Version classiqueVersion mobile

Stories from Quechan Oral Literature

 | 
A. M Halpern
, 
Amy Miller

2. Two Stories About the Orphan Boy and the Monster

'Aréey. Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée (Seven Heads)

Quechan elder et John Comet
Traduction de Millie Romero, Barbara Levy, George Bryant et Amy Miller

Texte intégral

1This chapter presents two narratives about an orphan boy and a sevenheaded monster. These stories appear to have been influenced by European folklore (as discussed below), yet they are nonetheless very much Quechan stories. For readers who are unfamiliar with Quechan literature, they provide a relatively simple plot while introducing Quechan themes, literary devices, and rhetorical style. Readers who are already expert in Quechan oral literature will appreciate the ingenuity with which these stories integrate European and traditional Quechan ideas.

2The two narratives in this chapter focus on different events: ‘Aréey on the difficult journey the boy must make in order to reach the monster, and Tsakwsha Kwapaaxkyée on the details of the fight between the two main characters and the events which unfold after the monster is killed.

Notes and synopsis: ‘Aréey

3This story was told to Halpern on March 14, 1979 by a Quechan elder (born in 1923) who asked to remain anonymous. The elderʹs niece, Millie Romero, was also present, and explained that the story had been told to the elder by her parents as a bedtime story. Halpern later reviewed his transcript of the story with Millie Romero.

4The main character is an orphan boy who lives under the authority of a character called ‘Aréey (see below for the significance of this name). ‘Aréey mistreats and imprisons the boy. Eventually a monster threatens the population, and everyone who tries to kill the monster fails. The orphan boy volunteers for the job, but his offer is rejected with scorn. He uses his spiritual powers to escape from confinement, overcome tremendous obstacles, and kill the monster. He returns home with the monsterʹs seven tongues to prove that he has done the deed.

5The seven-headed monster in this story is referred to as ‘Aavém Kwasám but bears no resemblence to the character of the same name in Chapter 6.

Notes and synopsis: Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée (Seven Heads)

6John Comet told the story Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée to Abe Halpern on January 31, 1981.

7In this story, a village is besieged by an unknown predator. Sheep and other domestic animals are being killed and eaten at night, and no-one can figure out who the predator is or how to stop him. Finally an orphan boy who lives in the village discovers that the monster Seven Heads is responsible. He seeks out Seven Heads and, against all odds, succeeds in killing him. He cuts off the monsterʹs seven tongues and carries them home, where his cat swallows them.

8Soon another person finds the body of Seven Heads and takes credit for killing the monster. The orphan boyʹs cat regurgitates the monsterʹs seven tongues, and everyone realizes that the true hero is the orphan boy. The man who made the false claim is cruelly punished, and the people have a feast to celebrate the death of the monster.

European influence and the significance of these stories in the study of oral literature

9Both of the narratives in this chapter involve an orphan boy who kills a seven-headed monster and cuts out his tongues. A similar monster meets a similar fate in some European fairy tales; see for example the story of Georgik and Merlin (Cadic 2013). In the story of Georgik and Merlin, just as in Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée, a dishonest person takes credit for killing the monster and is revealed as an impostor when the monsterʹs severed tongues are found. It should be noted that apart from these shared points of plot, the stories in Chapter 2 are very different from the fairy tale of Georgik and Merlin.

10Other details provide further suggestion of European influence. In the story called ‘Aréey, the name of the title character is borrowed from the Spanish word rey (‘king’), and the character has much in common with royal antagonists in European fairy tales. The fact that the monster has seven heads is another revealing detail. Seven is a significant number in European culture. In traditional Quechan culture, on the other hand, the ritual number is four: events of ritual significance are performed four times or last for four days (see chapters 3-6 of this volume, Halpern 1997, and Bryant and Miller 2013), and in the Creation story, Sky Snake had four heads (see Bryant and Miller 2013). Third, both of the stories in this chapter depict acts of cruelty — for instance, in one story, ‘Aréey imprisons the orphan boy, and in the other, the guilty impostor is tied to a mule and dragged to death — which may have been inspired by the behavior of whites toward Native Americans.

11In spite of European influence, the two stories in Chapter 2 are rich in traditional Quechan elements. For instance, in the story called ‘Aréey, the orphan boy protagonist has spiritual powers which allow him to change form at will. Thanks to these powers, he is able to complete a dangerous journey at which ordinary people have failed. In the story Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée, the Quechan ritual number four coexists alongside the Western significant number seven: the monster Seven Heads breaks four knives, and it is after the fourth knife is finally broken that the orphan boy manages to kill him.

12Since it evidently arose after contact with Europeans, the story complex of the orphan boy and the seven-headed monster constitutes a relatively new addition to Quechan oral literature. It provides a window onto the process by which an oral literature might adapt, expand, and enrich itself with new ideas. It also serves as a case study of a story complex in the early stages of development, its narratives already diversifying thanks to the imagination, resourcefulness, and diverse perspectives of Quechan storytellers.

'Aréey

13Told by an anonymous Quechan elder

14Xuumár xatál vatháts uuváakitya.
Maxáyt.
Vanyuuváak,
'Aréeyts atháwkitya.
Xwaatháwk.

15***

16Nyaatháwk awím,
aataruuxáarək —
apúy.
Apúyk ayáatənyk uuváakitya.

17Vanyuuvám,
'Aréeyənyts a'ím.
Xuumár kwxatáləny a'ím,
“'Anytsuutsétsəny matháwk,
maas'úlyk,
xamáalyk,
aaráar a'ím,
muukavék matakxávəxa.”

18'Aréeyənyts a'ím
xuumárəny —
kwaxatáləny a'ím.

19A'ím,
nyaa'ávək,
xuumár kwxatálənyts
nyatsuutsétsəny nyaatháwk,
vanyaayáakəm
xaasa'íly kwa'úurəm.
Nyaaváamək aas'úlyk,
aas'úly kuu'éeyk uuváa.

20Xamáaly ly'émək iikwévəm,
nyaayúuk,
amíim siiv'áwt.
Nyaxátt-ts xavík.
Nyaxátt-ts nyíily tík a'ím.
Nyaxáttəntim nyiivák,
ayúuk uuvá.

21Xátt kwanyíilyənyts ayúuk avathík a'ím,
“Kamíi alyka'émək.
Avány,
tsuutsétsnya,
nyaakata'ámək,
shaly'áyəny awím,
vaawée
vaawée
vaawée
vaawé.
Kawíim kuunóok,
katkavéekəm,
aváts xamáalytan,
páq a'ím,
aaráar a'ím.
Matakxávtəxa.”

22“Xottk.”

23A'ím,
nyaatháwk,
viiwáak,
'aréeyəny áayk.
'Aréeyəny nya-áayəm,
tsuutsétsk vuunóok;
“Nyáava xuumár 'uuxéerxats,
vathány.”

24Xatálək a'ím.

25Sáa

26xuumár vatháts kwasuuthíiny matt-tsapéek.

27Uuváas athótk,
mattuuxatálək vanyuuváakəm,
axéerək nyaatsaváwtsəm.

28***

29Nyaatsaváwtsəm,
siivám,
nyáanyəm pa'iipáa nyaaéev,
'atsuumáav a'ím vuunóokəm.
Pa'iipáanyts apámək vuunóom,
vathány axéertsəm alyvák viivák.
Nyavály avák siivá.

30A'ávək uuvátəm,
a'ávək uuváxáyəm,
pa'iipáanyəny 'Aréeyənyts a'ím,
pa'iipáanya nyiitskakwék,
“Máam,
pa'iipáa maamakyípəts alymavák
'Aavém Kwasám matapúy mayáam?
Matapúyxa maaly'íim?”

31A'éxáyəm,
pa'iipáanyəny,
pa'iipáa 'ashént alyav' áwk
kayáak viiyáany,
nyiikwévəm,
takavék aváa.

32Xáyəm,
nya'ashéntits ayáanys,
nyiikwévəm,
pílyəm púyk,
takavék aváa.

33Vanyuuváak,
xuumár kwxatál aváts siiv'áwk,
Aréeyəny a'ím,
“'Anyáa 'ayáaxa.”
“Maxuumárək nyiimakwévək,
kaawíts maxwíivək mawíyúm,”
a'étəm.

34“'Anyáa 'ayáak” a'ét.
“'Anyáa 'ayáak,
'Aavém Kwasám 'atapúyxa.
'Akamíim,
muuyúumxá.”

35A'ím,
pa'iipáanyənyts aatsxwáaaar a'étəm,
makyík xalypámk.

36Xalypámk a'ím,
aatsxwáar a'ítsəm a'ávək viivákəm;
as'ílytsəm,
uukavék 'avá alyashpétt-tsəm,
siivátum.

37Siivákəm,
'axátt —
'axáttəny atskuunáavək uuvát,
'axátt kwanyíily.
Nyaxáttəny atskuunáavək uuváak.
A'ím,
vathám,
“Tiinyáaməm,
vi'nayémxa,”
a'étəma.
Nyaxáttəny a'ím.

38“'Axóttk.”
'Axáttənyts “'Axóttk,” a'éta.
“'Awétsxa.”

39Nyaatiinyáam nya-áaməm,
xuumárənyts kwaskyíi atháwk,
alytsayóq vuunóonyk vuunóonyk vuunóok,
nyaavíirəm,
nyaavíirəm,
“Vatháts 'anyép aly'tsuuyóqənyts.

40Tsaqwérək vaa'íim viivám,
nyaatók va'tháwk aaly'íim,
aaly'ítsxá,”
a'éta.

41“Xóttk,"
'xáttənyts.

42A'ím,
'xátt tsoqtsóqənyts siiv'áwk.

43Nyaav'áwk,
uutspám,
shóx a'ét.
Nyaayúuny —
ankúpk kwalyvíik uuvám,
nyamaxávək,
nyamuupúuk viiwétsk.

44Pa'iipáa 'ashéntəts uuvám,
nyáany uukanáavək a'ím,
“'Atspáqəts xavíkəm nyaav'óom;
'ashéntəts xamáalyk,
'ashéntəts 'axwéttk awím,
'anyáats av'ayáaxas,
nya'púyəm,
kaxamáaly aváts apúyəm mayúuxa.

45“'Íis,
nya'a'xóttəm,
xóttk nya'thúum,
vatháts xuuvíkəly 'axóttəm,
'atkavék 'aváaxa.”

46Nyaa'íim,
“'Axóttk.
'Ayóovxa,”
nyaa'ítsəm,
vatháts,
'axáttənyts xuumárəny nyaaxavík viiwéts.

47'Amátt nyáava nayémək,
viiwétsk
viiwétsk
viiwétsk,
kwaxatsúurənyts xiipúkəm,
nyáanyəm,
'áw aráa mattiitsóowk,
vanyaawétsk,
naxakyíik.

48Amák kwathíkənyts 'uupílyəny matt-tsapéem,
suuv'óok,
ayúuk siiv'áwk,
suuv'óony,
suuv'óok.
Suuv'óony,
xanapáats mattnyiitsóowəntik
vanyuuv'óookəm,
naxkyíik viiwétsk,
viiwétsk,
viiwéts.

49Vanyaawétsk,
nyamáam,
nyáasi nyaakatánəm,
nyuuv'óok uuv'óok.

50Nyuuv'óook athúm,
shaly'áyts viithíkəntim,
naxkyíintik,
'uupílyəny matt-tsapéesət.
Xanapáats nyáany mattnyiitsóowk,
nyaanaxkyíik siiwétsk
***

51'anyáa kwatspáasily katánəm.
Xaasa'íily kwa'úur uuv'óok suuv'óom,
“Ka'thóm 'anaxkyíik?
'Aavém Kwasáməny a'étəm,
matapúy ma'íim ma'ítyənká?”
a'étəma.
'Axáttənyts a'íim.
Xuumárəny tsakkwék.

52A'éxayəm,
“'Ayáak 'atapúyxa.”

53Nyaa'íim,
“Kamathóm maaxkyéev ma'íim ma'ítyənkáa?
Xaasa'ílyəny,
vuulyéwəny nyiináam
nyammav'áwk.”

54“'Aaxkyéevxa.”

55“Kamathóm mathúu ma'ím ma'ím?”
a'í;
suunóo.

56Siiv'áwxay,
kúur nyaa'íim,
xártsampúk mattiitsóowk.
Shaly'áynyi tsamíim,
pónənənən,
xaasa'íly aaxkyéev.

57Xaasa'íly nyaaxkyéevkəm,
suuv'óom —
'Aavém Kwasám nyaványənyts suuvám —
ayúuk siiv'áw.

58'Uuméeny matt-tsapéek,
'avíinyts 'amáy tan alyvám,
ayúuk viiv'áwk.

59“Kamathóm makúlyxanká?”
a'étəm.

60“Náq ka'íim.
'Awétsxa.
Mashqwíivək!”
“'Axuulyóoyəny nyiináamək'uuv'óok nya'athúuva.
Nyiiny'ávək amántəxa.”

61Uuv'óok vaa' íim,
'amáy tayáamək ayóovək uuv'óom.
Vaa'íim,
xalytótt mattiitsóowk,
líiiip!,
'amáy alykatán.

62***

63Kúp kwalaxúytantum.
Tskwashányəny paaxkyée kwa'átsk viitháwm,
ayóovək suuv'óom;
nyaayúu tsanpéevəm,
takxávək ayúuk siiv'áw.

64Uuvák,
axwíivəm a'ávək athúm,
mattapéek uuváakəm,
páa tsakyíw a'ím.

65Nyuuváats,
'atsaayúu,
xalytótt mattiitsóowətk awím,
ayúuk uuvátk.

66Uuvák,
viitháwk viitháwk,
viitháwxaym,
kaawémtək vuunóom,
ashmáam.

67Ashmáam,
nyaayúuk,
uupúuvək viiwéts.

68'Aavém Kwasámənyts uuvák,
Pa'iipáa asóok vuunóo,

69***

70nyatsasháakəny tavéerək viiyém.

71Pa'iipáanyts tapúy a'ím aváamək,
uuváanym,
nyáany asóok alytakxávək awétk,
asóok alytakxávək awétk,
vuunóom —
matt-tsapéek,
nyatsasháakányts.

72Nyaayúuk siivák,
suuv'óokəm,
nyuuv'óokəm.
xalytótt nyáany mattiitsóowətk athúm,
líiiip a'ím,
máam,
axwíivəm a'ávkəm,
'iipáyk uuváam,
ayúuk uuvá.

73Xuumára kwasuuthíits nyiináam,
viiv'áwk awétk awím,
'aavény tashmátsk,
miipúkəny tatkyéttk aavíirk,
awíik a'étəma.

74Nyaavíirkəm,
“'Anyáats nya'aavíirkəm.”
“Kamawém ammawíim?
Tskwashány muukamnáwxamká?
'Uunéxəny mattapéem,”
a'ím.
Xáttənyts siivány tskuunáav,
nyáasim.
tsaqwérək uuváakitya,
'axáttənyts.

75***

76Nyuuvám,
tskuunáavək a'ím;
“Kaawémk?
Tskwashá kwavatáyəny viimawáak
pa'iipáany maatsuuyóoyxanka?”

77“Nyáanyts athúulya'éməxa.
Nyaayúu kwanymé 'awíim.
'Awíim,
pa'iipáanyənyts uuyóovxa
'Aavém Kwasám 'atapúyəm.”
“Xóttk.”

78Xaym,
iipály aakyéttk vuunóok;
paaxkyéek viitháw 'etəm.

79Viitháwm awim,
axéerək vuunóok,
nyaavíirək,
a'íim,
“Móo,
máam,
'Aavém Kwasám 'atapúyk 'av'áwtk 'athúm.
Iipály 'aatskyéttk va'uunóok,
'aavíirəm,
máany manyíilyqxa,”
a'étəma.
'Axáttəny a'ím.

80“Manyíilyqəm,
'awétsxa.”

81A'ím,
suuv'óom,
kúur a'ím,
“Nyamáam,
'Avém Kwasámts apúyk,”
a'íim.

82Nyatsasháakənyts,
iimák —
sél sél sél sél sél! —
xalakúyk.

83Nyuunóom,
nyaayúukəm,
amáam,
aatspáatsk,
'Aavém Kwasám tapúyk nyaa'íim.

84Xuumárənyts vinathíik,
nyaanakavék vanyaanathíik katánək
'Aréeyəny.
'Aréeyəny nyaanakavék nyaakatánk,
“Makyíts 'Aavém Kwasáməny tapúy?”

85“'Anyáats'atapúyk'av'áwk.”

86“Kaawíts maxwíivək mawépək muuváak ma'íim,”
a'ítsəm.

87Siiv'áwk kuu'éeyk,
xuumár kwxatáləny.

88A'ím,
aatsxwáaar a'ím.

89“Xatál,
xuumár kwxatáləny.
Kaawíts axwíivkəm.
Mawíim muuváak ma'ím!”

90A'ím,
aatsxwáaar a'ítsk suunóotsəm,
siiv'áw kuu'éeyk,
'axóttk athúm.

91Nyaxáttənyts av'áwəm;
“Kayóqəm uuyóom.”

92A'ím,
'axátənyts ayóqxayəm,
'Aavém Kwasám iipályəny nyaayúu nyiitháwəm,
uuyóov.

93Nyaanymáam.
Xuumár kwxatáləny,
nyáanyi amánk 'axóttk athúuk a'étəma.

Translation

94This orphan child was around, they say.
He was a boy.
There he was,
and 'Aréey took him, they say.
He took him as an enemy prisoner.

95***

96He took him, and so,
he put him to work —
and (the boy) was dead tired.
He was going along dead tired, they say.

97There he was,
and 'Aréey said it.
He said to the orphan child,
“Take my blanket,
and wash it
(so that) it’s white,
pure white,
and bring it back inside.”

98'Aréey said it
to the child —
he said it to the orphan.

99He said it,
and when he heard him,
the orphan child,
he took the blanket,
and he went along
to the edge of the ocean.
When he got there he washed it,
he did his best to wash it, poor thing.

100It wasn’t white at all,
and when he saw it,
he stood there crying.
His dog was with him.
His dog was pitch black.
(The boy) kept him as a pet, and there he was,
and he was watching.

101The black dog lay there watching and said,
“Don’t cry.
As for that,
the blanket,
put it face down,
and use the sand,
like this
and like this
and like this
and like this.
Keep doing it,
and then turn it over,
and it will be really white,
perfectly white,
pure white.
(Then) you can take it back in.”

102“All right.”

103So,
he took it,
he went along,
and he gave it to' Aréey.
He gave it to' Aréey,
and he went about spreading the blanket out;
“This is a child I must imprison,
this one.”

104He was an orphan, they say.
But
this child had great powers.

105There he was,
he was acting like an orphan,
and they tied him up and put him away.

106***

107They put him away,
and there he was,
and at that point they got the people together,
and they were going to have a feast.
The people were arriving,
and he was in here (where) they had tied him up.
There he was in the house.

108He was listening,
he was listening, and suddenly,
'Aréey said to the people,
he asked the people,
“Well,
which one of you people in here
is going to kill 'Aavém Kwasám?
Do you think you can kill him?”

109He said it, and suddenly
a person,
one person was among them,
and he went straight off to do it,
(but) it was no use,
and he came back.

110Right away,
another one went, but
it was no use,
he was exhausted from the heat,
and he came back.

111Then,
that orphan child was standing over there,

112and he said to 'Aréey,
“I will go.”

113“You are an incompetent child,
you are not strong enough to do anything,”
he said.

114“I will go,” (the boy) said.
“I will go,
and I will kill 'Aavém Kwasám.
I will bring him back,
and you will see.”

115So,
the people laughed,
they didn’t believe him at all.

116They didn’t believe him, and so,
he heard them laughing at him;
they didn’t let him do it,
they took him back and shut him up in the house,
and there he was.

117There he was,
and the dog —
he was talking to the dog,
the black dog.
He was talking to his dog.
So,
at this (point),
“Tonight,
we will leave,”
he said.
He said it to his dog.

118“All right.”
The dog said, “All right.
We’ll go.”

119When it started getting dark,
the child took a dish,
and he went about spitting into it, on and on and on,
and when he finished,
when he finished,
“This is my spittle.

120It will be here talking like this,
and they will mistakenly think we are still here inside,
they will think so,”
he said.

121“All right,”
the dog (said).

122Saying (that),
the dog stood up.

123He stood up,
and they went out,
they went out swiftly.
That thing —
there was something like a little hole there,
and they went into it,
they went through it and off they went.

124A person was there,
and (the boy) told him,
“There are two flowers standing there;
one is white,
and one is red, and so,
I will go, but
if I die,
you will see this white one die.

125“But,
if we’re all right,
if we’re all right, then,
both of these (flowers) will be all right,
and I will come back.”

126When he said it,
“All right.
We will watch them,”
(the person) said,
and this one,
the dog was with the child and off they went.

127They headed away from this place,
and they went on,
and on,
and on,
and cold weather was the first (problem they encountered ),
and at that (point ),
they turned themselves into a blazing fire,
and they went on,
they went across it.

128What lay beyond it was extremely hot,
and they stood there,
(the boy) stood there watching,
they stood there,
and they stood there.
They stood there, until
this time they changed themselves into ice,
and they stood there,
and they went across it and went on,
and on,
and on.

129They went on,
and finally,
they reached that distant (place),
and they stood there and stood there.

130They stood there, and so,
this time there were sand dunes,
and they crossed these too,
even though it was extremely hot.
They changed themselves into ice,
and they went across and kept going on,

131***

132and in the emerging day they got there.
They stood there at the edge of the ocean, and
“How will we get across?
This so-called 'Aavém Kwasam,
how are you going to kill him?”
he said.
The dog said it.
He asked the child.

133As soon as he said it,
“I’ll go and kill him,” (said the boy).

134Then,
“How are you going to get across?
The ocean
is extremely wide,
from where you are standing.”

135“I’ll get across.”

136“How are you going to do it?”
he said;
there they were.

137(The boy) stood there, and suddenly,
after a little while,
they turned themselves into tiny brown ants.
They were placed on the sand,
and dust rose up in a cloud,
and they crossed the ocean (by tunneling under it).

138They crossed the ocean,
and they stood there —
'Aavém Kwasám’s house was there —
and (the boy) stood there looking.

139It was extraordinarily high,
the rock (where he lived) was at the very top,
and (the boy) stood here looking.

140“How are you going to climb it?”
(the dog) said.

141“Be quiet.
We will go. You’re being noisy!” (the boy said).
“Here we are, (giving off) our distinctive odor.
He will smell us and wake up.”

142They stood there like this,
they stood there looking way up to the top.
They went like this,
they made themselves into spiders,
and up they went (on the spider’s silken thread),
and they got to the top.

143***

144There was a hole going right through.
Those seven heads were there, just as they had said,
and (the boy and the dog) stood there watching;
(the hole) was a small thing,
and he took (the dog) in and stood there watching.

145(The monster) was there,
and he smelled the odor they gave off, and so,
it was pretty strong,
and he felt like biting someone.

146(The boy) was there,
well,
he had turned himself into a spider, and so,
he was watching him.

147There he was,
and they stayed and stayed,
they stayed, and suddenly,
they managed to do something,
and (the monster) went to sleep.

148He went to sleep,
and when they saw this,
they went on in.

149'Aavém Kwasám was there.
He had been eating people,
***
and he had piled up their bones and left.

150People had arrived, intending to kill him,
and there they were,
and he had let those (people) in, in order to eat them, and so,
he had let them in, in order to eat them, and so,
he went on doing this —
and there were a lot of them,
the bones.

151(The boy) saw this,
and they stood there in the distance,
and as they stood there,
they had turned themselves into those spiders, and so,
up they went (on the spider’s silken thread ),
and that’s all,
(the monster) smelled the odor they gave off,
and he came to life and there he was,
and they were watching him.

152The child’s powers were extraordinary,
and he stood there and used them, and so,
he put the snake to sleep,
and he chopped through its necks and finished,
he did, they say.

153When he finished,
“I have finished,” he said.
“How will you manage it?
How will you carry his heads?
They’re terribly heavy,”
(the dog) said.
The dogs that were there could talk,
in those (days),
and he was speaking (to the boy), they say,
the dog (was).

154***

155He sat there,
and (the dog) was talking to him;
“How will it happen?
How will you bring these great big heads
and show them to people?”

156“It won’t be those heads.
I will do something else.
I will do it,
and the people will see
that I have killed 'Aavém Kwasam.”
“All right.”

157Right away,
he went about cutting off the tongues;
there were seven of them, they say.

158There they were, and so,
he went about tying them up,
and when he finished,
he said,
“Okay,
that’s all,
I have killed 'Aavém Kwasám.
I have been cutting off his tongues,
and I have finished,
and you will swallow them,”
he said.
He said it to the dog.

159“You swallow them,
and we will go.”
He said it,
and they stood there,
and in a little while,
“Finally,
'Aavém Kwasám is dead,”
he said.

160The bones,
they danced —
rattle-rattle-rattle-rattle-rattle! —
they were rejoicing.

161(The spirits) were there,
and when they saw it,
at last,
they came out,
when he told them he had killed 'Aavém Kwasam.

162The child (and the dog) came this way,
they came back and arrived
at 'Aréey’s (place).
When they arrived back at'Aréey’s (place),
“Who has killed 'Aavém Kwasám?” (someone said).

163“I killed him,” (said the boy).

164“You are not strong enough to have done it,”
they said.

165He stood there, the poor thing,
the orphan child (did).

166And so,
they laughed.

167“He’s an orphan,
he’s an orphan child.
He is not strong enough.
And you say that you did it!”

168And so,
they were all laughing, over there,
and he stood there, the poor thing,
(but) it was all right.

169His dog stood there;
“Throw up, so they can see them,” (said the boy).

170And so,
the dog threw up, and suddenly
'Aavém Kwasám’s tongues and things were there,
and they saw them.

171That’s all.
As for the orphan child,
from then on he was just fine, they say.

Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée (Seven Heads)

172Told by John Comet

173Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée uu'ítsənyts,
suuváak'eta.
Piipáa 'aláayts.

174Suuvám;
piipáa nyaváyk,
'atáyk nyaváyk siitháwm,
nyuuváak suuváakitya.
Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyéenya.

175Sanyuuváak,
tiinyáam kwashíintənyəm,
nyaayúu tapúyk uuváatk:
'amó awétk,
kaawíts,
nyatsxáatt avkwathík avány,
tapúyk.

176Tiinyáam aváatkəm,
nyáany tapúyk asóok awét.
Awíim uuváak athúuk'eta.

177Uuváam,
piipáa kwanyváyənyts,
uuyóovəsáa,
shtamatháav awíis,
piipáany,
iimáattəny uuyóov alya'émtum.
Shtamatháavəm,
avawétk uuváat.
Tiinyáam nyaashmáts aváak awét.

178“Kaawítstants aváak awíim?”
aaly'íim.
Uuyóovət.

179Taxalyuukwáats vuunóonyk,
uuyóov alya'émk 'eta.

180Sanyuuváak;
“Kaawíts suuváak,
'ayúuxa 'aaly'íim,”
siiyáak,
xalykwáak suuváanyk;
“Kaváarək.
'Ats'ayúulyəm.”

181Matt-tsakakwék athúm;
piipáanyts mattaaéev.
Piipáa nyavány apák,
mattaaéev.
Mattuukanáavəs athót.
“Kaawíts uuváak athóxa maaly'íim?”
a'étəm;
“Áa-áa,
'ashmathíika.”

182Avawíi kwa'átsk uuváatəs,
tiinyáam aváak awét.
Tiinyáam aváak awét,
uuváak awét.
'Ayúusáa,
'uuyóov aly'émtəm,
awétk uuváat.”
A'íikəta.

183A'íim,
matt-tsakakwék.
Piipáa nyavá siitháwət.

184Tiinyáam vaa'íim aváak,
awét.
Vaawét tapúyt.

185Awétk vuunóok awíikitya.
Nyaqwalayéwəm uuyóovət.

186Ayóov,
ayóov;
nyatsuuxáattəny awétk.
Namák alya'émk vuunóot.

187Vuunóom,
siitháwm,
piipáa xatálvəts suuváakitya.
Suuváak.
Shuupóowkitya.
“Kaawíts avuuváatk awítya,”
aaly'íim suuváakəta.
Xuumár kwxatálv'éta.

188Suuváak;
“'Ayúuxa 'aaly'íim,”
suuvát.

189A'ím,
piipáats nyuuváyapatk uuváak,
nyáanyts ayúuxa a'étk,
siiyáak,
uuváat,
nyiirísh 'ét.
Tapúy kamúlyk a'ét.
Nyaakwawítsəny xalykwáatsk,
nyiirísh a'ét.

190Suuváany,
aváts,
xuumárənyts,
siiyáatapatk,
ayúutk,
takavéktək uuváat.
“Kaawíts nyaawíim,
'ayúuxa 'aaly'ét.”

191Nya'ím
nyatiinyáam,
nyaawínyəməshtəka.
Nyaawínyəmáshk,
tapúy.

192Asóok vuunóok,
nyiinamák viiyém.

193Siitháwnyək,
piipáanyts.
“Kaawítstants uuváak awíim 'ityá?”
a'ét.

194“Tiinyáam awétk,
'anyáam awíilyəm,
tiinyáaməm awétk awét.
Awétəm,
'uuyóov aly'émtəm 'itya.”
a'étk;
mattuukanáavək vuunóot.

195Mattaaéevəm'ashk,
mattuukanáavək vuunóot.

196Nyáanyi,
xuumárənyts,
viiyáak ayúutəs —
ayúum:
kaawíts nyaatapúytəm'ashk avathíkəm,
ayúuk siiv'áwkəta.

197Ee'ée,
kaawíts suuváak awét.
Tsakwshány uukyéttk alytáptək,
asóotk awét.

198Áa,
aváanyək,
viiyáantik 'eta.
Xuumárənyts nyaayáantik,
ayúuk awítya!
Ayúut.

199Nyaawíntik,
suuváam,
nyamatspámək ayúukəta.

200Ayúum,
awím,
vaa'íim:
“Piipáa avány,
makyény tuupúy kaa'áamts,” a'éta.
“Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyéenya.
Páa 'aláay.”

201Awétk awíim,
xuumárənyts,
nyáasi,
xatáltək uuváasáa,
nyaayúu uuthúts aspérətk uuváatk,
iimáatt nyaayúu tsáamts aspérətk viiwáatk.
Nyáasi tsáam manyúuvəkəta.
Awét.

202Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée uu'ítsənyts —
'asháakts vaa'íim vathályavíim,
atháwkəm;
aatskyítt 'íikəta.
Tapúy 'ím,
xuumára.

203Tapúy 'ím.
Nyaa xuumár,
nyáalyavíim atháwapatk awím,
mattaatskyíttkəta.

204Mattaatskyíttk
mattaatsxámək vuunóonyək.

205Nyaayúu,
Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée nyasháak nyuuwítsənyts,
alyéshkəta.

206Alyéshtəm,
kwanymé atháwəntikəta.
“'Anymatsaváamúm!” a'íikəta.
Kwanymé atháwtəntík,
awítsəntík,
awítsk viitháwk viitháwk viitháaaaw tanək,
uulyéshəntikəta.

207Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée nyasháakəny uulyéshəntik.
Xavíkəm uulyésh.

208“'Anymatsaváamúm!”
'Ashént atháwəntik athútya.

209Awítsk vuunóonyk vuunóonyk,
mattkaawém alya'ém,
vuunóonyk vuunóooootan,
nyamáam,
nyuulyéshəntík.

210Nyuulyéshk.

211Vuunóok,
uulyéshəny,
nyaatsuumpáp amáam,
Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyéeny miipúk tatkyéttkəta.

212Xuumárənyts.

213Nyáanyá,
xáam vathány uukyéttk —
táq a'ím —
viitápk awítya.

214Nyaatápm,
nyamáam,
apúyk a'íikəta.

215Nyaapúyəm,
xuumárənyts alynyiithúutsk siiv'áwnyək.
“Vathány,
'atapúyk 'anamákxaym,
piipáats suuváak aváak,
‘'Anyáats 'awíim nya'thúuva,’ a'éxa.”
Aaly'íim siiv'áwkitya.
Iiwáaly alynyiithúutsk.

216Nyaav'áwk;
“Iipály avány 'aakyíttk,
'atháwxa,”
'íikəta.

217Iiwáam alynyiithúutsk.
A'ím,
iipályəny aakyíttkəta.
Iipály vaawíim.
Iipáalyəny aakyíttk atháwt.

218A'ím,
aas'úuttk,
vathány nyaavíirək,
atháwk,
ta'úlyk,
viithíikəta.
Aváts apúyk siithík.

219Nyaanamák,
vanyáathíik,
nyaványi aváakəta.
Nyaaváak,
kanáav alya'émkəta,
tuupúya.

220Kanáav alya'émk.

221Póosh nyaxátt-ts siithíkəm,
aqásəm,
aváatkəta.

222Nyaaváam,
iipályəny ashóok nyaavíirkəm,
póoshəny áayəm a'ítya.
“Kanyíilyqəm!”
Anyíilyəqətá,
póoshənyts.

223Anyíilyq.

224Nyamáam,
siithíkəta,
xuumárənyts.
Apátk siithík.

225A'ím,
piipáanyts nyuuváak uuváak,
nyáanyts:
qwalayéwəm siiyáak,
ayúu va'ár kwa'átsk,
viiyáanyk —
apúyk avathíkəta,
nyaayúunyts!

226Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée!

227Apúyk viithíkəm,
kamúly,
nyáanyts awíi kamúly a'étkəm;
'asháak atháwkəm,
aakyítt
aakyítt
aakyítt,
awíikəta.
Iimáatta.

228Awíim.
Iimáatt kwaxwáattəny vathí nyamalúuk,
vathí nyamalúuk awíikəta.
Iimáattnya.

229Ava'íim,
suuváanyək,
takavék viithíikəta.

230Viithíik,
nyaaváak,
“Móo!
Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée'atapúyk!” a'íikəta.
Piipáanyts a'íim.
Kwayúunyənyts.

231'Íis,
xuumárənyts vathík takavék nyaaváak,
viithíktək;
“'Anyáats 'atapúytək 'athúm.”
Aváak viithík;
kanáav alya'émək viithík.

232Saváts awítsəm.
“'Eey!”
'íikəta.

233“Piipáa nyamaayáak muuyóov awítsəm,
maayáak!”
Piipáany apéetk,
avaayáakəta.
'Atáyk iináam.

234Vaayáak,
apámək,
uuyóovəm;
apúy kwa'átsk athúuk 'eta.
Aaíim makyí iisháaly nyaakyéttk,
nyaakyéttk,
nyaakyétt.
Púyk avathíkəta.

235“Ee'é,” a'ím,
“Awíi kwa'áts,
vatháts.”

236Aakavék vaathíik,
nyaványi apák 'eta.
Apák.

237“'Anyáats 'awíim nya'athúuva,”
'íikəta.

238A'íim,
a'ávək siithíkəta,
xuumáranyts.
Avathík.

239A'ím,
“Piipáa makanáavək,
kwanyváy vathány tsáaməly makanáavəm
mattaaéevəm.
'Uuwíts nyáany uuyóov alynayémxa.”
Piipáats siiyáak,
'aváats kanáavək viiwáakəta.

240“Piipáats tapúy!
Piipáa kwa'aláayəny tapúy viithík!

241“Maayáak muuyóov a'ítsəm athúuva!”
a'ítsəm.
Piipáats “Áa,” nyaa'étk,
viiyémk vuunóokəta.

242***

243Siivám,
mattnyaaéevək,
vuunóok,
'atáytank,
nyaatsaamánək saayáak 'eta.
Uuyóov a'ím.

244Nyaayóov;
vaayáak apámək uuyóov.
Apúy kwa'átsk avathík,
a'éta.

245A'ím,
piipáavats awíilyəs awétk,
awíi kamúlyk a'ítsk,
iimáatt nyaakyíttk uunóom,
aaíim 'axwáatt mattapée avathíkəta.

246“Ée!
Awíi kwa'átsk!
Nyaathík!” a'ím 'íikəta.

247Nyaathíi —
“Ée'é,” nyaa'étk,
aakavék vanyaathíik,
'aványi apák,
mattaaéevəkəta.

248'Aványi apák,
mattaaéevək avatháwm,
“Áa-aá,
mawíim,” a'ét.
“Áa,
'awésh,” 'ét.

249A'ím,
nyaa'ávək,
siithíkəta,
xuumárənyts.

250Xuumár amúlya
Xalyiipíitt amúlyk a'éta.
Amúlyənyts.

251Áa,
xuumár kwatapúyətánənyts.

252Siithíkəm,
“Ée'é,
Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée uu'ítsəny athúu kwa'átsk.
Piipáa 'aláayts nyuuváa kwa'áts,
amáam.
'Anyáa 'atapúyəm viithíkitya!”
a'íikəta,
xuumáranyts.

253A'íikəta.
A'étkəm athúm,
piipáa uu'ítsəny'atskuunáts.
“Iipályvətək athúuk athutya,”
a'íikəta.
“A'étəm,
nyaamawétsk,
mayóov
iipályənyts nyiirísh avathíkxa,”
a'íikəta.
Xuumár a'éta.

254A'ítsəm,
“Maayáak,
muuyóovxa,”
nyaa'íntikəta.

255A'ím,
“'Anyáats 'awíim nya'athúuva,”
a'étk uuváa,
piipáa 'ashént —
kwawítsəny,
nyaamák kawítsənyts,
kwaatskyíttənyts.
“'Anyáats'awét av'áar,” a'ét.

256“'Amáttk mayáak muuyóovəly,” a'ítsk,
vanyaayáantik 'ét.
Aakavék.
Xuumárənyts nyiiv'áwk viiyáakəta.
Xalyiipíittənyts.
Kwatapúytanányts.

257Vaayáak apámk awéta.

258Apámk,
awíim,
iiyáany uutáq,
uutsalyáq nyaa'ím,
iipályənyts nyiirísh a'ím!
Akyítt-təm nyiirísh a'íikəta.

259“Mayúukəm?”
uuyóovk vuunóokəta.
“Vatháts,
piipáa lyavíik,
iipályvtək athúukəta.
Vathány iipály nyiirísh a'ét!

260“'Anyáats 'awíim 'athúuvəta!
Sáa
nyammatkavékəm,
nyaatsuuyóoyxa,”
'íikəta.

261Nyaa'íim,
viithíikəta.
Aakavék nyaathíintikəta.

262Vanyaathíik,
'aványi apák.

263Nyaapákəm,
póosh nyaxáttəny aqásk 'eta.

264Póosh aqásəm,
nyaxátt nyaaqásk,
“Kathíik!” a'étəm,
aváakəta.

265Aváam.
“Kayóqəm
uuyóo a'ím!”
Póoshənyts ayóqəta.

266Ayóqəm,
iipályənyts alyavákəta.
“Muuyóov,” 'íikəta.

267“Nyáany
Tsakwshá Kwapaaxkyée iipály athúuva!” 'íikəta.

268“Ée,
avathúu kwa'átsk,” a'íikəta.
“Máany matsanyáayəm ma'éta!”
a'ítskəta.
Piipáa avány a'íts.

269Nyaa'íim,
“Móo,
amáam.
Piipáa uu'its tsanyáayta.
Matapúytəxá,”
a'ítskəta.

270Piipáa kwatáyəny nyiikanátskəta.
“Avány,
tsanyáaytəm apúytk.

271Xalyiipíitt tán tapúy kwa'átsəsh,”
a'ítskəta.

272“Iipály lyavíi kwa'áts.
Nyavám,” a'íikəta.

273“Savány,
matapúytəxa,
tsanyáay a'ítsəm,” nyaa'étk.
“'Axóttk,” nyaa'étk a'ím.

274Piipáa tsuumpákəm
'iipáava nyaatháwk,
viiwáakəta,
kwatsanyáaya.

275Nyaatháwk,
nyaawáak,
nyuukwév iimény axíirək,
nyaavíirək.

276Nyaayúu,
múul yaakapétt siiv'áwm,
nyáany malyaqény axérək vuunóok,
nyaavíirək'íikəta.

277Nyaavíir,
athúm,
múuləny aatsqwíttk,
amáam,
avéshk,
piipáany uunaxwíily,
athúu kathómk athúm.

278Apúyk athúm
uunaxwílyk viiwáa.

279Athúukəta.

280Athúm,
“Móo,
máam,
nyaamawíi kwa'átsk,” 'et.
Nyáasi,
amáam,
nyaayúunyts apúyk,
nyáasəts xalakúyk aaíimk suunóokəta.

281Xaltakóoyk suunóok,
nyáasəts.
'Ats'uumáavəxa,”
a'íikəta.

282Máam,
apúyts amáam,
'atsuumáavxa a'ím.
Xalakúyk viitháwk.

283A'ím,
'atsaamáats kamíim,
awíiyum.
Mattapéem,
piipáa kwatáyənyts uumáav awéta.

284Uumáavək,
amáam,
iiwáanyts 'axótt-tan amaamáam.
Matt-taxmakyépk vaawíim,
suunóokitya.

285Nyamáam.
Piipáa nyaapúyəm,
piipáa kwaláay.

286Awíikəta.

287A'íim,
nyáavəm áamtəka.
Vuunoony.

Translation

288The one called Seven Heads,
he was there, they say.
He was a bad person.

289There he was;
people were living there,
a lot of them were living there,
and there he was, they say.
Seven Heads.

290There he was,
and each night,
he went about killing things:
he did it to sheep,
or whatever,
the domestic animals that were there,
he killed them.

291Night came,
and he killed those (animals) and ate them.
He was doing it, they say.

292There he was,
and the people who lived there,
they watched, but
they didn’t know (what was going on ),
the people,
they didn’t see the bodies.
They didn’t know (what was going on),
and he kept doing it.
At night while they were sleeping he came and did it.

293“What on earth is coming and doing (this)?”
they wondered.
They watched.
They went on searching,
but they didn’t see him, they say.

294There he was;
“Something is there,
I think I might see him,” (someone) said,
and he went along,
he went hunting for him.
“No.
I don’t see anything.”

295They asked each other;
the people had a meeting.
They got to someone’s house,
and they had a meeting.
They told each other about it.
“What do you think is there?”
they said;
“Well,
I don’t know.”

296“He is doing it, just as they said, but
he gets here at night and does it.
He gets here at night and does it,
he hangs around and does it.
We’ve watched, but
we haven’t seen anything,
and he keeps on doing it,”
They said it, they say.

297So,
they asked each other.
There they were in someone’s house.

298He got there at night, like this,
and he did it.
He killed them like this.

299He kept on doing it, they say.
In the morning they looked.

300They looked,
and they looked;
he had done it to their animals.
He kept at it without stopping.

301He kept at it,
and there they were,
and there was an orphan there, they say.
He was there.
He knew (what was going on), they say.
“Something is around here doing this,”
he was thinking, they say.
He was an orphan child, they say.

302There he was;
“I think I will watch,” (he said ),
and there he was.

303So,
(another) person was living there too,
and he said he would watch,
and he went,
and there he was,
(but) there was nothing there.
He pretended he was going to kill him.
He went looking for the one who had done it,
(but) there was nothing there.

304He was there,
and this one,
the child,
he went along too,
and he watched,
and he came back and there he was.
“When he does something,
I think I will see him,” he said.

305Then,
at night,
(the killer) did it again.
He did it again,
he killed (something).

306He went on eating it,
and he left (the remains) there and went off.

307There they were,
the people.
“What on earth can be around (here) doing (this)?”
they said.

308“He does it at night,
he doesn't do it in the daytime,
he does it at night.
He does it,
and we don’t see him,”
they said;
they were telling each other about it.

309They had another meeting,
and they were telling each other about it.

310At that (point),
the child,
he went along and he might have seen it —
he saw it:
once again (the killer) had killed something,
and (the child) stood there looking, they say.

311Yes,
he had been there and done something.
He had cut the head off and thrown it away,
and eaten (the rest).

312Well,
(the child) got there,
he went along again, they say.
The child went along again,
and he saw him!
He saw him.

313He was doing it again,
there he was,
and (the child) came out and saw him, they say.

314He saw him,
and so,
he said this:
“That person
is someone that can never be killed,” he said.
“Seven Heads.
A bad person.”

315He did it, and so,
the child,
over there,
he was an orphan, but
he was strong in the things that he did,
his body and everything were strong.
Over there, he fought everything, they say.
He did.

316The one called Seven Heads —
there was a knife like this,
and he picked it up;
he was going to cut (the child) up, they say.
He was going to kill him,
the child.

317He was going to kill him.
That one, the child,
he picked up (something) similar, and so,
they cut each other up, they say.

318They cut each other up,
they kept on striking each other.

319Well,
the knife that Seven Heads had,
it broke, they say.

320It broke,
and he picked up another one, they say.
“You can’t do it to me!” he said, they say.
He picked up another one,
and they did it again,
they really did it, going on and on and on,
and he broke this one too, they say.

321Seven Heads had broken a knife again.
He had broken two.

322“You can’t do it to me!”
He picked up another one.

323They did it again, going on and on,
and they weren’t able to do anything to each other,
they really went on and on,
and finally,
he broke another.

324He broke it.

325They went on,
and as for breaking (knives),
the fourth (time that it happened), that was all,
he chopped through Seven Heads’s necks, they say.

326The child (did).

327As for that,
he chopped through them on this side —
they were cut clean through —
and he threw (the heads) down here.

328When he threw them down,
that was all,
(the monster) was dead, they say.

329He was dead,
and the child stood there thinking about it.
“As for this,
if I kill him and leave him here,
someone might come along,
and he might say ‘I did this.’”
(The child) stood there thinking, they say.
He thought about it in his heart.

330He stood there;
“I’ll cut off those tongues,
and I’ll take them,”
he said, they say.

331He thought about it in his heart.
And so,
he cut off the tongues, they say.
He did this to the tongues.
He cut off the tongues and took them.

332So,
he wrapped them,
and when he finished this,
he picked them up,
and he carried them,
and he came this way, they say.
And that (monster) lay there dead.

333He left him,
and he came this way,
and he got to his house, they say.
When he got there,
he didn’t tell anyone, they say,
about the killing.

334He didn’t tell anyone.

335His pet cat was there,
and he called it,
and it came, they say.

336It came,
and he finished unwrapping the tongues,
and he gave them to the cat, they say.
“Swallow them!” (he said).
It swallowed them, they say.
the cat (did).

337It swallowed them.

338That’s all,
there he was, they say.
the child.
He lay down and there he was.

339So,
the (other) person was hanging around and hanging around,
and he was the one:
the next day he went along,
he was always looking for him, just as he had said,
and he went along —
and it was lying there dead,
that thing!

340Seven Heads!

341(Seven Heads) was lying there dead,
and (the person) pretended,
he pretended that he was the one who had done it;
he picked up a knife,
and he cut it
and he cut it
and he cut it,
he did (that), they say.
To the body.

342He did it.
He rubbed the blood here on his body,
he rubbed it on here, they say.
On his body.

343He did that,
he went about doing it,
and he came back, they say.

344He came,
and he got there;
“Well!
I have killed Seven Heads!” he said, they say.
The person said it. The one who had seen (the body).

345But,
the child came back here,
and here he was;
“I am the one who killed him.”
He got here and here he was;
he was here and he didn’t tell anyone about it.

346That (other) one did.
“Hey!”
he said, they say.

347“You people go and look,
you go!”
There were a great many people,
and they went, they say.
There were a whole lot of them.

348They went,
and they got there,
and they looked;
he was dead, just as (the person) had said, they say.
Somewhere on his hand he had been cut,
and cut,
and cut.
He was lying there dead, they say.

349“Well,” they said,
“He did it, just as he said he did,
this (person).”

350They came back,
and they got to his house, they say.
They got there.

351“I am the one who did it,”
he said, they say.

352(The person) said it,
and he heard him, they say,
the child (did).
There he was.

353So,
“You tell people,
you tell all these (people) who live here
that they (should) get together.
They should go and see what I did.”
Someone went along,
he went from house to house telling about it, they say.

354“Someone has killed him!
He has killed the bad person!

355“They said for you to go and see!”
they said.
People said, “All right,”
and they went, they say.

356***

357There he was,
and they got together,
and there they were,
there were a lot of them,
and they started from there and went along, they say.
They were going to look.

358They looked;
they went along and got there and looked.
He was lying there dead, just as (the person) had said,
they say.

359So,
this person wished he had done it,
and he pretended to have done it,
he had gone about cutting the (monster’s) body,
and (the monster) had just bled (on him), they say.

360“Yes!
He did it, just as he said he did!
There it is!” they said, they say.

361They came —
“Okay,” they said,
and they came back,
and they got to the house,
and they had a meeting, they say.

362They got to the house,
and they were having a meeting,
“Yes,
you did it,” they said.
“Yes,
I did it,” he said.

363So,
when he heard it,
he was over there, they say,
the child (was).

364As for the child's name,
he was named Xalyiipíitt, they say.
It was his name.

365Yes,
he was the child who had really killed (the monster).

366He was over there,
“Okay,
it was the one called Seven Heads, just as he said.
There was a bad person here, just as he said,
that’s all.
(But) I am the one who killed him, and there he is!”
he said, they say,
the child (did).

367He said it, they say.
He said it, and so,
what he said to the people was a request.
“(Seven Heads) had tongues,”
he said, they say.
“And so,
if you go,
you (will) see
that the tongues are gone,”
he said, they say.
The child said it.

368Then,
“You should go
and see, ”
he said it again, they say.

369And so,
“I am the one who did it,”
he kept saying,
one person —
the one who had done it,
the one who had done it afterwards,
the one who had cut him up.
“I have always been the one who did it,” he said.

370“I wish you would go to the place and see,” (the child) said,
and they went (there) again, they say.
They went back.
The child stood up and went along, they say.
Xalyiipíitt (did).
The one who really had killed (the monster).

371They went along and got there.

372They got there,
and so,
they opened his mouth,
they propped it open,
and there was no tongue!
He had cut it out and there was nothing there, they say.

373“Do you see?” (he said),
and they went on looking, they say.
“This (monster),
he’s like a person,
he is supposed to have a tongue.
This one’s tongue is not there!

374“I am the one who did it!
But
when you go back,
I will show it to you,”
he said, they say.

375Saying this,
he came this way, they say.
They came back too, they say.

376They came this way,
and they got to his house.

377When they got there,
he called his pet cat, they say.

378He called his cat,
he called his pet,
“Come!” he said,
and it got there, they say.

379It got there.
“Throw up,
so that they can see!” (he said).
The cat threw up, they say.

380It threw up,
and the tongues were in there, they say.
“You see them,” he said, they say.

381“Those
are the tongues of Seven Heads!” he said, they say.

382“Yes,
they are, just as he said,” they said, they say.
“You have lied to us!”
they said, they say.
They said it to that (other) person.

383Having said it,
“Well,
that’s all.
That (other) person has lied in what he said.
You will kill him,”
they said, they say.

384They summoned a lot of people, they say.
“This one,
because he lied, he dies.

385“Xalyiipíitt is the one who killed (the monster), just as he said,”
they said, they say.

386“It appears to be tongues, just as he said.
There they are,” they said, they say.

387“That one,
you will kill him,
because he lied,” they said.
“All right,” they said.

388Four people
took the man,
and they brought him along, they say,
the one who had lied.

389They took him,
they brought him along,
and they tied his legs with a rope,
and they finished.

390Well,
there was a crazy mule there,
and they went about tying the rope around its neck,
and they finished, they say.

391They finished,
and so,
they whipped the mule,
and that’s all,
it ran,
and it dragged the person,
and I don’t know what happened.

392He must have died
(as) it dragged him along.

393It happened, they say.

394So,
“Well,
that’s all,
you did it, just as you said,” they said.
Over there,
that’s all,
the creature was dead,
and those (people) just went about rejoicing, they say.

395They were rejoicing,
those (people).
“Let’s have a feast,”
they said, they say.

396That’s all,
his death was over,
and they were going to have a feast.
They were rejoicing.

397So,
they brought food,
and they were going to do it.
There was a lot of it.
and many people ate.

398They ate,
and that’s all,
they were happy, that’s all.
They hugged each other like this,
and there they were, they say.

399That’s all.
The person was dead,
the bad person.

400He did it, they say.

401So,
that’s all.
There they were.

Acheter

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search