Version classiqueVersion mobile
OpenEdition Books

Creative Commons: a user guide

 | 
Simone Aliprandi

Appendix IV. A CC REL guide

Texte intégral

Foreward

1This resource assumes some basic knowledge of HTML and RDFa. Many of the later examples build on ideas from previous examples. If there is something in an example that isn't explained, check previous examples for an explanation.

2Validating your RDFa can help you catch syntax errors or other problems with your metadata. For more information on RDFa validation, see the How-tovalidate page29 on the RDFa wiki.

3This resource contains material adapted from “ccREL: The Creative Commons Rights Expression Language”30 by Creative Commons, which is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Basic Marking: One page, One License

4A very common use of Creative Commons licenses is to license a page on the web and the content contained within under a CC license. For example, many blogs are licensed under a Creative Commons license. It's common for these sites to include CC license information at the bottom of every page in a footer, similar to how people often include copyright ownership year and information at the end of a page.

5Below are examples of how you would indicate that a single page on the web is licensed under CC. This is useful when integrating a CC license mark into a footer of a website.

License metadata

6This page, by <a
href=http://lessig.org/​>Lawrence Lessig</a>, is
licensed under a <a rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> Creative Commons Attribution License</a>.

Explanation

7This is a very basic example of how to include license metadata in HTML documents. The only metadata is provided by the rel="license" attribute in the a tag.rel="license" generates a triple with predicate xhtml:license. The triple relates the current document URI to the URI of the CC BY license to the URI for the xhtml:license predicate (http://www.w3.org/​1999/​xhtml/​vocab#license).

8How does this all occur by simply adding a single rel="license" attribute xhtml is the default prefix for reserved XHTML values, including license, which means that you don't need to do anything special to use it (like define the xhtml namespace). It is a built-in rel type. And the object of the rel="license" attribute is just set by the URL in the href attribute, which is true for all rel attributes.

License metadata with license image

9<a rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> <img
src=http://i.creativecommons.org/​l/​by/​3.0/​88x31.png /> </a> <br /> This page, by <a
href=http://lessig.org/​>Lawrence Lessig</a>, is
licensed under a <a rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> Creative Commons Attribution License</a>.

Explanation

10You can add rel="license" to any tag with a valid href attribute. This means that for links to the license, anything can be between the a tags, including an image of the license mark.

11In this example, the CC BY license mark is a link, with rel="license" metadata, to the license deed.

Attribution metadata

12<div xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/​ns#"><a
rel="license
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​> <img
src="http://i.creativecommons.org/​l/​by/​3.0/​88x31.png"/> </a> <br /> This page, by <a
property="cc:attributionName"
rel="cc:attributionURL"
href="http://lessig.org/​">Lawrence Lessig</a>, is
licensed under a <a rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> Creative Commons Attribution License</a>. </div>

Explanation

13This example shows how to include CC REL metadata into your HTML. This metadata is what enables the CC license deeds to give users copy-and-paste attribution HTML. To see an example of how the CC license deeds use this metadata, go to the example HTML and click on the license badge.

  • xmlns:cc associates the prefix cc with the URL http://creativecommons.org/​ns# throughout the div. This is critical for valid RDFa.
  • property generates a new triple with predicate cc:attributionName, and the text content of the element, in this case Lawrence Lessig, as the object. Note that the line does not break after the end of the opening a tag surrounding Lawrence Lessig. In the most recent draft of the RDFa specification, the text linked to by the a tag (the literal) would be processed to include any whitespaces within the a tag, including line breaks. Whitespace is not stripped from literals by RDFa processors that conform to the specification. When publishing RDFa it is important to remember this; that when parsed for RDFa, the format of your HTML could change the value of a literal to something other than what you might have expected.
  • rel="cc:attributionURL" generates a new triple with predicate cc:attributionURL, and the URL in the href as the object. The attribution URL is important when you want to indicate what URL re-users of your CClicensed work should link to when they attribute your work. This URL should appear in the license deed when someone clicks on your link to the CC license.

More metadata: Title, type, and subjects.

14<div about="" typeof="cc:Work"
xmlns:cc=http://creativecommons.org/​ns#
xmlns:dct=http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​ <a
rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> <img
src="http://i.creativecommons.org/​l/​by/​3.0/​88x31.png" />
</a> <br /> <span property="dct:title">The
Lessig Blog</span>, a <span rel="dct:type"
href="http://purl.org/​dc/​dcmitype/​Text">
collection of texts </span> by <a
property="cc:attributionName"
rel="cc:attributionURL"
href="http://lessig.org/​">Lawrence Lessig</a>, is
licensed under a <a rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> Creative Commons Attribution License</a>. </div>

Explanation

15Here build on the previous example to include new metadata:

  • about defines the subject of all triples within the div. Here we have about="", which defines the subject to be the URL of the current document. When making assertions about the current document, or current URL, you do not need to specify that about="". It is included here for completeness.
  • typeof="cc:Work" indicates that the current resource has the class of cc:Work, which in the http://creativecommons.org/​ns# namespace is described as "a potentially copyrightable work".
  • In addition to the cc namespace declaration (xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#"), we declare the Dublin Core Terms namespace (xmlns:dct="http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​"). This puts many more terms at our disposal.
  • Because we've declared the dct namespace, we can use terms like dct:title. We've embedded it in a span with the property attribute. The object of this assertion (that the current document has a dct:title) would be the literal between the span tags. In this case, the literal is The Lessig Blog. As noted above: Be careful not to include unnecessary whitespace in your literals, as this would change the assertion you are making.

Individual objects on a page
Text block.

Block of text, with license and attribution metadata

16<div> This text is not marked as CC licensed.
</div> <div about="#uniqueID" id="uniqueID"> This
text is licensed under a <a rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​>
Creative Commons Attribution License</a>. </div>

Explanation

17When embedding RDFa metadata into HTML, you aren't limited to making statements about the current URL. With the about attribute, you can set the subject of your triples to any arbitrary URI. In this example, we've set about="#uniqueID", which means that any RDFa within the div that has the about="#uniqueID" will have the HTML tag with id="uniqueID" as its subject. In this example, we have indicated that the div with id="uniqueID" is has a rel="license" of http://creativecommons.org/​licens es/by/3.0/.

Images

Image with license, attribution, and work metadata

18<div about="CC_image.png"
xmlns:dct=http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​
xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/​ns#"> <img
src="CC_image.png" height="200px" /> <br /> This
image, entitled <span property="dct:title">Sharing
Creative Works</span>, by <a
href=http://creativecommons.org/​
property="cc:attributionName"
rel="cc:attributionURL dct:creator">Creative
Commons</a> is licensed under a <a rel="license"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​">
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported
License</a>. </div>

Explanation

19This example builds on previous examples. As in the text block example, we make the license assertion about the image. In the surrounding div, we place an about attribute. This scopes all RDFa within the div as having (in this case) CC_image.png as its subject. Thus the rel="license" statement is about the image URL and not about the current URL, as would be the case if we did not include the about attribute.

20We have included some new metadata in this example as well. Each property has the image file as its subject due having specified about="CC_image.png":

  • property="dct:title" within the spanelement makes the assertion that the image file has a dct:title of Sharing Creative Works. Note that the title is an RDFa literal, meaning the object of the dct:title property is whatever falls within the span tag. Therefore, be careful not to include line breaks or other characters that you don't want to be a part of your assertion.
  • rel="cc:attributionURL dct:creator" is a compound rel attribute. Rather than using two separate rel attributes, we are able to place two attribute values within a single rel by separating the properties with a space. The rel attribute always has the href attribute as its object, which in this case is the URL to the Creative Commons main page, http://creativecommons.org/​.

Video

HTML5 video with one source tag and metadata

21<div
about=http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/​movingimages/​webm/​ASharedCulture_240p.webm
xmlns:cc=http://creativecommons.org/​ns#
xmlns:dct="http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​"> <video
width="426" height="240" preload="none" controls>
<source
src=http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/​movingimages/​webm/​ASharedCulture_240p.webm
type='video/webm; codecs="vp8, vorbis"'> </video>
br /> <a
href=http://creativecommons.org/​videos/​a-sharedculture
property="dct:title"

rel="cc:attributionURL">A Shared Culture</a>, by
<a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Jesse_Dylan
property="cc:attributionName"

rel="dct:creator">Jesse Dylan</a>, is licensed
under a <a rel="license"
http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by-ncsa/​3.0/​
Creative Commons Attribution
NonCommercial ShareAlike License</a>. </div>

Explanation

22Embedding CC REL metadata in an HTML5 video tag with a single source tag is straightforward. The technique is similar to embedding metadata about an image. An about attribute is used in a surrounding div to set the subject of all triples in the div to the URL of the video linked to by the source tag.

23Below the video, we've included a fairly standard CC license mark. As per the instruction on the video's official page, we have linked to the video page and attributed the video to its creator. Additionally, we have indicated the creator of the video with dct:creator with the object as Jesse Dylan's Wikipedia page. The text within that link is also used as a literal to set the object of cc:attributionName, Jesse Dylan.

HTML5 video with multiple source tags(EXPERIMENTAL)

24<div
about=http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/​movingimages/​webm/​ASharedCulture_240p.webm
xmlns:cc=http://creativecommons.org/​ns#
xmlns:dct="http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​"> <video
width="426" height="240" preload="none" controls>
<source
src=http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/​movingimages/​webm/​ASharedCulture_240p.webm
type='video/webm; codecs="vp8, vorbis"'> <source
src=http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/​movingimages/​ASharedCulture_240p.mp4
type='video/mp4;
codecs="avc1.42E01E, mp4a.40.2"'> <source
src=http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/​movingimages/​ASharedCulture_240p.ogv
type='video/ogg;
codecs="theora, vorbis"'> </video> <br /> <a
href=http://creativecommons.org/​videos/​a-sharedculture
property="dct:title"
rel="cc:attributionURL">A Shared Culture</a>, by
<a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Jesse_Dylan
property="cc:attributionName"
rel="dct:creator">Jesse Dylan</a>, is licensed
under a <a rel="license"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by-ncsa/​3.0/​">
Creative Commons Attribution
NonCommercial ShareAlike License</a>. <div
about=http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/​movingimages/​ASharedCulture_240p.mp4
property="dct:title"

content="A Shared Culture" style="display:none;">
<span property="cc:attributionName"
rel="dct:creator"
href=http://en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Jesse_Dylan
content="Jesse Dylan"> </span> <span
rel="cc:attributionURL"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​videos/​a-sharedculture">
</span> <span rel="license"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by-ncsa/​3.0/​"> </span> </div> <div
about="http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/​movingimages/​ASharedCulture_240p.ogv"
property="dct:title"
content="A Shared Culture" style="display:none;">
<span property="cc:attributionName"
rel="dct:creator"
href=http://en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Jesse_Dylan
content="Jesse Dylan"> </span> <span
rel="cc:attributionURL"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​videos/​a-sharedculture">
</span> <span rel="license"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by-ncsa/​3.0/​"> </span> </div> </div>

Explanation

25For HTML5 videos with multiple source tags, our markup is more complicated. Depending on a user's browser, a different video could be displayed when they visit the page. Each version of the video has equivalent content but a different URL. In this example, we have .web, .mp4, and .ogv videos. Thus, to accommodate this fact, we make several sets of assertions, each identical but with a different subject.

26In our example, we make one visible assertion about the first source URL, the webmvideo. The whole example is contained in a single div with the about attribute set to the URL to the webm video. The license metadata, not being re-scoped in any way, then has the subject of the webm video. Then, below the standard license assertion, we have two div elements, each hidden from view with a display: none; CSS rule. They are each scoped to a different video URL than the container div. Within both hidden divtags are the dct:title attributes. Rather than setting the object of property="dct:title" with content between the span tags, we use the content attribute to set the object of dct:title to A Shared Culture, the title of the video.

27Within that hidden div are three span tags that sets first both the dct:creator property and the cc:attributionName property, the cc:attributionURL property, and the rel="license" attribute. These three span tags are empty, so for the properties that take literals, i.e. property="cc:attributionName", we set the object of the property with a content attribute. In this example, we set the object of property="cc:attributionName" to Jesse Dylan with content="Jesse Dylan".

28We duplicate the hidden div tag but with a different about attribute to make the same assertions about all three formats of the same video.

Non-HTML5 video

29<div about=http://blip.tv/​play/​gpxSyZQBAg
xmlns:cc=http://creativecommons.org/​ns#
xmlns:dct="http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​"> <embed
src=http://blip.tv/​play/​gpxSyZQBAg
type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="480"
height="300" allowscriptaccess="always"
allowfullscreen="true"> </embed> <br /> <a
property="dct:title" rel="cc:attributionURL"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​videos/​a-sharedculture">
A Shared Culture</a>, by <a
href=http://en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Jesse_Dylan
property="cc:attributionName"
rel="dct:creator">Jesse Dylan</a>, is licensed
under a <a rel="license"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by-ncsa/​3.0/​">
Creative Commons Attribution
NonCommercial ShareAlike License</a>. </div>

Explanation

30Providing CC license metadata for non-HTML5 videos, typically embedded as Flash objects, is similar to our image example, or the single-source HTML5 example. We have a single URL to the video, which we set as the subject of our statements with an aboutattribute in the surrounding div. The URL is the same URL in the embed tag's src attribute.

Datasets

CC BY dataset, with license and attribution metadata

31<div about="example_dataset.csv"
xmlns:cc=http://creativecommons.org/​ns#
xmlns:dct="http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​"> <a
href="example_dataset.csv">Download Example
Dataset</a> <br /> <span
property="dct:title">Example Dataset</span> was
published by <a href=http://creativecommons.org/​
property="cc:attributionName"
rel="cc:attributionURL dct:publisher">Creative
Commons</a> and is licensed under a <a
rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> Creative Commons Attribution License</a>. </div>

Explanation

32Providing CC license data about a downloadable dataset is as easy as marking up an image or block of text. For datasets that have a URL, you can simply scope your statements with an about attribute so that your metadata has the subject of your dataset's URL.

33In this example, we set about="example_dataset.csv" so that the subsequent metadata is about the actual dataset.

34One thing to note is that here we've used a compound rel attribute with rel="cc:attributionURL dct:publisher" to set both the cc:attributionURL and dct:publisher with the same href attribute.

CC0 dataset, with license and attribution metadata

35<div about="example_dataset.csv"
xmlns:cc=http://creativecommons.org/​ns#
xmlns:dct=http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​
xmlns:vcard="http://www.w3.org/​2001/​vcardrdf/​3.0#">
<a href="example_dataset.csv">Download
Example Dataset</a> <br />x <a rel="license"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​publicdomain/​zero/​1.0/​"> <img
src="http://i.creativecommons.org/​l/​zero/​1.0/​88x31.png" style="border-style: none;" alt="CC0"/> </a>
<br/> To the extent possible under law, <a
rel="dct:publisher"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​"> <span
property="dct:title">Creative Commons</span></a>
has waived all copyright and related or
neighboring rights to <span
property="dct:title">Example Dataset</span> and
expects that users will follow the <a
rel="cc:useGuidelines" href=""> Creative Commons
Example Use Guidelines</a>. This work is published
from the <span property="vcard:Country"
datatype="dct:ISO3166" content="US"
about="http://creativecommons.org/​">United
States</span>. </div>

Explanation

36One can mark a downloadable dataset as having been placed in the public domain with the CC0 waiver. You can create valid CC0 markup using the CC0 tool.

37As with the previous example, we set the subject of our metadata with an about attribute, setting it to the dataset file (in this case example_dataset.csv). We must also declare the vcard namespace, as it allows us to make statements about the country of the publisher, which is important information for public domain content.

38We can use rel="license" to indicate that copyright has been licensed (or in this case, waived) using the CC0 waiver (by setting the href attribute to the URL of the waiver, http://creativecommons.org/​publicdomain/​zero/​1.0/​.

39Additionally, we must set a dct:publisher for the dataset. This will tell us who is publishing it, and will allow us to determine the relevant jurisdiction for the dataset's copyright status. In this example, the publisher is set to http://creativecommons.org/​. At the end of the example, you'll see that we've indicated http://creativecommons.org/​ has vcard:country with content="US". While one could use the content between the span elements as the literal value for vcard:Country, the CC0 and Public Domain Mark deeds require a literal value with a datatype="ISO3166". That is, you don't need to specify acontent attribute if your literal value is already has that datatype (if US was between the span, rather than United States, for example). We additionally indicate that this data, content="US" hasdatatype="dct:ISO3166".

40Lastly, we've indicated Use Guidelines to this work by using the cc:useGuidelines predicate in a rel attribute. In this example, the object href is empty because we have not created an example use guidelines document, but in practice this link would point to actual use guidelines for the work. For more information, see this CC wiki page. Please note that use guidelines are not legally binding, and cc:useGuidelines is not meant to specify a URL that indicates legally binding guidelines for the work.

Multiple CC Licenses on a Page

Multiple CC objects: Text and Image

41<div xmlns:dct=http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​
xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/​ns#"> <div
about="CC_image.png"> <img src="CC_image.png"
height="200px" /> <br /> <a rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> <img
src="http://i.creativecommons.org/​l/​by/​3.0/​88x31.png" /> </a> <br /> <span
property="dct:title">Sharing Creative
Works</span>, by <a
href=http://creativecommons.org/​
property="cc:attributionName"
rel="cc:attributionURL dct:creator">Creative
Commons</a> is licensed under a <a rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported
License</a>. </div> <br /> <a rel="license"
href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/bysa/3.0/"> <img
src="http://i.creativecommons.org/​l/​bysa/​3.0/​88x31.png" /> </a> <br /> This page, by <a
rel="cc:attributionURL dct:creator"
property="cc:attributionName"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​foobar">Foo
Bar</a>, is licensed under a <a rel="license"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​bysa/​3.0/​"> Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike
3.0 Unported License</a>. </div>

Explanation

42We have already seen the strategy for including metadata about different objects on a page in the text block and other examples. The general idea is to set different subjects for different sets of metadata with an about attribute in a surrounding element, like a div. In this example, we have two different license assertions. One assertion is made about the whole document, and one is made about the CC_image.png image. The license assertion about the page follows the standard attribution example. All metadata is about the current document because no about attribute is set to scope the statements. Then, above that metadata, we have a div that sets the subject CC_image.png with an about attribute. Within that div is license metadata about the license applied to that image.

43There are two license assertions in this example. One is about the example as a whole, and one about the image within the example. If you were to click the license deeds from the example, the CC license deed would see and display metadata from that work on the page and in the copy-and-paste attribution HTML. This is because the license assertions are made about different licenses; for the resource as a whole, CC BY-SA, and for the image, CC BY. Unfortunately, if both license assertions were the same, the CC license deed would not be able to determine which metadata to display and would therefore display none.

Attributing Reuses

Attributing a single-source remix

44<div xmlns:cc=http://creativecommons.org/​ns#
xmlns:dct="http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​"> <a
rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> <img
src="http://i.creativecommons.org/​l/​by/​3.0/​88x31.png" /> </a> <br /> Este remix del <a
href="attribution.html" rel="dct:source"> <span
property="dct:title">Attribution
Example</span></a> de <a about="attribution.html"
href="http://lessig.org/​" rel="dct:creator"> <span
property="dct:title">Lawrence Lessig</span></a>,
es por <a property="cc:attributionName"
rel="cc:attributionURL"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​">Creative
Commons</a> y está disponible bajo una licencia <a
rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported</a>.
</div>

Explanation

45Attributing a source work in a remix is similar to how you would attribute a CC license work in a use, with one addition: you indicate a source work for the current document using dct:source. In this example, we have a Spanish version of an earlier example. The original document is indicated as the source of the current URL by linking to the source, href="attribution.html", and specifying rel="dct:source". The title of the source document is set in the span within the link. Here it's important to note that dct:title is describing the object of the surrounding tag; in this case, attribution.html. We also properly attribute the original document with the correct cc:attributionURL and cc:attributionName specified by the source. Lastly, we set a new cc:attributionURL and cc:attributionName for the remixed work.

Attributing a multiple-source remix

46<div xmlns:cc=http://creativecommons.org/​ns#
xmlns:dct="http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​"> <div
about="CC_image.png"
xmlns:dct=http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​
xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/​ns#"> <img
src="CC_image.png" height="200px" /> <br /> <span
property="dct:title">Sharing Creative
Works</span>, by <a
href=http://creativecommons.org/​
property="cc:attributionName"
rel="cc:attributionURL dct:creator">Creative
Commons</a> is licensed under a <a rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported
License</a>. </div> <br /> Este remix de <a
href="attribution.html" rel="dct:source"> <span
property="dct:title">Attribution
Example</span></a>, de <a about="attribution.html"
rel="dct:creator"
href="http://lessig.org/​">Lawrence Lessig</a>, y
<a href="image.html" rel="dct:source"> <span
property="dct:title">Image Example</span></a>, por
<a about="image.html" rel="dct:creator"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​">Creative
Commons</a>, fue creado por <a
property="cc:attributionName"
rel="cc:attributionURL"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​">Creative
Commons</a> y está disponible bajo una <a
rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported
License</a>. </div>

Explanation

47To attribute multiple sources in a remixed document, you simply need to indicate multiple dct:source documents. In this example, we have a document that is a remix of two source documents. Both source documents have been marked as being a dct:source. Additionally, the source documents are properly attributed and linked to as prescribed within each.

Public Domain Content
CC0

Marking waiver, publisher, and use guidelines

48<div xmlns:dct=http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​
xmlns:cc=http://creativecommons.org/​ns#
xmlns:vcard="http://www.w3.org/​2001/​vcardrdf/​3.0#"> <a rel="license"
href="http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/"> <img
src="http://i.creativecommons.org/​l/​zero/​1.0/​88x31.png" style="border-style: none;" alt="CC0"/> </a>
<br/> To the extent possible under law, <a
rel="dct:publisher"
href="http://creativecommons.org/​"> <span
property="dct:title">Creative Commons</span></a>
has waived all copyright and related or
neighboring rights to <span
property="dct:title">Example Work</span> and
expects that users will follow the <a
rel="cc:useGuidelines" href=""> Creative Commons
Example Use Guidelines</a>. This work is published
from the <span property="vcard:Country"
datatype="dct:ISO3166" content="US"
about="http://creativecommons.org/​">United
States</span>. </div>

Explanation

49To mark a work as having been placed into the public domain with the CC0 waiver, one follows similar steps from previous examples. If you'd like to avoid manually embedding metadata, You can create valid CC0 markup using the CC0 tool.

50The link to the CC0 waiver should include a rel="license" attribute, even though the CC0 waiver is not a license, legally speaking. The dct:publisher should be set to the identifying URL of the publishing entity.

51As in our dataset example, you should register the vcard namespace in the CC0 waiver mark. This enables the vcard:Country property, as seen at the bottom of this example. As in the datset example, we make a vcard:Country assertion about the dct:publisher. In this case, that publisher is http://creativecommons.org. For the vcard:Country value, we override the literal United States between the span tags by providing a content attribute, set to US. We additionally specify the datatype for this content attribute with datatype="dct:ISO3166". While one could use the content between the span elements as the literal value for vcard:Country, the CC0 and Public Domain Mark deeds require a literal value with a datatype="ISO3166". That is, you don't need to specify a contentattribute if your literal value is already has that datatype (if US was between the span, rather than United States, for example).

52As in previous examples, we have the option of linking to Use Guidelines for the work. To indicate that a link is to Use Guidelines we include a rel="cc:useGuidelines" attribute in the link. If this metadata is included, when someone clicks on the PDM mark the deed should discover that metadata and link to the guideline URL. In this example the href attribute is empty but would normally include the location of any use guidelines. Please note that use guidelines are not legally binding, and cc:useGuidelines is not meant to specify a URL that indicates legally binding guidelines for the work.

Public Domain Mark

Marking license, publisher, and use guidelines

53<div about="Mona_Lisa.jpeg"
xmlns:dct="http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​"> <img
src="Mona_Lisa.jpeg" /> <br /> <a rel="license"
href="http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/"> <img
src="http://i.creativecommons.org/​p/​mark/​1.0/​88x31.png" style="border-style: none;" alt="Public
Domain Mark" /> </a> <br /> This work (<span
property="dct:title">Mona Lisa</span>, by <a
href="http://en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Leonardo_da_Vinci" rel="dct:creator"> <span
property="dct:title">Leonardo di ser Piero da
Vinci</span> </a>), identified by <a
href=http://yergler.net/​
rel="dct:publisher"><span
property="dct:title">Nathan Yergler</span></a>, is
free of known copyright restrictions. Users are
requested to honor the non-binding <a href=""
rel="cc:useGuidelines">use guidelines</a>. </div>

Explanation

54Using the Public Domain Mark is very similar to using the CC0 waiver. First we set the subject of our metadata to the content being identified. In this case, we set about="Mona_Lisa.jpeg". We then set a rel="license" attribute in the link to the PDM mark, again even though the mark is not strictly a license. We can also identify a creator of the work; in this case, the dct:creator is Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci, which is a literal dct:title value applied to the URL http://en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Leonardo_da_Vinci, identifying the creator.

55It is important we identify a dct:publisher of the resource, which is the entity making the Public Domain identification. The object of dct:publisher is a URL set with an href which is then given a dct:title. In this case, the dct:publisher is http://yergler.net/​ which has the title Nathan Yergler.

56As in previous examples, we have the option of linking to Use Guidelines for the work. To indicate that a link is to Use Guidelines we include a rel="cc:useGuidelines" attribute in the link. If this metadata is included, when someone clicks on the PDM mark the deed should discover that metadata and link to the guideline URL. In this example the href attribute is empty but would normally include the location of any use guidelines. Please note that use guidelines are not legally binding, and cc:useGuidelines is not meant to specify a URL that indicates legally binding guidelines for the work.

Marking copyright registration

Marking a work as registered (CC Network)

57<a xmlns:sioc=http://rdfs.org/​sioc/​ns#
rel="sioc:has_owner"

href="https://creativecommons.net/​creativecommons/"> <img
src="https://creativecommons.net/​i/​creativecommons/​" style="border:0;" /> </a> <a rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> <img
src="http://i.creativecommons.org/​l/​by/​3.0/​us/​88x31.png" style="border:0;" /> </a> <br /> <span
xmlns:dct=http://purl.org/​dc/​terms/​
property="dct:title">Example Work</span> by <a
xmlns:cc=http://creativecommons.org/​ns#
href=http://creativecommons.org/​
property="cc:attributionName"
rel="cc:attributionURL">Creative Commons</a> is
licensed under a <a rel="license"
href=http://creativecommons.org/​licenses/​by/​3.0/​
> Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported
License</a>.

Explanation

58Registering work on the CC Network is a multi-step process. First, you must have an account on the CC Network. For more details on obtaining one, see creativecommons.net. Then you must find the stable URL to your work and follow the directions on the CC Network to registering it as your work. In your CC Network account, you should be given a copy-and-paste version of the CC Network badge to place on the work.

59In this example, you can see the CC Network badge with the embedded registration metadata. First the sioc namespace is declared. Then we link the badge to our CC Network account with a rel="sioc:has_owner" to indicate that this is a link to the owner of the current document.

60With this metadata in place, when someone clicks through to the license deed from the work, the deed will display registration information and link to the registration page on the CC Network.