Version classiqueVersion mobile

Masterpieces of History

 | 
Svetlana Savranskaya
, 
Thomas Blanton
, 
Vladislav Zubok

Illustrations

Texte intégral

A lighthearted President Mikhail Gorbachev at an undated event with Georgy Shakhnazarov, one of his closest aides and a key figure in the development of perestroika. Shakhnazarov participated in the 1998 Musgrove conference, the transcript of which appears in this volume. (Courtesy of Andrey Morozov, http://amorozov.ru.)

Mikhail Gorbachev (third from left) attends his first Warsaw Treaty Organization meeting as Soviet leader in May 1985. At the session in the Polish capital, bloc leaders (from left) Nicolae Ceauşescu, János Kádár, Gorbachev, Wojciech Jaruzelski, Todor Zhivkov, Erich Honecker and Gustáv Husák agreed to renew the alliance for 20 years, but it would dissolve from within by 1991. (http://www.geocities.com/​wojciech_jaruzelski/​zyciorys4.html)

The final press conference after the Reykjavik summit, October 12, 1986. Seated in front row, from left: Anatoly Chernyaev, Anatoly Dobrynin, Eduard Shevardnadze, Mikhail Gorbachev, Alexander Yakovlev and Sergei Akhromeyev. (Courtesy of Anatoly Chernyaev)

Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev in animated conversation at the Washington summit in December 1987. The summit culminated in the signing of the historic INF treaty, the first to call for an actual reduction in the number of existing nuclear delivery vehicles. (Courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Library)

Ronald Reagan receives a warm Muscovite welcome on the famed Arbat during the Moscow summit in May 1988. (Courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Library)

Mikhail Gorbachev and Alexander Yakovlev on board the Soviet leader’s airplane. Yakovlev, a former chief of ideology for the CPSU, was a prime mover behind glasnost’ and perestroika. (http://www.lebed.com/​2005/​4364-2.jpg)

Mikhail Gorbachev and Margaret Thatcher are joined by their spouses (seated opposite) during a break in talks at 10 Downing Street, April 6, 1989. The two leaders developed a strong bond during the late 1980s, as Gorbachev did with his West German and French counterparts. In the left foreground of this photo is Gorbachev’s foreign policy adviser, Anatoly Chernyaev, who played a central role in the 1998 Musgrove conference. (Courtesy of Anatoly Chernyaev)

The Polish roundtable talks involving the regime, Solidarity and the Church took place at the Namiestnikowski Palace in Warsaw beginning on February 6, 1989. Although the ruling PUWP tried to use the process to control the direction of political developments, the April 4 agreement ultimately helped topple the communist system in Poland, and spurred similar momentous changes elsewhere in Eastern Europe. (http://www.tiger.edu.pl/​aktualnosci/​okragly_stol.jpg)

George Bush and Lech Wałęsa relax in the White House, November 14, 1989. Wałęsa received the Medal of Freedom during the visit but his real goal was to urge Washington to free up millions of dollars in aid for Poland. (Courtesy of the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

The U.S. and Soviet presidents meet on board a U.S. naval vessel off Malta. On the left side of the table are Mikhail Gorbachev, Alexander Yakovlev and Sergei Akhromeyev. On the right side: George Bush and Brent Scowcroft. The summit of December 2–3, 1989, was the last between the superpowers during the Cold War and marked the end of the Bush administration’s policy “pause” over Soviet relations. (Courtesy of the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

James Baker, Brent Scowcroft, Raisa Gorbachev, Anatoly Chernyaev and Mikhail Gorbachev at the Novo-Ogarevo estate outside Moscow after the signing of the START Treaty, August 1991. (Courtesy of Anatoly Chernyaev)

Gorbachev policy adviser Anatoly Chernyaev and U.S. Ambassador Jack Matlock meet face-to-face. Both men made important contributions to their government’s policies in the 1980s—and later at the Musgrove conference in 1998. (Courtesy of Anatoly Chernyaev)

Former U.S. and Soviet officials, accompanied by East European, Russian, American and Canadian scholars, gather to revisit the ground-breaking events of 1989 at the Musgrove conference center, St. Simons Island, Georgia, in May 1998. (Photographer unknown)

Conversation at Musgrove: Georgy Shakhnazarov, Anatoly Chernyaev and Svetlana Savranskaya consult during a break in the conference, May 1998. (Courtesy of Thomas Blanton)

Jack Matlock, Georgy Shakhnazarov, Malcolm Byrne, Douglas MacEachin, and Vladislav Zubok during the Musgrove conference. (Courtesy of Thomas Blanton)

Thomas Blanton and Anatoly Chernyaev celebrate Chernyaev’s agreement to donate his original diaries to the National Security Archive. The inset page from November 10, 1989, notes: “The Berlin Wall has fallen …” (Courtesy of Svetlana Savranskaya)

Table des illustrations

Légende A lighthearted President Mikhail Gorbachev at an undated event with Georgy Shakhnazarov, one of his closest aides and a key figure in the development of perestroika. Shakhnazarov participated in the 1998 Musgrove conference, the transcript of which appears in this volume. (Courtesy of Andrey Morozov, http://amorozov.ru.)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 80k
Légende Mikhail Gorbachev (third from left) attends his first Warsaw Treaty Organization meeting as Soviet leader in May 1985. At the session in the Polish capital, bloc leaders (from left) Nicolae Ceauşescu, János Kádár, Gorbachev, Wojciech Jaruzelski, Todor Zhivkov, Erich Honecker and Gustáv Husák agreed to renew the alliance for 20 years, but it would dissolve from within by 1991. (http://www.geocities.com/​wojciech_jaruzelski/​zyciorys4.html)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 48k
Légende The final press conference after the Reykjavik summit, October 12, 1986. Seated in front row, from left: Anatoly Chernyaev, Anatoly Dobrynin, Eduard Shevardnadze, Mikhail Gorbachev, Alexander Yakovlev and Sergei Akhromeyev. (Courtesy of Anatoly Chernyaev)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-3.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 92k
Légende Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev in animated conversation at the Washington summit in December 1987. The summit culminated in the signing of the historic INF treaty, the first to call for an actual reduction in the number of existing nuclear delivery vehicles. (Courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Library)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-4.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 96k
Légende Ronald Reagan receives a warm Muscovite welcome on the famed Arbat during the Moscow summit in May 1988. (Courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Library)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-5.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 120k
Légende Mikhail Gorbachev and Alexander Yakovlev on board the Soviet leader’s airplane. Yakovlev, a former chief of ideology for the CPSU, was a prime mover behind glasnost’ and perestroika. (http://www.lebed.com/​2005/​4364-2.jpg)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-6.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 52k
Légende Mikhail Gorbachev and Margaret Thatcher are joined by their spouses (seated opposite) during a break in talks at 10 Downing Street, April 6, 1989. The two leaders developed a strong bond during the late 1980s, as Gorbachev did with his West German and French counterparts. In the left foreground of this photo is Gorbachev’s foreign policy adviser, Anatoly Chernyaev, who played a central role in the 1998 Musgrove conference. (Courtesy of Anatoly Chernyaev)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-7.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 112k
Légende The Polish roundtable talks involving the regime, Solidarity and the Church took place at the Namiestnikowski Palace in Warsaw beginning on February 6, 1989. Although the ruling PUWP tried to use the process to control the direction of political developments, the April 4 agreement ultimately helped topple the communist system in Poland, and spurred similar momentous changes elsewhere in Eastern Europe. (http://www.tiger.edu.pl/​aktualnosci/​okragly_stol.jpg)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-8.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 136k
Légende George Bush and Lech Wałęsa relax in the White House, November 14, 1989. Wałęsa received the Medal of Freedom during the visit but his real goal was to urge Washington to free up millions of dollars in aid for Poland. (Courtesy of the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-9.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 120k
Légende The U.S. and Soviet presidents meet on board a U.S. naval vessel off Malta. On the left side of the table are Mikhail Gorbachev, Alexander Yakovlev and Sergei Akhromeyev. On the right side: George Bush and Brent Scowcroft. The summit of December 2–3, 1989, was the last between the superpowers during the Cold War and marked the end of the Bush administration’s policy “pause” over Soviet relations. (Courtesy of the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-10.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 120k
Légende James Baker, Brent Scowcroft, Raisa Gorbachev, Anatoly Chernyaev and Mikhail Gorbachev at the Novo-Ogarevo estate outside Moscow after the signing of the START Treaty, August 1991. (Courtesy of Anatoly Chernyaev)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-11.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 100k
Légende Gorbachev policy adviser Anatoly Chernyaev and U.S. Ambassador Jack Matlock meet face-to-face. Both men made important contributions to their government’s policies in the 1980s—and later at the Musgrove conference in 1998. (Courtesy of Anatoly Chernyaev)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-12.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 92k
Légende Former U.S. and Soviet officials, accompanied by East European, Russian, American and Canadian scholars, gather to revisit the ground-breaking events of 1989 at the Musgrove conference center, St. Simons Island, Georgia, in May 1998. (Photographer unknown)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-13.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 144k
Légende Conversation at Musgrove: Georgy Shakhnazarov, Anatoly Chernyaev and Svetlana Savranskaya consult during a break in the conference, May 1998. (Courtesy of Thomas Blanton)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-14.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 104k
Légende Jack Matlock, Georgy Shakhnazarov, Malcolm Byrne, Douglas MacEachin, and Vladislav Zubok during the Musgrove conference. (Courtesy of Thomas Blanton)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-15.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 140k
Légende Thomas Blanton and Anatoly Chernyaev celebrate Chernyaev’s agreement to donate his original diaries to the National Security Archive. The inset page from November 10, 1989, notes: “The Berlin Wall has fallen …” (Courtesy of Svetlana Savranskaya)
URL http://books.openedition.org/ceup/docannexe/image/2915/img-16.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 825k

© Central European University Press, 2010

Conditions d’utilisation : http://www.openedition.org/6540

Acheter

Volume papier

amazon.fr
Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search