Version classiqueVersion mobile

EVALITA Evaluation of NLP and Speech Tools for Italian

 | 
Tommaso Caselli
, 
Nicole Novielli
, 
Viviana Patti
, 
et al.

Part II. Participant reports

Detecting Hate Speech Against Women in English Tweets

Resham Ahluwalia, Himani Soni, Edward Callow, Anderson Nascimento et Martine De Cock

Résumé

Hate speech is prevalent in social media platforms. Systems that can automatically detect offensive content are of great value to assist human curators with removal of hateful language. In this paper, we present machine learning models developed at UW Tacoma for detection of misogyny, i.e. hate speech against women, in English tweets, and the results obtained with these models in the shared task for Automatic Misogyny Identification (AMI) at EVALITA2018.

Les formats HTML, PDF et ePub de cet ouvrage sont accessibles aux usagers des bibliothèques et institutions qui l'ont acquis dans le cadre de l'offre OpenEdition Freemium for Books. L’ouvrage pourra également être acheté sur les sites des libraires partenaires, aux formats PDF et ePub, si l’éditeur a fait le choix de cette diffusion commerciale. Si l’édition papier est disponible, des liens vers les librairies sont proposés sur cette page.

Extrait du texte

1 Introduction

Inappropriate user generated content is of great concern to social media platforms. Although social media sites such as Twitter generally prohibit hate speech1, it thrives online due to lack of accountability and insufficient supervision. Although social media companies hire employees to moderate content (Gershgorn and Murphy, 2017), the number of social media posts exceeds the capacity of humans to monitor without the assistance of automated detection systems.

In this paper, we focus on the automatic detection of misogyny, i.e. hate speech against women, in tweets that are written in English. We present machine learning (ML) models trained for the tasks posed in the competition for Automatic Misogyny Identification (AMI) at EVALITA2018 (Fersini et al., 2018b). Within this competition, Task A was the binary classification problem of labeling a tweet as misogynous or not. As becomes clear from Table 1, Task B consisted of two parts: the multiclass classification problem ...

Auteurs

School of Engineering and Technology, University of Washington Tacoma – resh[at]uw.edu

School of Engineering and Technology, University of Washington Tacoma – himanis7[at]uw.edu

School of Engineering and Technology, University of Washington Tacoma – ecallow[at]uw.edu

School of Engineering and Technology, University of Washington Tacoma – andclay[at]uw.edu

School of Engineering and Technology, University of Washington Tacoma – mdecock[at]uw.edu

Acheter

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search