Version classiqueVersion mobile
OpenEdition Books

Atlas of Jordan

 | 
Myriam Ababsa

Chapter seven - Jordan’s Rentier Economy

Delayed Decentralization

Myriam Ababsa

Texte intégral

1Decentralization was announced in 2005. Plans allowed for three regions, which were to create their own elected assemblies and regional capitals. Each elected regional council was to consist of ten members, including one appointed by the central government. The intention being that each region manages its own services and decides on a policy to attract businesses.

2However, the project was soon criticised on two fronts: the first being that it would tribalise the structure of government, with tribal sheikhs monopolizing regional councils. The second issue was that the purpose of this policy was to prepare for the integration of a fourth region: the West Bank. Many observers doubt the feasibility of a delegation of powers to regions and governorates, due to a lack of qualified personnel and a lack of democratic culture. Sceptics claim that the best case scenario would be a decentralized Jordan without democracy (Hamarneh 2010).

3Seven years after the announcement of the decentralization programme, the project appears to have been abandoned. The only sector that has begun decentralization is education, particularly in the governorates of Irbid and Ma‘an since 1998. The creation of new schools is carried out in consultation with users, NGOs and the private sector. During the Arab Spring, the decentralization project was brought back to light in order to quieten the democratic aspirations of the population. The need for citizen participation in decision-making processes and for the management of infrastructure and local development projects has become a priority as it appeases demands for democracy. Decentralization is accompanied by a request for the participation of private sector companies in the fight against unemployment and both rural and urban exodus towards the capital.

Figure VII.35 — Jordan territorial divisions (Special Economic Zones, QIZ, GAM, ASEZA).

Figure VII.35 — Jordan territorial divisions (Special Economic Zones, QIZ, GAM, ASEZA).

Figure VII.36 — North Jordan Land Use and Population in 2004.

Figure VII.36 — North Jordan Land Use and Population in 2004.

Figure VII.37 — Center Jordan Land Use and Population in 2004.

Figure VII.37 — Center Jordan Land Use and Population in 2004.

Figure VII.38 —  South Jordan Land Use and Population in 2004.

Figure VII.38 —  South Jordan Land Use and Population in 2004.

Table des illustrations

Titre Figure VII.35 — Jordan territorial divisions (Special Economic Zones, QIZ, GAM, ASEZA).
URL http://books.openedition.org/ifpo/docannexe/image/5032/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 188k
Titre Figure VII.36 — North Jordan Land Use and Population in 2004.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ifpo/docannexe/image/5032/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 188k
Titre Figure VII.37 — Center Jordan Land Use and Population in 2004.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ifpo/docannexe/image/5032/img-3.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 212k
Titre Figure VII.38 —  South Jordan Land Use and Population in 2004.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ifpo/docannexe/image/5032/img-4.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 195k

© Presses de l’Ifpo, 2013

Conditions d’utilisation : http://www.openedition.org/6540