Version classiqueVersion mobile
OpenEdition Books

Past for the Eyes

 | 
Oksana Sarkisova
, 
Péter Apor

About the Authors

Texte intégral

1Péter Apor (b. 1971) is a research fellow at Pasts Inc., Center for Historical Studies at the Central European University. His dissertation on communist representations of history in Hungary was defended at the European University Institute in Florence in 2002. His main research themes include the politics of history and memory, popular culture, and the history of historiography.

2Gabriela Cristea (b. 1980) is a research assistant at the Romanian Peasant Museum, Bucharest. She received her MA degree in Sociology and Social Anthropology from the Central European University. She is editor and host of the Realitatea TV programs “Old customs of Romania” and “Euro-patches in Central and Eastern Europe.” Her research interests are ethnography, urban studies, museography, and the representations of Communism.

3Nevena Daković (b. 1964) is associate professor of Film Theory and Film Studies in the Department of Theory and History at the University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia. Her research focuses on representations of national and multicultural identity in cinema. She is the author of Melodrama is Not a Genre (1995) and Dictionary of Film Theoreticians (2002).

4Petra Dominková (b. 1972) is a lecturer at the Council on International Educational Exchange (CIEE) and teaches at the East and Central European Studies (ECES) program at Charles University, Prague. She is currently enrolled in postgraduate studies at FAMU. Her research interests include Czech and Eastern European cinema, feminist film theory, and film noir.

5Zsolt K. Horváth (b. 1972) is assistant professor in the Department of Theory of Art and Media Studies at Loránd Eötvös University, Budapest. He is finishing a PhD dissertation at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris and at the Atelier Center, ELTE, Budapest. His research interests include the study of collective memory, historical representations in monuments, museums and films.

6Izabella Main (b. 1972) is a lecturer in the Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań. She published on political and religious rituals, monuments and memory. Her research interests include historical anthropology (monuments, memory and space), the social and cultural history of Poland, and religious phenomena in the 20th and 21st centuries.

7James Mark (b. 1972) is a lecturer at the University of Exeter, United Kingdom. His research interests include the social history of Communism and the political and social memory of Communism in post-communist Central and Eastern Europe. His studies have been published in Past and Present, the Historical Journal and Europe-Asia Studies.

8Kacper Pobłocki (b. 1980) is doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology at the Central European University, Budapest. His dissertation project Space, Class and Capitalism in Central Poland traces the Polish “protracted transition” to flexible capitalism (1976–2006). His research focuses on the region surrounding the city of Łódź.

9Simina Radu-Bucurenci (b. 1980) is a doctoral candidate in history at the Central European University, Budapest and research assistant at the Romanian Peasant Museum, Bucharest. Her research interests include the status of documentary images under the Communist regimes of Central and Eastern Europe and the reassessment of the Communist past in these countries.

10István Rév (b. 1951) is Director of the OSA Archivum and professor in the History Department at the Central European University, Budapest. He has taught at the University of Chicago Law School; Jesus College, Oxford; the Political Science Department at Columbia University; the Anthropology Department at Princeton University; and on the History and Literature Program at Harvard University. He is the author of Economic and Social History of Hungary in the Period of “Socialism” (1990) and Retroactive Justice: Prehistories of Postcommunism (2005).

11Oksana Sarkisova (b. 1974) is a research archivist at OSA Archivum and program director of the International Documentary Film Festival Verzio in Budapest. She holds a doctoral degree in History from the Central European University, Budapest. Her publications and research interests pertain to visual anthropology, ethnographic cinema, Russian and Eastern European cinema, and visual culture.

12Alexandru Solomon (b. 1966) is a filmmaker, based in Bucharest. He has written, photographed, and directed several documentaries based on recent history and culture, broadcast on the BBC, Arte, ZDF, and other international channels, and screened at numerous festivals. He is currently producing a film on Radio Free Europe.

13Renáta Uitz (b. 1973) is associate professor of Comparative Constitutional Law in the Legal Studies Department of the Central European University, Budapest. Her research interests include the transition to democracy, problems of transitional justice, the rule of law and constitutionalism in post-authoritarian democracies. Her book Constitutions, Courts and History: Historical Narratives in Constitutional Adjudication was published in 2005.

14Balázs Varga (b. 1970) is a film historian and researcher at the Hungarian National Film Archive. He is co-editor of the film quarterly Metropolis. He is currently finishing his doctoral project Ideologies, Politics and Social Representation in Hungarian Films of the 1950s and 1960s at Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) in Budapest. His research interests include post-World War II European and Hungarian film history.

15Nikolai Vukov (b. 1971) is a research associate at the Institute of Folklore in the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the New Bulgarian University, Sofia. He holds a doctoral degree in anthropology from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and a doctoral degree in history from the Central European University. His research interests include socialist and post-socialist monuments in Central and Eastern Europe, the historical anthropology of death and commemorations, and the politics of memory in 20th century Europe.

© Central European University Press, 2008

Conditions d’utilisation : http://www.openedition.org/6540