Version classiqueVersion mobile
OpenEdition Books

White Paper — Open Science in a Digital Republic — Strategic Guide

 | 
Scientific and Technical Information Department - CNRS

Proposals for applying the act

Defining standards

Texte intégral

A reference framework for interoperability specific to Open Science

1To enable communication between different data and networks, methodologies and standards should be drawn up to ensure interoperability between the data produced by any field of science.

2The network of curator entities must create a set of data repositories that are interoperable and speak the same language.

3Similarly to the Référentiel Général d’Interopérabilité (General Interoperability Framework) or RGI, Open Science could acquire a standard to promote interoperability between digital data curation entities (version 2.0 of the RGI was officially promulgated by the Order of 20 April 2016, published in the Journal officiel de la République française (JORF) No. 0095 of 22 April 2016).

4The RGI is a framework of recommendations referencing norms and standards that promote interoperability within the information systems of government bodies. These recommendations set out the objectives to be achieved to promote interoperability. They allow actors seeking to interact and therefore to develop the interoperability of their information systems to go beyond simple bilateral arrangements.

5The RGI is defined in Order No. 2005-1516 of 8 December 2005 concerning electronic exchanges between users and government bodies and between government bodies. In Article 11 of this order, the “RGI lays down the technical rules to ensure the interoperability of information systems. In particular, it specifies which data directories, norms and standards must be used by government bodies.”

Certification or accreditation procedure

6A procedure for the certification or accreditation of digital data curation entities could be defined.

7This procedure for assessing digital data curation entities should ensure that they abide by their obligations, in particular as regards:

  • data security;

  • compliance with standards and data formats;

  • compliance with obligations relating to technical infrastructures and those forming networks (maintenance of platforms for the collection and provision of data, maintenance of hubs for network management);

  • provision of good behaviour guides and an Ethics Charter.

© OpenEdition Press, 2017

Conditions d’utilisation : http://www.openedition.org/6540

Lire

Open access

Acheter