Version classiqueVersion mobile
OpenEdition Books

Céramiques antiques en Lycie (viie s. a.C. - viie s. p.C.)

 | 
Séverine Lemaître

General outlook to the Hellenistic Pottery of Patara with Selected Examples

Gül Işin

Texte intégral

  • 1 Tritsch 1953, 448-450.
  • 2 Five months later from the “Round Table in Poitiers”, during the 2003 excavation season in Patara, (...)
  • 3 Işık 2000, 26-30.

1The Hellenistic pottery of Patara was mostly known with a very well preserved group of material, which was unearthed and brought to the depots of Antalya Museum in 1952 by Dönmez and Tritsch1. The researches at the area was started as a salvage excavation. However the documentations of the study was not sufficient and it was difficult to interpret this homogeneous pottery group with its context until the 2003 excavations in Patara2. The rest of the presented material, are coming from the eastern foot of “Tepecik Hill” excavations, which is called “Tepecik Necropolis” area3. Here in this presentation some of the chosen Hellenistic pottery forms from Patara will be interposed.

1. Plates

1.1. Attic Import Fish Plate (fig. 1)

  • 4 Agora XII, 147-148.
  • 5 Agora XXIX, 148.

2It is known that such kind of plates was first produced in the Classical Period at the end of the 5th century BC4. This shape is represented in Patara with a very few number. This example has a characteristic lustrous black glaze, which is very well known from the Athenian Agora. The resting surface of the plate is slightly beveled and grooved. The whole body and part of the foot is commonly obscured by the rim and the rim meets with the floor at a sharp angle. The early examples were however slightly different in shape. The Patara plate reminiscent of the features of the last quarter of the 4th century fish plates. By the time goes there is a tendency from the flat plates to the deeper one, and as the plate became deeper the rim became smaller so that more of the body is visible when plate is viewed in profile5.

Fig. 1. Attic Import Fish Plate.

No 1, repaired from six pieces, one third of it missing. Nearly vertical overhanging rim. Reserved groove around edge of floor and depression; Inv.: PT/52/53; InP.: A. 586; H: 2,8; Db.: 10,2; Dr.: 16,8; Fabric: Fine reddish yellow (7,5 YR 6/6); Glaze: Lustrous black (Gley 1 2,5).

Parallels: Agora XXIX no 709-710 (325-300 BC); Agora XXIX 146 note 13.

1.2. Attic and Local Rolled Rim Plates (fig. 2)

  • 6 Agora XXIX, 142-145.

3The rolled rim plate form is originally going back to the early 4th century BC and its development continues through the Hellenistic Period. This was the most popular plate in use in Attica throughout the Hellenistic period and in the earlier phases. They are also frequently found as imports elsewhere. The evolution features of the Attic plates are briefly described by Rotroff6.

  • 7 My special thanks to Suzan Katzev, who was very kindly remind me the close connection between the f (...)

4It is very obvious that contrary to the other well known Hellenistic forms from Patara, the examples of the rolled rim plates can not easily be related to Attic or Corinth typology. Although most of the Patara examples dated to the 2nd quarter of the 2nd century BC in respect to the evolution of the Attic plates, they are basically differentiated itself with its size. All of them are smaller than the examples of Agora, and the diameter of the foot is around one-second in stead one-third or two-fifth of the diameter of the rim. Such different kind of proportion is suggested another production center for these examples. Although typologically some analogies can be found with the islands manufactures7, distinction in the fabric causing difficulty to assume an origin. The homogenous structure in the fabric, which is very familiar with some special type of Patara potteries and the figurines from Patara, gives a chance to utter an origin in Patara.

Fig. 2. Rolled Rim Plates.

No 2; repaired from 5 pieces, some missing fragments at the rim; InP.: PTR 90/12; H: 3,2; Db.: 7; Dr.: 17,3; Fabric: Reddish yellow (7,5 YR 7/6); Glaze: Partly missing Black (Gley 1 2,5), reddish brown at the floor, unglazed resting surface and underneath.

Parallels: Agora XXIX, no 678-681, 680-685 (160-140/110 BC); Corinth VII, no 101-106.

1.3. Rolled Rim Plate with Cyma Profile (incised/stamped decoration) (fig. 3)

  • 8 Agora XXIX, 45.
  • 9 For the decoration see: Drougou 1991, 55; Agora XII, 147; Agora XXIX, no 1057 (350 BC); PF 2, 33-34 (...)

5It has very well shiny black glaze, its form and decoration definitely presents the features of the Athenian samples8. Especially the grooved resting surface with the nippled underside and cyma profile of the plate confirms this notice at least for the shape. Same similarities emerge in the decoration as well9. The Patara example was used as a service plate, with its 18 cm diameter is somewhat larger than the earlier plates in Agora. It has 6 linked palmettes within rouletting in the tondo. Such linked or alternatively linked palmettes within rouletting were the basic design since the late 4th century. Although the 4 palmettes were the standard for the late 4th century, the favorite number became 6 in the early 3rd century. Regarding to its form and decoration the plate should be dated around 300 BC.

Fig. 3. Rolled Rim Plate with Cyma Profile.

No 3, Intact; Inv.: PT/52/47; InP.: A. 580; H: 2,9; Db.: 12 Dr.: 17,9 Fabric: Fine, yellowish red (5 YR 5/6); Glaze: Very dark gray (Gley 1 3/).

Parallels: Agora XXIX, 45 no 632, fig. 46 pl. 60, 142 (325-300 BC); Kotitsa 1998 14, no 11; Agora XII, 147 no 1057 (350 BC); For the decoration see: Agora XXIX, no 869 (300 BC); Drougou 1991, 55 (325-300 BC); PF 2, 33-34 pl. 1 C1; FiE IX/2/2, 1991, 30 pl. 16 no A 77; Samos XIV, fig. 244 D, E.

1.4. Outturned Rim Plate with Stamped Decoration (fig. 4)

  • 10 Agora XXIX, 158-159, no 923 fig. 60, no 938 pl. 73; Braun 1970, 153, no 166 a, c, d, pl. 68, 4; Met (...)

6In the Hellenistic Period, this form begins to occur in many different sites at the same time and their general trend of development is parallel to Athens.10 The Attic imports observed generally in the early Hellenistic pieces. The only example from Tepecik Necropolis has a flaring ring foot, broad flat resting surface and a flat underside. The diameter of the foot is half of the rim. It has curved profile and metallic brownish-black glaze at the outside. Inside it has black with red stacking circle and four stamped palmettes on red glazed floor. Although combined color glazing was popular particularly in the first half of the 3rd century, it is not unusual till to the end of the century. The Patara example is dated with its profile and decoration to the end of the 3rd century BC.

Fig. 4. Outturned Rim Plate with Stamped Decoration.

No 4, repaired from 10 pieces some parts of the rim and floor missing; Inv.: InP.: PTR 90/10; H: 3,2; Db.: 6,7 Dr.: 14; Fabric: Reddish yellow (7,5 YR 7/6); Glaze: Very thin black, mostly pealed.

Parallels: Agora XXIX, no 923 (225-175 B. C); Braun 1970, 153 no 166 a, c, d, Fig. 16 pl. 68, 4; Metzger 1990, 44-48 pl. 8 no 124, 126, 129; FiE IX/2/2, 26, pl. 6 no A 25; Eiring 2001, 102 Fig 3.5 e (175-150 B. C).

2. Bowls

2.1. Echinus Bowls (fig. 5-6)

  • 11 Agora XXIX, 161.

7One of the most popular shapes of the Hellenistic vase typology is echinus bowl. Deep and shallow forms are the main types these bowls. “Deep echinus bowls” came commonly into use in the last quarter of the 4th century in Athens and in Corinth. However they became popular in the 3rd century in whole Hellenistic world11.

8Beginning from the last quarter of the 4th century Patara presents the Athenian import examples of Deep echinus bowls. Afterwards non-Athenian, local or import products came into light in Patara. The earliest example on the basis of the Agora types is known from Patara again from the Tepecik Acropolis area and it is dated around 300 BC. Another example, which has a later date is little smaller and deeper than the other. On the basis of its typology it is better to be named as salt-cellar. This form is very popular in the 4th century in the Agora, but survived into the Hellenistic period. 4th century examples have grooved resting surface. Beginning around 300 BC as in this example the groove was omitted. After 275 the profile is curved, the wall thin, the lip less sharp and the underside either pointed or convex. According to these dating criteria our example is dated to the second quarter of the 3rd century BC.

Fig. 5. Echinus Bowl.

No 5, intact; Inv.: PT/52 647; InP.: A. 590; H: 3,9; Db.: 3,3; Dr.: 6,2; Fabric: Light brown (7,5 YR 6/4) Glaze: Very dark gray (2,5 Y 3/1).

Parallels: Agora XXIX, 167 no 1086 fig. 65 (275-250 BC).

  • 12 Agora XXIX, 16l-162.

9Shallow echinus bowl type is known from Athens since around 300 BC. According to Rotroff 250 BC should be the terminal date of production12. Despite they are little smaller in size, Patara examples are closely related to the Agora examples. Besides the profile and fabric features, the characteristic of the black thin glaze of Agora bowls are observed also on Patara examples. One typically Attic import bowl is dated to the beginning of the 3rd century BC.

Fig. 6. Echinus Bowl.

No 6, repaired from 5 pieces, missing at the wall and rim; Inv.: PT/52/63; InP.: A. 596; H: 3,5 Db.: 6,4; Dr.: 11,3; Fabric: Reddish yellow (5 YR 6/6); Glaze: Outside of the rim very dark gray (Glay 1 3/), underneath and inside red (2,5 YR 4/8), resting surface partly red.

Parallels: Agora XXIX, no 983 (310-300 BC).

3. Gutti

3.1. Askos Type Guttus (fig. 7)

  • 13 Agora XXIX, no 1140.
  • 14 Monaco 1997, 228.

10Up to now this shape was only found at Patara in Tepecik area. This askos type guttus typology has classical form of the shape. Their low ring foot with broad resting surface and baggy body with maximum diameter towards the foot clarifies this assumption. It is easy to find the parallels from the Athens Agora13 and the Aegean Islands like Lemnos.14 Patara examples have almost same fabric and the glaze with the Agora examples.

  • 15 Agora XII, 160; Agora XXIX, 172-173.
  • 16 Monaco 1997, 228.

11As the shape develops, the foot becomes smaller and higher, the body higher and narrower, the body lengthening with an ever more flaring rim above.15 In the course of time, during the Hellenistic Period the profile of the body becomes angular and the ring foot changes its place with a raised disk.16 The Attic import Patara example present a date within the last quarter of the 4th century BC.

Fig. 7. Askos Type Guttus.

No 7, intact; Inv.: PT 52/40 630; InP.: A. 573; H: 10; Db.: 6,2; Dr.: 3,6; Fabric: Reddish yellow (5 YR 7/6); Glaze: Black (Gley 1 2,5).

Parallels: Monaco 1997, 228 pl. 146-148 (325-300 BC); Agora XII, 319 no 1196 fig. 11 pl. 39 (320 BC); Agora XXIX, 172-173 no 1140 fig. 71 pl. 83 (325-300 BC).

4. Kantharoi

4.1. Plain Rimmed Kantharos (fig. 8)

  • 17 Işık 2000, 72 fig. 59.
  • 18 See note 2.

12The plain rimmed kanthoroi were most characteristic form of the Early Hellenistic period in kanthoros typology. This form was known Patara from the Dönmez and Tritsch rescue excavation only with two examples.17 However 2003 excavations presented us at least 10 more examples which are very different in glaze and fabric.18 Patara examples are mostly around 10 cm in height and sitting on a low stem. The lower body is plump and rounded and the upper wall is slightly concave in profile and about equal in height to the lower body. The handle spurs are slightly horizontal. In consequence of its typological features this example can be dated to the last quarter of the 4th century BC. This dating criterion is also supported by securely dated material of Kerameikos excavations from Agora. They are not only with their typological features, but with their fabric and glaze as well originated to Athens.

Fig. 8. Plain Rimmed Kantharos.

No 8, intact; Inv.: PT52 627; InP.: A. 570; H: 10,5 Db.: 4,3; Dr.: 7,4-14,7; Fabric: Pink (7,5 YR 7/4); Glaze: Variegated from very dark gray (Gley 1/3) on the upper body to the red (7,5 YR 3/1) on the bellower part of the body and the foot.

Parallels: Agora XII, 286-287 no 710 (325-300 BC), 712 (310-290 BC) pl. 29; Agora XXIX, 83-85 no 1-11; Kotitsa 1988, 5-6 fig. 1 pl. 2-2.

5. Cups

5.1. Carinated Cups with-formed Handle (fig. 9)

  • 19 Wright 1980, 171 pp.; Agora XXIX, 233-234; Kögler 1996, 64; Doksanaltı 2003, 27-28; For their trade (...)
  • 20 Benghazi III/1 126-127, 170-171;

13These two handelled bowls with carinated profiles are very well known in the Agean and in the area of south west Asia Minor.19 It was originally located to Knidos by P. Kenrick in 1985, because of the similarity of the fabric to that of Knidian Lamps and other Hellenistic ceramic from the site20. The Knidian fabric is distinguished with its rigidity and clean breake. The cups are dip glazed with a thin matt glaze covering the interior and the upper part of the exterior. The colour of the glaze ranging from gray to brown or gray to orange, they are commonly known as in the group of “Knidian Gray

Fig. 9. Carinated Cups with Π-formed Handle.

  • 21 Agora V, 27 G 51; Agora XXIX, 233-234; Doksanaltı 2003, 27-28.

14Ware”.21 The presented example from Patara has a thin matt orange glaze. Such glaze is identical with same kind of findings from Ephesos and Knidos.

  • 22 Tarsus I 72 no 81 fig. 122: A.
  • 23 Doksanaltı 2000, 75-82; Agora V, 13-14 pl. 1,5,39,64.

15Although the earliest example of this typology is known from Tarsus in the early 2nd century BC, typological developing can be observed in Knidos dating from the middle of the 2nd century BC till to the end of the 2nd century A. D.22 By the time goes the shape becomes narrower and deeper.23 In the Hellenistic exampels while the upper part of the body is lower than the underside, the proportions are either equilized or upper part becomes higher in the Roman Period. According to this observation the example from Patara should be dated to the beginnig of the 1st centuy BC.

No 9, one handle and a piece from the rim missing: InP.: PTR 91/depo 2; H: 7,1; Db.: 6,3; Dr.: 16,2; Fabric: Brown 7,5 YR 574; Slip: Light red to orange, inside and outside.

Parallels: Agora XXIX, 233-234 no 1576 fig. 96, 1578 fig. 96 pl. 124 (Context of 115-86 BC), 1579 Pl. 124, 148 (Context of 110-75 BC); Agora V, 28 G51 (1st century BC); FiE VIII, 3, 26-85, pl. 2 no 18 (1st century BC); Zapheiropoulou & Chatzedakes 1994, 247 pl. 194; FiE IX, 3, 27, K 26-35.

5.2. Cups with Stamped Decoration (fig. 10)

  • 24 Doksanaltı 2003, 27-29 pl. XXVIII 1-4; Kögler 1996, 61-64 pl. 20, 1-4.
  • 25 Schmalz 1994, 221 no 56.

16The fragmentary examples from Patara does not give an idea about the entire form of these cups, however on the basis of some other examples, which has been found from Knidos and the Athens Agora, such stamped cups have also been examined in the type of “Knidian ∏-formed” handelled cups. The decoration, which is placed on the floor of the cup, has been designed in two ways. It is either consisting of four palmettes, or alternatingly palmettes and frogs. Both of them are observed in Patara. The palmette stamped one is known from Athens, the other one is known from Knidos on the floor of the Knidian Π formed handelled cups.24 Another center where the frog and palmettes decoration was found, is Caunos.25 Up to now the known examples are all in gray ware and the fabric is akin to Knidos. However, in Patara there are some other fragmentary stamped bases with palmettes or frogs decorated, which was produced in red ware as well. These examples are generally dated to the middle of the 1st century BC.

Fig. 10. Cup with Stamped Decoration.

No 10, a fragmentary piece from the floor with its foot, frogs and palmettes alternating placed on the floor; InP.: PTR 89/L19; PH: 3,6; Est. Db.: 6,5 Fabric: Brown (7,5 YR 5/4); Glaze: Dull gray, orange in places.

Parallels: Agora XXIX no 1579 pl. 124, 148 (Context of 110-75 BC); Müller-Wiener 1985, 47 fig. 31; Schmalz 1994, 221 no 56 (2nd half of the 1st century A. D.); FiE VIII, 3, no 32 (Late Hellenistic-Augustian Period); FiE IX I2/2 A63.

Bibliographie

Abbreviations used in the catalogue

Inv

Inventory number of Antalya Museum

InP

Inventory number of Patara Excavation

PTR

Patara

Nek.

Necropolis

TN

Tepecik Necropolis

N.:

Niveau

H.

Height to rim

P.H.

Preserved height

D

Diameter at largest point

Db.

Diameter of base

Est.

Estimated

Dr.

Diameter of rim

D/H

Ratio of diameter to height

Th.

Thickness

Bibliography

Abadie-Reynal, C., éd. (2003): Les Céramiques en Anatolie aux Epoques hellénistique et romaine. Actes de la Table Ronde d’Istanbul, 22-24 mai 1996, Varia Anatolica XV, Paris Braun, K. (1970): “Der Dipylon Brunnen B1: Die Funde”, AM, 85, 129-269.

Chatzedakes, P. (1997): “Κτιριο νοτια του Ιερου τον Προμαχωνος. Μια taberna vinaria στη Δηλο”, in: Δ‛ΕΠΙΣΤΗΜΟΝΙΚΗ ΣΥΝΑΝΤΗΣΗ ΓΙΑ ΤΗΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΣΙΚΗ ΚΕΠΑΜΙΚΗ, März 1994, Mytilène, 291-307.

Coldstream, J. N., L. J. Eiring et G Forster (2001): Knossos Pottery Handbook Greek and Roman Period, BSA 7.

Doksanaltı, E. (2000): “Die Keramikfunde aus den Arealen Z1 und Y1 der Dionysos-Stoa in Knidos,” RCRF 36, Abingdon, 75-82.
— (2003): “Knidos-Kap Krio Hellenistik Sarnıç Buluntuları”, in: Abadie-Reynal, éd. 2003, 27-33.

Drougou, S., éd. (1991): Hellenistic Pottery from Macedonia, Thessalonique.

Edwards, G. R. (1975): Corinthian Hellenistic Pottery, Corinth VII, Princeton.

Goldman, H., éd. (1950): The Hellenistic and Roman Periods (Excavations at Gözlükule), Tarsus I, Princeton.

Hayes, J. W. (1991): Paphos. The Hellenistic and Roman Potter, Paphos III, Nicosie.

Herford-Koch, M., U. Mandel et U. Schädler, éd. (1996): Hellenistische und kaiserzeitlichle Keramik des östlichen Mittelmeergebietes, Kolloguium Frankfurt 24-25 April 1995, Francfort/Main.

Işık, F. (1990): “Patara 1989”, KazıSonuçları Toplantısı 12,Ankara, 31-32.
— (2000):
Patara, The History and Ruins of the Capital City of Lycian League, Antalya.

Katzev, M. L. (1974): “Preservation and Reconstruction of the Kyrenia Ship”, ILN, June 1974, 69-72.

Katzev, M. L. et S. W. Katzev (1986): “Kyrenia II”, INA Newsletter 13-3, 3-12.

Kenrick, P. M. (1985): The Fine Pottery (Excavation at Sidi Khrebish, Benghazi [Berenice] III, I, Libya Antiqua Suppl. 5, Tripoli.

Kögler, P. (1996): “Trinkschalen mit Pi-Förmigen Henkeln”, in: Herford-Koch, éd. et al. 1996, 64.

Kotitsa, Z. A. (1998): Hellenistische Keramik im Martin von Wagner Museum der Universität Würzburg, Wurzbourg.

Lang-Auinger, C. (1996): Hanghaus 1 in Ephesos. Der Baubefund, Forschungen in Ephesos VIII/3, Vienne.

Meriç, R. (2002): Späthellenistisch-römische Keramik und Kleinfunde aus einem Schachtbrunnen am Staatsmarkt in Ephesos, Forschungen in Ephesos IX/3, Vienne.

Metzger, I. R. (1990): “Die Keramik aus der Zerstörungsschicht des Mosaikenhauses in Eretria”, Lev. 8, Rhodes, 44-48.

Mitsopoulos-Leon, V. (1991): Die Basilika am Staatsmarkt in Ephesos Kleinfunde, 1. Teil: Keramik helleistischer und römischer Zeit, Forschungen in Ephesos IX 2/2, Vienne.

Monaco, M. Ch. (1997): “Askoi Tipo Gutti”, in: Pogessi et al. 1997, 220-231, pl. 139-150.

Müller-Wiener, W. (1985): “Milet 1983-4”, Ist. Mitt. 35.

Outschar, U (1996): “Dokumentation examplarisch ausgewählter keramischer Fund-komplexe” in: Lang-Auinger 1996, Vienne, 27-85.

Pogessi, G., S. Savona, M. Ch. Monaco et M. C. Monaco (1997): “Un deposito di ceramiche tardoclassiche ed hellenistishe del Cabirio di Lemno: Analisi delle forme”, in: Δ‛ ΕΠΙΣΤΗΜΟΝΙΚΗ ΣΥΝΑΝΤΗΣΗ ΓΙΑ ΤΗΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΣΙΚΗ ΚΕΠΑΜΙΚΗ, March 1994, Mytilène.

Robinson, H. S. (1959): Pottery of the Roman Period, The Athenian Agora V, Princeton.

Rotroff, S. I. (1997): Hellenistic Pottery. Athenian and Imported Wheelmade Table Ware and Related Material, The Athenian Agora XXIX, Princeton.

Schäfer, J. (1968): Hellenistische Keramik aus Pergamon, PF 2.

Schmalz, B. (1994): Kaunos 1988-1991, AA, 221.

Sparkes, B. A. et T. Talcott (1970): Black and Plain Pottery of the 6th, 5th and 4th Centuries BC, The Athenian Agora XII, Princeton.

Tölle-Kastenbein, R. (1974): Das Kastro Tigani. Die Bauten und Funde griechischer, römischer und byzantinischer Zeit, Samos XIV, Abb. 244, D, E.

Tritsch, F. J. et A. Dönmez (1953): “Finding a Colossal Head of Apollo and Other Discoveries in the Ancien Cities of Lycia”, ILN 21st March, 448-449.

Zapheiropoulou, F. et P. Chatzedakes (1994): “Δηλος - Κεραμικη απο τον δρομο βορεια του Ανδηρου των Λεοντων”, in: ΓΕΠΙΣΤΗΜΟΝΙΚΗ ΣΥΝΑΝΤΗΣΗ ΓΙΑ ΤΗΝ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΣΤΙΚΗ ΚΕΡΑΜΕΙΚΗ, 24-27 September 1991, Thessalonique, 235-274, pl. 181-203.

Notes

1 Tritsch 1953, 448-450.

2 Five months later from the “Round Table in Poitiers”, during the 2003 excavation season in Patara, with the aim of understanding the architectural context of this group of pottery, the area, where Tritsch and Dönmez excavated in 1952, was rediscovered. Although the excavation didn’t finish in 2003 season, the results were so interesting. According to the initial notifications the pottery group, which was found in 1952 was the filling material of a Late Classic/Early Hellenistic cistern. The preliminary report of this study will be presented in “Kazı Sonuçları Toplantısı in Ankara in 2004”.

3 Işık 2000, 26-30.

4 Agora XII, 147-148.

5 Agora XXIX, 148.

6 Agora XXIX, 142-145.

7 My special thanks to Suzan Katzev, who was very kindly remind me the close connection between the forms of the pottery finds of Kyrenia II shipwreck. On the basis to the chemical analysis however, the crew’s crockery of Kyrenia II originated to Rhodes. See, Katzev 1974; Katzev & Katzev 1986.

8 Agora XXIX, 45.

9 For the decoration see: Drougou 1991, 55; Agora XII, 147; Agora XXIX, no 1057 (350 BC); PF 2, 33-34, pl. 1 C1; FiE IX/2/2 1991, 30 Pl 16, no A 77; Samos XIV, fig. 244 D, E.

10 Agora XXIX, 158-159, no 923 fig. 60, no 938 pl. 73; Braun 1970, 153, no 166 a, c, d, pl. 68, 4; Metzger 1990, 44-48, no 124, 126, 129, 133; FiE IX 2/2 1991, 26, no. A 25, pl. 6; Eiring 2001, 102, figs, 3, 5 e.

11 Agora XXIX, 161.

12 Agora XXIX, 16l-162.

13 Agora XXIX, no 1140.

14 Monaco 1997, 228.

15 Agora XII, 160; Agora XXIX, 172-173.

16 Monaco 1997, 228.

17 Işık 2000, 72 fig. 59.

18 See note 2.

19 Wright 1980, 171 pp.; Agora XXIX, 233-234; Kögler 1996, 64; Doksanaltı 2003, 27-28; For their trade and distribution in Mediterranean see, Hayes 2000, 291-294.

20 Benghazi III/1 126-127, 170-171;

21 Agora V, 27 G 51; Agora XXIX, 233-234; Doksanaltı 2003, 27-28.

22 Tarsus I 72 no 81 fig. 122: A.

23 Doksanaltı 2000, 75-82; Agora V, 13-14 pl. 1,5,39,64.

24 Doksanaltı 2003, 27-29 pl. XXVIII 1-4; Kögler 1996, 61-64 pl. 20, 1-4.

25 Schmalz 1994, 221 no 56.

Table des illustrations

Légende Fig. 1. Attic Import Fish Plate.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ausonius/docannexe/image/828/img-1.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 32k
Légende Fig. 2. Rolled Rim Plates.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ausonius/docannexe/image/828/img-2.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 32k
Légende Fig. 3. Rolled Rim Plate with Cyma Profile.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ausonius/docannexe/image/828/img-3.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 32k
Légende Fig. 4. Outturned Rim Plate with Stamped Decoration.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ausonius/docannexe/image/828/img-4.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 48k
Légende Fig. 5. Echinus Bowl.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ausonius/docannexe/image/828/img-5.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 28k
Légende Fig. 6. Echinus Bowl.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ausonius/docannexe/image/828/img-6.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 32k
Légende Fig. 7. Askos Type Guttus.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ausonius/docannexe/image/828/img-7.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 48k
Légende Fig. 8. Plain Rimmed Kantharos.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ausonius/docannexe/image/828/img-8.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 56k
Légende Fig. 9. Carinated Cups with Π-formed Handle.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ausonius/docannexe/image/828/img-9.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 60k
Légende Fig. 10. Cup with Stamped Decoration.
URL http://books.openedition.org/ausonius/docannexe/image/828/img-10.jpg
Fichier image/jpeg, 69k

© Ausonius Éditions, 2007

Conditions d’utilisation : http://www.openedition.org/6540