Acknowledgements

1The group of people who have contributed to this book is larger than I expected when I first started working on it. In numerous conversations and encounters, they all helped shape it. All flaws, however, remain my own.

2First and foremost, I would like to thank my thesis advisor Regina F. Bendix, without whom I would have never considered writing this book, let alone staying in academia. I feel truly fortunate to have had her generous support and invaluable insights on my work and on academia at large.

3I am indebted to Don Brenneis for his generous support and expertise that enhanced this book significantly, both with regard to theory and methodology. I thank Charles L. Briggs and Clara Mantini-Briggs for their wonderful hospitality and the numerous conversations that made me more comfortable in viewing myself as a linguistic anthropologist.

4My colleagues in the DFG Research Unit on Cultural Property provided me with assistance, commentary, and advice on numerous occasions. The interdisciplinary work environment was at times challenging, but very effective and stimulating.

5Dorry Noyes is to be thanked for her always sharp comments and for helping me to think about the social dynamics of cultural property; Valdimar Hafstein for his insights on the entanglement of WIPO and UNESCO; Rosemary Coombe, Susan Gal, Anna Tsing and Christoph Bruman for their valuable comments on my Ph.D. project; and my student assistant Verena Pohl for her assistance. The DAAD is thanked for providing me with a fellowship for conducting Ph.D. research and the DFG funded the Research Unit on Cultural Property that this work stems from. Finally, I would like to thank John Bendix for his numerous valuable comments and careful final editing of the full manuscript.