those) things.

367That lightning,
he made it into something,
and he struck them with it,
he was doing this in the water,
and it destroyed everything.
Over there in the distance it killed him too, they say.

368(It killed him), too,
and that’s all,
it came to an end there,
it did, they say.

369So,
it was like this,
this thing that he did.
The people —
the (people) that were there,
they were looking,
and starting here,
they spoke against each other,
they didn’t like each other,
and they killed each other, they say.
The tribes didn’t like each other;
if a different tribe was over there,
they didn’t like them.

370So,
they made war with them,
they used to do that, they say.

371It happened,
they say,
this is what they say.
They tell about it.
They tell about it and bring it (to its conclusion).

Púk Atsé

372Told by Rosita Carr

373Pa'iipáats nyaváyk siivám,
makyíny,
Púk Atsé a'étəma.
Púk Atsé.

374Nyáany nyaváyk siivák,
vatsíim xavíkt.
Kwalyavíita.
Vatsíim.

375Viiványək,
siitháwk,
siitháwxayk,
kaa'éməntik a'ím,
kaváayk a'étəntik a'ím,
kaváayk,
pa'iipáa aaéevək —
kaawítsíi,
maawíi,
kaawítsk awíi a'ím.

376A'ím,
siivám,
xa—
vatsíinyts 'axá ayáak a'étəma.
'Axá ayáak.

377Kwaly'ó ta'úlyk,
viiyáak;
'axáts siithíkəm,
alyváamk,
nyaasa—
nyaapó kaa'émk,
viithíi a'ím,
siiv' áwxaym,
pa'iipáats katánmətək a'ím,
“'Axá nyiinykáaym,
'asítsú.”

378A'étxay,
“Kaváartək.”
'Atáyəm apótk athúm.
“Kaváar,” a'étxayəm,
mashtaráts a'íi kaa'émtək awím,
tatapóoyvək a'étəma.

379*** *** ***

380Nyaatatapóoyk,
vaanayémtək,
vaanayémtək athúm,
vanyaanayém,
vathány,
nyaayúuts,
Talypóts,
'axáasíi a'ím siithíik.

381Siithíixayk,
ayúutk.
Avathíkəm,
'axá kwaa'úurəny nyaatsamíim,
ka'ák ka'ák awét,
tamáar təsáa,
thomayúutəny.

382***

383Nyaayúutk,
vanyaavák,
viiyáak.

384Viiyáak,
nyaaváamək,
kanáavk.

385Kanáavtəs,
iiyáa shatmatháavək a'étəntima.
iiyáa uu'áav aly'ém.

386Iiyáa uu'áv aly'ém.
Shatmatháavət.

387Təm
uukanáavtək,
pa'iipáa nyáanya,
kwar'ákəny ashétk.

388“Púk Atsé —
vatsíits apúyk,”
a'étəs,
“Nyá nyá,
nyá nyá,
nyá nyá.”
'Atsa'ítsk avák:
“Póoy!
Póoy!”
a'épətəm a'ávəny.

389Nyáany ava'étk siivát.

390Siivátkəm,
kaawíts a'étəs,
iiyáa uu'áavək,
shtuupáaw alya'ém.

391Sanyaatháwk,
kaawíts ayáak a'étəma.
Kaawíts ayáak;
Kwash'iilá a'étk,
kwalyavíitəma.

392Kwash'iilá nyáany ayáak,
kamíim.

393*** *** ***

394Kamíim,
a'íi viivám,
shamathíitəntík a'étəma.
Shamathíitəntík.

395Shamathíitəntik.
“Kaa'émək viivák?” a'ítya.

396A'étk,
vanyuunóotəm,
pa'iipáa tsuuqwér xáam uu'ítsapat.
Nyáany ayáak,
kaméxayəm,
shtuupáaw alya'ém.

397Vuunóotənyk,
nyaa kwar'ák nyáava,
nyáanya,
ayáak a'étəma.

398Pa'iipáany nyiikanáavəm,
“Katsawém,
kawétsk katsaváwk,
'atskamuunóotanək,
kavuuthíik katsatspátsk!”

399Alyvák siivám,
nyáavəm.

400Tsatspátsk,
a'íi kwa'átsk vuunóom,
shuupáwk a'étəma.

401“'Avatsíits apúyk,
a'ím.
Kanáavək viivák,
nyaa'íiva,” a'ét.

402A'étəm,
aayáatk,
kamétk;
uutara'úy 'ím a'ítya.
Uutara'úyk.

403Nyaavíirək,
“'Axwé,
'axwé 'aayáatapatxa,”
a'ím.

404Nyáa kwawítsa.

405Nyiitatapóoyapat a'ím.

406'Atskanyaatháwk awím,
vaayáak a'étəm ám.
Pa'iipáanyts 'atáyk a'étk,
viitháwkəm.

407Vaayáak,
nyáasi —
kaawíts?
'ats'iipáy xáam kwathútsənyts —
“Nyáasi 'ashmáxa,”
a'étxay —
Maamathíits a'éxayk,
“Nyaayúu,
'a'íi paly'ón kwalypáa nyáasi 'aashmátsxa,”
a'étk a'étəntima.
Xáam uu'íts.

408*** *** ***

409Nyaa'étəntik,
vaayáatk.

410Vaayáatk,
nyaayúu Maxwáa a'étəma.

411Maxwáa nyáanyáanyts,
nyáanyts,
kaawíts ta'úlyk a'étəntim,
áa,
'aavé a'ét kwalyavíit.
'Aavé.
Áa.

412Nyáany awíim,
viiwáak,
nyáany,
nyiikw'aváy nyáasi,
'avuuyáak atápəm,
pa'iipáa tsakyíwəly a'íi kaa'émk awíim a'ítya.
Nyaawíim,
vaayáak apámk a'étəma.

413Nyaapámkəm,
nyiitatapóoyk a'étəma,
kwanyváaynya,
pa'iipáa nyaakwawítsnya.
Shuupáwk wór a'ím a'ítya.

414Nyaatatpóoyk,
“'Anyáats 'atatapóoyk!”
Sanya'ákəny awí lya'émtək a'étəma.
Nyamxuuvíka.

415Nyaawíi lya'émxayəm,
xuunmárəts pa'iipáyxaytəntik a'étəma.

416Piinapáyxaytəm,
nyáanya,
tapúy a'étk vuunóoxayəm —
kaawítsk atápk awím,
awéxayəm —
vaan'é a'étk,
vathík avátsk,
vaa'é a'étk,
vathík avátsk,
athótəm,
makyík kaawém aly'ém.

417Kaawém aly'émək,
nyaayúu,
'a'áw taráak,
alytsaváwxayəm,
uuv'áwk,
tsúu a'étəm,
makyík apúy alya'émətək a'étəma.

418Apúy alya'émtəm.

419Nyaayóovək,
“Aaíiməm 'antamákəm,
viivány,
matsáam apúytəxa.”

420Nyaa'étk,
natuumáak a'étəma.

421Nyiaantamáak,
xuumára,
nyiaantuumáak.

422'Aankóoyts siivántik a'éta.
Xuumárəny namáwəts.

423Nyiivántik,
nyáanyts,
nyáanyts xweyamántək avathík a'étəma.

424Akyáam,
akyétstəsáa,
apúy aly'émk a'étəma.

425Apúy lya'émtəm.
nyaayúuk,
xuumár aváts,
'atsshatamátstəkəm,
kaathóm,
nyamáam,
vanyaayáak,
'iipány uulyók atháwtək,
'aankóoyəny kwakyétsa.

426***

427Aa,
uulyók atháwtk.

428Vuunóotk aavíirtəm,
xótt-tək a'étəma.

429Nyaa'xóttkəm.

430'Aakóoyənyts nyaatháwk,
xuumárəny nyaatháwk,
kaawíts kanathíitapatk,
siitháwtək athúuk a'étəma.

431Siitháwtəm,
nyáava,
sanya'ákəva,
nyaatháwk,
vanyaawáak.

432Nyáa vatsíi apúy nyáanyts;
nyamxavík a'étəntima.
Nyamxavík.

433Tək
siitháwtək athúm,
xótt-təntim.
Iiwáa 'aláay aly'ém.

434***

435Siitháwtək,
təm,
'aakóoyts,
kaalwíts awétk vanyuunóok,
uunakwílytək.

436Aanakwílyk,
aanaxwílyk,
kaawítsk aaxwílyəm a'ítya.
Nyaaxwílyk.

437Kaawíts xalykwáak kuu'éeytək,
tsuumátsxa.

438Xalykwáak kuu'éeytəm,
xáyəm,
shamée kaa'émk,
amíi viithíkxáyəm
nyaayúuts atháwk a'étəntima.

439Nyaayúuts aváak atháwk.
Xam'uulól.

440Xam'uulól nyáanyts aváak atháwtək,
ava'étk,
nanamíilk a'íi kaa'émk,
lóləl lóləl a'étk vuunóotxayəm,
'aakóoyəny nyaaváak,
xam'uulóləny tatapóoyk a'ét.
Masharáyk.

441Nyaatatpóoyk,
xuumárənyts amíim a'étəntima.
Wanyəmnyaavárəntik.
Áa-áa,
wanymaavárəntik.

442Amíim siivám,
nyaayúuk,
awíi lya'émək táamək a'étəntima.

443Namák 'atsknyaayém.
Suuváaxayk,
xuumárənyts,
iiwáam ayáatk —
nyaayúu 'uutíish anawéeytsəm,
kaawíts akyétk amátk,
amátk awétk,
amátstək a'étəntima.

444Asóotstək.

445Siitháwtək,
siitháwtənyək,
nyáanyəm,
pa'iipáa kwa'atsláytsənyts tsapéenypatk a'étəma,
nyakóra.

446Pa'iipáa kaawíts a'étəm ám.
Ashiittəma.

447Kwayúu a'étk,
pa'iipáats avuuváatəntik,
'atsathóshk a'étəntik,
'Aakóoy Kaa'íts avuuváak,
Mattkwashtaxathúuk,
'Aakóoy Mattkwashtaxathúuk a'étəma.

448“Nyáanya,
nyaakwayúuk,
sakyínyk!” a'ím.

449“Matapúyúm,” a'ím,
'aankóoyənyts uukanáavək.

450'Atsxalykwáak uuváamk,
iiwáam,
nyaayúu uumáxany nyaaxalykwáantik vuuváak.

451A'étəm,
a'ávtəs,
avathík;
sakyíny alya'émək a'étəma.

452Sakyíny alya'émək,
siiv'áwəm,
vathíi kwa'átsk a'étəma.
'Aakóoyəts,
vathíi kwa'áts.

453Vathíi kwa'átsk,
vaawé a'étk atháwk,
uuthóshk alytsaváwət a'étəma.
Uuthóshkəny.

454Nyaatsaváwk,
viiwáamk;
viiyáak,
“Ka'wém tanək 'atapúyəly” a'íi viiyáak —
'atsuuthóshkəny tapómək a'étəma.

455Nyaatapómək,
atspámək.

456Nyaatspám,
'aakóoyənyts apómtək,
apúytək a'étəma.

457***

458Áa-áa,
nyáanyənyts.

459Nyaapúyəm,
viiyémk aváamək,
kanáavək,
namáwnya,
uukanáav.

460“Av'awé'əsh,” a'íim,
'aakóoyəny uukanáav.

461“Matháwk,
nyaamatapúy a'íim,
nyaathúuva.
Avathíkəntik,
pa'iipáa 'atsláytsəts,”
a'íim,
uukanáavək.

462Uukanáavəm,
a'áv alya'emək,
viiyáatəntik.
Viiyáatəntik.

463Viiyáaxayəm —
kaawíts?
kaa'émək ashíit? —
'amáyƚy siivák,
nyáanyts,
Iiyáam Kwakáap a'íik a'émtəma.
Kaawíts athúm a'ítya.

464Nyáanyts,
atháw a'étk,
anyíilyəqətəntík a'étəm,
tsanapéevtəm.

465Anyíilyqətəxayəm,
ayúu tank,
vathíi ayúuk viiwáamək,
makyím,
matásh alya'éməm,
nyaayúuk,
nyáanya,
kaawíts atséwəntik,
'íi!
kaa'émək awím:
uutssúlyk atspámk a'étəntima.

466Nyaatspámək,
vatháts apúytəntik,
pa'iipáavəts.

467***

468Nyaathúum,
siiyáaxayəm,
nyaayúuts awétəntík a'étəma.
'Ashpáa.

469'Ashpáa nyáanyts,
'avíily sata'ótsəts siitháwəm,
siivám,
siiyáantim;
viiyémək.
'Anyáa kwashíintəm,
athótk,
kwalyavíitəma.

470Nyiitháaw a'íim,
viiyáaxayəm,
kashák!
Atháwət a'íikətama,
'ashpáanyányts.

471Nyaatháwk,
sata'óts nyáanyts uusáav a'íim nyiitsamíim.

472Nyiitsamíim,
a'ím,
'iipáyk,
niwaníw a'éxayəm,
mashtatháav.

473Mashtatháavək,
uusáav aly'émək a'étəntima.

474Uusáav aly'émək,
siitháwxaym,
kaawémtəntík:
tatpóoyk a'étəma.
Tatpóoyk.

475Nyaavíirəntik,
viiyémk,
'aakóoyəny uukanáavək vuunóok a'étəma.

476“Ka'wémək,
pa'iipáa 'atsláyts muu'ítsəny,
'tapóoyk va'uunóok,” a'éta.

477A'íim,
“Yaamakuupéttənyts tamatháavtək,” a'íim,
wanyiiráv kuu'éeyk suunóo.

478Vuunóom,
suuváanyk,
siiyáantixáyəm,
nyáanya —
kaa'émək 'ashéxa? —
ayúum.
Kwayúu a'étəma.
Pa'iipáa vatáyəts athúum a'ítya,
nyáanyts.

479'Axály avátəntik uuvátk a'étəma.
'Axály —
xaatspáay,
kaawíts.

480Alyvátəntík uuvát,
vanyaayáak,
alyvakaméek ayúu.

481Ayúum.

482“Ka'a'émək?” a'étəma.

483“Ka''émək?”
“Viikayémək,” a'íi.

484Kaa'ém tan,
nyiiv'áwk,
uutíishəny tsa'úlytək awím,
akyáam 'ím,
ava'áwk a'étəma.

485Nyaakyáam.

486Vuunóoxayəly,
atháwk a'étəma.

487Nyaatháwəntik,
nyáany,
kaawíts athótk athúm,
'amáy takxávək a'étəma.

488Nyáanyts atsénək,
pa'iipáa atháwk,
viiwémək
nyáasily.

489Sanyts'áak uutséts tsuumpápk a'étəma.

490Tsuumpápk,
'amáy alythík aatsuumpáp alyatháwk,
a'étəma.

491Alyatháwəm.

492Nyáany nyaakamémk,
tapúyk,
tarúvək,
aax'ák.
Kanyaa'íim,
kamémxayk,
alyúlytsək,
nyáanyts,
kwatsuumpáp nyáanyənyts.

493Shuuvíim,
asóo av'áarək.

494Asóo av'árək suuváak awíim,
xuumár vathány atháwk,
viiwémtək a'étəma.

495Vanyaawémk,
apáav a'ím a'étəma.

496Apáav a'ím.
“Kawítsk,” a'ítsəm,
awítsxayəly,
avathótəntik.

497Tsanapéevxáyəm,
awítsəm,
awíim,
tapúy a'íim,
vatsuuváarək.

498Nyaalyavíitəntik a'étəma.
'A'áw taráaxáyəly,
uuv'áwtəm,
atspátstək.

499Awétk a'étəntíma.

500Awétəntím,
kaawémk,
tapúy a'ím vuunóonyk,
nyaavatsuuváarək.

501A'ím
ayúut uuváanyək,
“Apúytəxa,”
nyaa'étk
antuumáaktək a'étəma.

502Antuumáaktsəm,
nyaayúu,
xaym,
'a'íi kaawíts ayáatk,
kaawíts a'ítstəm,
suuváatk.

503Suuváatnyək,
“Ka'athóm tank?
'Atakavék 'atsénəlya,”
a'étk,
alynyiithúutsk suuváak a'étəma.

504Sanyuuváak.

505***

506Sanyuuváanyk,
nyaayúu nyáany,
pa'iipáa tuupúy kwarúv nyáany,
sanyts'áak vatháts tawáam vuunóok,
shuuvíik a'étəma.

507Shuuvíik,
nyaayúu,
bowl vatáts tan a'íts awíim,
alyaasáarək,
aasárək;
tsuumpápk a'étəma.

508Tsuumpáp.

509Nyáanya,
nyaayúu 'avíi athíik a'étəma.

510'Avíi,
kayáaíi,
kaawémk vanyuunóok
nyáany,
alytsaváwk.

511Alytsaváwk,
awíim,
kwatapáar tan vathánya,
athóoyvətant,
kwalyavíita.
Athóoyvətanəm,
alytsaváw.

512Suuváam,
nyaasíim.

513Atsénək,
takavék nyaaváamək,
asíi va'áarəm a'étəma.
Aava'áarəm.

514Awéxáyəly —
'ashént aséxayk —
'aláayəm a'ávək a'éta.
'Aláayəm a'ávtəs.
Awét.

515Tsáam,
kwaxavík,
kwaxamók,
kwatsuumpáp,
vathí,
nyáavəts athóoyvətantək awím,
nyáanyats,
malyaqényi kaawém,
apúyk a'étəntima.

516Nyaapúyəm,
sanyuuváak.
“Ka'thóm tanək?
Vi'ayéməly,” a'íim suuváak.

517Suuváam,
sanyts'áakənyts,
“Nyiinyaatuuqwíirək,
'anayémapatk,
'aaly'étka,”
a'ítsk a'étəma.

518A'ítsəm.
“Kaváarək.
Ka'wémək 'awíyúm,”
a'íim,
suuváak.

519Ssanyuuváam a'ím —
kaawíts? —
kaawíts mattatséwk a'étəma.

520*** *** ***

521Nyaayúu mattatséwk 'éta,
'Iipá.

522Áa-á,
arrow.
Áa,
mattatséwk.

523“Av'awétxa,”
a'íim,
uukanáavtsəm.

524“Viimayáak,
maváamtəxa,”
a'ítsəm,
athúu,
viithíik athúuk a'étəma.
Viithíik.

525Nyavány 'avuumák ta'axán,
shátt nyaa'íim.

526“Nyaamaváamək,
makyík vaathóxa ma'íim,
'avá xán alymaxáv alyma'émətxa.

527“Shamáts tsuumpáp nyiiyéməm,
mayúuxa,
'aakóoynya,”
a'ítstəm.

528Siiv'áw kuu'éeytənyk,
avathúum a'étəma.

529Avathúum,
aváamk mattkanáavək,
'aakóoyəny uukanáavək,
“Pa'iipáa muu'ítsəny 'atapúyəntik,”
a'íikəm.

530*** *** ***

531A'íim,
siitháwk a'étəma.

532Siitháwk amáam,
'akútstək,
athúm,
nyaayúu,
'aqwáaq akyáam,
kamémək,
aax'ák kuu'éeyk,
asóotstək athótk.
Siitháwtək a'étəma.

533Siitháwtənyək —
siitháwtənyək,
kaawíts nyaaxalykwáantik,
suuváaxayəm,
sanya'ák nyáava —
sata'óts a'étk kwalyavíita,
suunóok,
ayóovək a'étəma.

534Xayəm,
nyaayúu mattantséwk a'étəma.
Kwashkyéevək.
Kwashkyéevək asan'áw.

535Shuunrémxay.

536Mattatséwk,
siivám,
shuupáwk.
Shuupáwk.

537“'Aakóoy nyaa'aváaməm,
tapúytsxa 'aaly'íim.”

538Awím,
atháwk viiwáak kamémək.
Nyáava antáyənyts nyaváyk siivám a'étəma.
Antáyənyts.

539Kamémxáyəm,
shuupáwtək a'ím,
“Kuuthíim 'ayúuwú,”
a'ím a'étk kwalyavíita,
kwara'ákats.

540Kwara'ákats shuupáwkəm,
ayúuk,
a'ím,
awéxay,
ayérək a'étəma.
Ayérək.

541Uuváak,
uuváak,
nyaayúuk,
áa,
'avá vaathúts kwa'áts,
'avá shupétt kwa'áts athótəm,
nyaayúu atséwtsəntik athúm,
'amáyəny 'avuutsúly a'étəntima.

542Uunakúpk,
'amáyəly tsaváwət.

543Nyaanyəm,
nyáanyəm nyaatspák,
viiyém'əsh.

544***

545Xuumárəvəts,
áa,
viiyém'əsh.
Viiyém'əsh.

546Viiyémk,
siiyáak,
siiyáam,
tatuuvíirək, viiwáatsənyk,
alyvatsuuváarək a'étəntima.

547Atháwəts aly'ém.

548Siiyáanyək,
nyáasi.

549***

550Nyáanya,
nyaanyamáam,
'ashuupáwtək'a.

551Nyaanyamáam,
siiyáanyək vatsuuváarək
a'étəm 'a'avtək'ash.
A'étəm 'a'ávtəka.

552Áa,
nyiimántək siiyáas,
'ashmátk 'a'áv aly'émk 'a'épəm ma'ám.

553That’s right.

554Nyáanyi kanáavtəm 'a'ávtək'ash.

Translation

555Someone was living there,
and whoever it was,
he was called Púk Atsé, they say.
Púk Atsé.

556He was living over there,
he was with his daughter.
It was something like that.
With his daughter.

557Here he was,
there they were,
they were over there, and suddenly,
for some reason,
they decided to go from house to house,
and they went from house to house,
inviting people —
perhaps they were going to do something,
for their relatives,
they were going to do something.

558So,
there he was,
and water —
his daughter went to get water, they say.
She went to get water.

559She carried a pottery jar,
and she went along;
the water was over there,
and she got there,
and over there,
somehow she put (water) into (the pot),
and she was about to come back,
she was standing over there, when all of a sudden,
some people got there and said,
“Give us some water,
and we’ll drink.”

560They said it, and immediately,
“No,” (she said).
She had put a lot of water (in the pot).
“No,” she said, and all of a sudden,
they must have gotten angry, and so,
they killed her, they say.

561*** *** ***

562When they killed her,
they left,
they left, and so,
when they left,
at this (point),
somebody,
it was Roadrunner,
he came from what they call salt water.

563He was coming from over there, and suddenly,
he saw her.
She was lying there,
they had laid her at the edge of the water,
they had gone kick, kick,
and they had partially buried her, but
she was still visible.

564***

565He saw her,
here he was,
and he went off.

566He went off,
and when he got there,
he told them.

567He told them, but
they didn’t know his language, they say.
They didn’t understand his language.

568They didn’t understand his language.
They didn’t know it.

569And
he explained it to them,
those people,
and he mentioned the old man by name.

570“Púk Atsé —
his daughter is dead,”
he tried to say, but
“Nyá nyá
nyá nyá
nyá nyá,” (is what they heard).
He was saying things:
“Póoy!
Póoy!”
(that’s what) they heard him say.

571That’s what he was saying.

572There he was, and so,
he might have said something, but
they didn’t understand his language,
they didn't know it.

573There they were,
and they went after someone, they say.
They went after someone;
he was called Mockingbird,
(his name) was something like that.

574They went after that Mockingbird,
and they brought him back.

575*** *** ***

576They brought him back,
and (Roadrunner) was saying it,
and (Mockingbird) didn’t know (what he was saying).
He didn’t know either.

577He didn’t know either.
“What is he saying?” he said.

578So,
here they were,
and he said it again in a different kind of human speech.
They went after those (other people),
and when they brought them back,
they didn’t know either.

579Here they were,
and this old man,
he was the one,
they went and got him, they say.

580He told the people,
“Take him out,
and put him down,
you guys are just hanging around,
bring him out here!”

581(Roadrunner) was in there,
at this (point).

582They brought him out,
and he was saying just what he had said,
and (the old man) knew what he was saying, they say.

583“My daughter is dead,
he says.
He is telling about it,
that’s what he’s saying,” (the old man) said.

584So,
they went after her,
and they brought her back;
they were going to prepare her (for cremation), they say.
They prepared her.

585When they finished,
“The enemy,
we will go after the enemy,”
they said.

586(They meant) the ones who had done that.

587They were going to kill them in turn.

588(People) were around in various places, and so,
they were going to go after the enemy.
There were a lot people, they say,
here they were.

589They went along,
and over there in the distance —
which one was it?
they were all different kinds of creatures —
“I’ll sleep over there,”
he said, and immediately —
Owl said it, and immediately,
“Well,
we’ll sleep over there in the tree stump,”
they said in turn.
(Each one) wanted something different.

590*** *** ***

591When they were ready to go again,
off they went.

592Off they went.
and (one) creature was Badger, they say.

593That Badger,
he was the one,
he was carrying something,
yes,
it seemed to be what they call a snake.
A snake.
Yes.

594He did that,
he brought it,
that (snake),
and over there where (the enemy) was living,
he threw it toward their door,
he did it so that it would bite people, they say.
Then,
they went along and got there, they say.

595When they got there,
they killed them, they say,
the ones who lived there,
the people who had done it.
They knew for certain (that they were the ones), they say.

596When they killed them,
“We killed them!” (they said).
But they didn’t kill the woman, they say.
His wife.

597They didn’t do it, and suddenly,
(they saw that) a newborn baby was still alive, too, they say.

598He was newly born,
that (baby),
and they were trying to kill him, and suddenly —
they threw something at him,
they did, and suddenly —
he went like this,
and here he was;
he moved back,
and here he was;
and so,
they never were able to do anything to him.

599They weren't able to do anything to him,
well,
they lit a fire,
and they put him in it, and immediately,
it (started to) rain,
(the rain) poured down,
and he never did die, they say.

600He didn’t die.

601When they saw this,
“We’ll leave him to do as he pleases,
and he (will) sit here,
and he will starve to death.” They said it,
and they left him, they say.

602They left him there,
the child,
they left him there.

603A little old lady was over there, they say.
She was the child’s grandmother.

604She was there too,
and she was the one,
she was lying there unconscious, they say.

605Someone had shot her,
they had shot her, but
she wasn’t dead, they say.

606She wasn’t dead,
and when he saw that,
this child.
he had dreams (which gave him power),
somehow,
and that’s all,
he went,
and he pulled the arrow out,
(out of) the old lady who had been shot.

607***

608Yes,
he pulled it out.

609He went on and finished,
and she was all right, they say.

610She was all right.

611The old lady took him,
she took the child,
and they came along doing whatever it was,
and there they were, they say.

612There they were,
and as for this one,
this woman,
(Púk Atsé) took her,
he took her.

613She was (taking the place of) his dead daughter;
and they were together, they say.
They were together.

614And,
there they were, and so,
he was all right again.
He didn’t feel bad (any more).

615***

616There they were over there,
and (meanwhile),
the old lady,
she was using little things,
and making a little cradle.

617She made a little cradle,
and she pulled it along behind her,
and she propped it against something, they say.
She propped it up.

618She did her best to hunt for something,
so that they could eat.

619She did her best to hunt,
and right away,
somehow the baby missed her,
he lay there crying, and suddenly
creatures were there, they say.

620Creatures got there and there they were.
Crickets.

621Those crickets got there and there they were,
and they said something,
they tried to comfort the child somehow,
they were going chirp chirp,
and when the old lady got there,
she killed the crickets, they say.
She was angry.

622When she killed them,
the child cried, they say.
He had liked them.
Yes,
he had liked them.

623He was crying,
and she saw (this),
and she didn’t do it any more, they say.

624She left him and went off to various places.
There he was, and all of a sudden,
the child,
he went off on his own —
she had made a little thing like a bow for him,
and he shot something and ate it,
he ate it,
they (both) ate it, they say.

625They (both) ate it.

626There they were,
there they were,
and at that (point),
there were a lot of bad people, they say,
long ago.

627She mentioned certain people.
She listed them by name.

628(One of them) was called Kwayúu (The One Who Sees),
and there was also someone (else),
she carried things on her back, they say,
Old Lady Something-or-Other was around somewhere,
Flesh-Ripper,
Old Lady Flesh-Ripper, they say.

629“As for that one,
anyone who sees her,
(had better) run away!” she said.

630“She will kill you,” she said,
the little old lady told (the child) about her.

631He was hunting for things,
by himself,
he was hunting for things to eat.

632She said it,
and he heard her, but
there he was;
he didn’t run away, they say.

633He didn’t run away,
he stood (his ground),
and she came along, just as he had been told, they say.
The Old Lady,
she came along, just as he had been told.

634She came along, just as he had been told,
and she caught him like this,
and she put him into her bundle, they say.
(Into) her bundle.

635She put him (into her bundle),
and off she went;
she went along,
she went along wondering, “How can I kill him?” —
and she burned her bundle, they say.

636When she burned it,
he escaped.

637He escaped,
and the Old Lady burned,
and she died, they say.

638***

639Yes,
she was the one.

640When she died,
he went (home) and got there,
and he told her about it,
his grandmother,
he told her about it.

641“I did this,” he said,
and he told the old woman about it.

642“She took you,
and she was going to kill you,
that’s for certain.
There are (other ones) too,
bad people,”
she said,
and she told him about them.

643She told him,
but he didn’t listen,
and he went along again.
He went along again.

644He was going along, and all of a sudden —
what was it?
what’s his name? —
he was up in a high place,
he was the one,
he was called Iiyáam Kwakáap, they say.
He did something, they say.

645He was the one,
he caught (the boy),
and he swallowed him, they say,
because he was so little.

646He swallowed him, and immediately,
(the boy) looked around,
he went along looking;
and someplace,
(the tissue) was not thick,
and when he saw it,
that (place),
he made (a weapon),
and gee!
he did it somehow:
he ripped through it and he escaped again, they say.

647He escaped,
and this one died too,
this person.

648***

649Then,
he was going along there, when suddenly
a creature did it again, they say.
It was an eagle.

650That eagle,
(she and) her babies were there on the mountain,
she was there,
and (the boy) was going along;
and (the eagle) left.
Every day,
it happened,
it was something like that.

651There they were, and so,
(the boy) was going along, and all of a sudden
she grabbed him with her talons!
She caught him, they say,
that eagle (did).

652She caught him,
and she put him down so those babies could eat him.

653She put him down there,
and so,
he was alive,
he was wiggling, and immediately,
they were afraid of him.

654They were afraid of him,
and they didn’t eat him, they say.

655They didn't eat him,
there they were,
and somehow he did it again:
he killed them, they say.
He killed them.

656Once again, when he was finished,
he went home,
and he told the old lady about it, they say.

657“Somehow,
these bad people you told me about,
I am killing them off,” he said.

658So,
“Your craziness makes (things) difficult,” she said,
and she went about scolding him as best she could, poor thing.

659She went on,
and there he was,
he was still going after (bad people), and suddenly,
that one —
what do we call him? —
he saw him.
He is called Kwayúu (The One Who Sees).
He was a very big person, they say,
that (Kwayúu).

660He was there in the water, they say.
In the water —
in a well,
or something.

661He was sitting in it,
and (the boy) went,
and he stood at the edge (of the water) and looked.

662He saw him.

663“How can I do it?” he said.

664“How can I do it?”
“Go away,” (Kwayúu) said.

665Somehow (the boy) managed to do it,
he stood there,
he held his bow in his hand, and so,
he was going to shoot him,
he was standing there, they say.

666He shot him.

667There they were, and suddenly,
(Kwayúu) caught him, they say.

668He caught him,
that (boy),
and he did something, and so,
he took him up into the sky, they say.

669He was the one who came down,
and caught people,
and took them away
to that distant (place).

670There were four women that he put there, they say.

671There were four of them,
they were in the four levels of heaven,
they say.

672There they were.

673He brought those (people) there,
and he killed them,
and he dried (their flesh),
he hung it up.
Sometimes,
he brought them, and immediately,
they cooked them,
those (women did),
those four (women did).

674They made them into gravy,
and he ate them.

675He ate them, and so,
he took this child,
he took him there, they say.

676He took him there,
and he was going to have him roasted, they say.

677He was going to have him roasted.
“Do it,” he said,
and while they were trying to do it,
it happened again.

678(The boy) was small, and right away,
they did it,
and so,
they tried to kill him,
and they failed.

679It was like that (other time), they say.
While they were trying to start the fire,
it started to rain,
and he escaped.

680He did it again, they say.

681He did it again,
and somehow,
they went on trying to kill him,
and they failed.

682So,
they were watching him;
“He will die,”
they said,
and they let him go, they say.

683They let him go,
and, well,
right away,
he went to get wood or whatever,
(he did) whatever they said,
there he was.

684There he was, and eventually,
“How can I do it?
“I want to go back down,”
he said,
and he thought about it, they say.

685There he was.

686***

687There he was, and eventually,
those creatures,
those people who had been killed and dried,
the women went about grinding them up,
and they made gravy, they say.

688They made gravy,
well,
they used really big bowls,
they poured (the gravy) in,
they poured it;
there were four (portions), they say.

689Four.

690As for that,
(the boy) came to get rocks or something, they say.

691The rocks,
maybe he sharpened them,
he went about doing something
to those (rocks),
and he put them in.

692He put them in,
and so,
this very last one,
it was really sharp,
it was like that.
It was really sharp,
and he put it in.

693He was there
when (Kwayúu) drank it.

694He went down,
and when he got back (home),
he always drank, they say.
He always did.

695He did it, and suddenly —
he drank the first (bowl), and suddenly —
he felt (something) go wrong, they say.
He must have felt (something) go wrong.
He did.

696All of them,
the second,
the third,
the fourth,
and here,
this one was really sharp, and so,
that (sharp rock),
it did something in his throat,
and he died, they say.

697He died,
and (the boy) was still over there.
“How will I do it?
I want to go away,” he was saying.

698There he was,
and the women (said),
“We’re with you,
we’ll go away too,
we think,”
they said, so they say.

699They said it.
“No.
I don’t know how I could do it,”
he said,
and there he was.

700There he was, and so —
what was it? —
he turned himself into something, they say.

701*** *** ***

702He turned himself into something, they say.
An arrow.

703Yes,
an arrow.
Yes,
he turned himself into it.

704“I will do it,”
he said,
and they told him (how).

705“Go along,
you’ll get there,”
they said,
and he did it,
he came along, they say.
He came along.

706Right behind his house,
he came straight down there.

707“When you get there,
she will be like this somewhere, but
you must not go into the house.

708“When four nights have passed,
you will see her,
the old lady,”
they had said.

709He did his best to stand there, poor thing,
he did that, they say.

710He did that,
he got there and he told about himself,
he told the old lady,
“I have killed the person you told me about,”
he said.

711*** *** ***

712So,
there they were, they say.

713There they were, and finally,
(the boy) got older,
and so,
well,
he shot a deer,
and he brought it back,
and he did his best to hang it up, poor thing,
and they ate it.
There they were, they say.

714There they were, and eventually —
there they were, and eventually,
he was hunting for something again,
there he was, and suddenly,
this woman —
they seemed to be her children,
they were around,
and they saw him, they say.

715Immediately,
he changed himself into something tiny, they say.
A dove.
A baby dove.

716A newly hatched (dove).

717He changed himself,
and there he was,
and they recognized him.
They recognized him.

718“When we get to the old lady’s house,
I think they will kill him.”

719So,
they picked him up and brought him there.
His mother was living over there, they say.
His mother.

720As soon as they brought him there,
they recognized him, and so,
“Bring him so that I can see him,”
he said something like that,
the old man (did).

721The old man recognized him,
he saw him,
and so,
he did, and immediately,
(the boy) flew away, they say.
He flew away.

722There he was,
there he was,
and he saw it,
well,
it was a house like this, just as they had said,
it was a winter house, just as they had said,
and they had made something,
it was a smoke hole at the top, they say.

723They had made a little hole,
they had put it in the roof.

724And it was through that (hole),
he went out through that,
and he went away.

725***

726The boy,
well,
he went away.
He went away.

727He went away,
he went along,
he went along,
and they chased him,
they went on and on,
but they couldn’t do it, they say.

728They couldn’t catch him.

729They went along there,
over there in the distance.

730***

731As for this story,
that’s all,
(as far as) I know it.

732That’s all,
they went along in the distance and never did catch him,
I’ve heard them say so.
I’ve heard them say so.

733Yes,
he started there and went along in the distance, but
I fell asleep and didn’t hear it all, as I’ve told you.

734That’s right.

735I heard them tell that story.

Acheter